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94 Excellent Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School 

December 4, 2023 //  by  Brittany Ray

Middle schoolers are always ready for a feisty debate and to argue their points! This list of excellent argumentative essay topics for middle school is sure to give your students the practice they need in getting their arguments down on paper, in a persuasive way. With a variety of topics ranging from whether or not to outlaw animal testing to debating a 3-day weekend, this curated collection will give your kiddos lots of fun choices to explore! Take a look and see which topics are sure to spark some interest in your classroom!

School Rules and Policies

1. should cell phones be allowed at school.

argument essay for middle school

2. Should gym class (physical education) be a requirement?

argument essay for middle school

3. Explain why or why not: Should students have homework on weekends?

argument essay for middle school

4. Should the school day be extended in exchange for a long weekend?

argument essay for middle school

5. Do you feel the government should dictate what you get for school lunch?

argument essay for middle school

6. Do you believe brick-and-mortar schools are still necessary for today’s post-pandemic society?

argument essay for middle school

7. Is the student-per-class limit too high?

argument essay for middle school

8. Should high school students be required to take a civics exam before graduation?

argument essay for middle school

9. Should school security be improved?

argument essay for middle school

10. Should students be allowed to use smartwatches during examinations?

argument essay for middle school

11. Should there be a limit to the amount of homework a school can assign to students?

argument essay for middle school

12. Is the traditional grading system effective, or does it need an overhaul?

argument essay for middle school

13. Should schools offer more extracurricular activities to cater to diverse interests?

argument essay for middle school

14. Do schools place too much emphasis on sports and athletes at the expense of academic pursuits?

argument essay for middle school

15. Explain your stance as to whether schools should or should not require students to wear uniforms.

argument essay for middle school

16. Do you believe that school field trips are beneficial or merely recreational?

argument essay for middle school

17. Should students be required to learn a second language starting in middle school?

argument essay for middle school

18. Should the government have the ability to ban certain books in the classroom?

argument essay for middle school

19. Should school cafeterias serve exclusively vegetarian meals to promote health?

argument essay for middle school

20. Should schools have mandatory classes on financial literacy?

argument essay for middle school

21. Should schools have strict policies against cyberbullying?

argument essay for middle school

22. Should schools have mandatory mental health classes and counseling sessions?

argument essay for middle school

23. Should students be allowed to grade their teachers?

argument essay for middle school

24. Should schools have mindfulness and meditation sessions as part of the daily routine?

argument essay for middle school

25. Should schools emphasize more on teaching critical thinking skills rather than just memorizing things?

argument essay for middle school

26. Should there be more emphasis on vocational training in middle school?

argument essay for middle school

27. Should students be taught the dangers of misinformation and “fake news” as part of their curriculum?

argument essay for middle school

28. Should schools introduce mandatory community service as part of the curriculum?

argument essay for middle school

29. Should schools allow students to bring their pets to school?

argument essay for middle school

30. Should schools be allowed to monitor students’ online activities?

argument essay for middle school

31. Should education about global warming and environmental conservation be a mandatory part of the curriculum?

argument essay for middle school

32. Should schools introduce more practical skills courses like basic cooking, sewing, or home repair?

argument essay for middle school

33. Do school dress codes infringe on personal expression?

argument essay for middle school

34. Should middle school students be allowed to bring and use laptops in class?

argument essay for middle school

35. Is homeschooling a better option than traditional schooling for some students?

argument essay for middle school

36. Is learning to write in cursive still a necessary skill in the digital age?

argument essay for middle school

37. Should school libraries invest in more digital resources or in physical books?

argument essay for middle school

38. Should students be taught about controversial historical figures objectively or with a critical lens?

argument essay for middle school

39. Should students have a more significant say in the creation of school rules and policies?

argument essay for middle school

40. Do schools focus too much on college preparation at the expense of life skills?

argument essay for middle school

41. Should parents be held more accountable for their children’s misbehavior at school?

argument essay for middle school

42. Are parent-teacher conferences still effective or have they become outdated?

argument essay for middle school

43. Should middle schools have later start times to accommodate adolescent sleep patterns?

argument essay for middle school

College Admission and Tuition 

44. should excellent grades guarantee a scholarship.

argument essay for middle school

45. Should a college degree earned through online education have the same worth as a degree earned at a brick-and-mortar university?

argument essay for middle school

46. Do you feel art courses should be a required part of earning a college degree?

argument essay for middle school

47. Should college admission criteria be less stringent?

argument essay for middle school

48. Should college athletes be paid?

argument essay for middle school

49. Do you believe that a college education is necessary for everyone?

argument essay for middle school

50. Should public education at the college level be tuition-free?

argument essay for middle school

Health and Wellbeing

51. do parents put too much pressure on their children to excel academically.

argument essay for middle school

52. Should cigarettes be illegal?

argument essay for middle school

53. Should employers have the right to require a Covid-19 vaccine?

argument essay for middle school

54. Is milk beneficial to a person’s health?

argument essay for middle school

55. Are hot dogs bad for you?

argument essay for middle school

56. Do you agree or disagree that parents should be held responsible for childhood obesity?

argument essay for middle school

57. Should the FDA allow GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) in our food?

argument essay for middle school

58. Does the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) do a good job of regulating the production of food?

argument essay for middle school

59. Should junk food advertisements be banned during children’s TV shows?

argument essay for middle school

60. Should students be allowed to take “mental health days” off from school?

argument essay for middle school

Government, Politics, and Civic Responsibilities

61. do you think electronic voting machines make the election procedure fair or unfair.

argument essay for middle school

62. Explain whether or not the Electoral College should be eliminated.

argument essay for middle school

63. Should the government have more say in what is or is not “fake news”?

argument essay for middle school

64. Should a felon have the right to vote?

argument essay for middle school

65. Should all political offices have term limits?

argument essay for middle school

66. Should the voting age be lowered?

argument essay for middle school

67. The moral stain of the slavery of African American people in early American History is undoubtedly present. Do you feel the government promotes hate or love with the way it currently speaks about racism?

argument essay for middle school

68. Should the minimum wage be raised to $15 an hour?

argument essay for middle school

69. Should the government have more strict gun control policies?

argument essay for middle school

70. With the separation of church and state, should churches be exempt from paying taxes?

argument essay for middle school

71. Do you feel undocumented immigrants should be granted all the same rights as naturalized citizens?

argument essay for middle school

72. Have Native American communities been given proper reparations for the United States’ long history of seizing land?

argument essay for middle school

73. Do you think that the government should do more to fight against human trafficking?

argument essay for middle school

Environmental and Moral Issues

74. is climate change something we can truly make a difference with.

argument essay for middle school

75. If protecting the environment is of utmost importance, should bottled water be banned?

argument essay for middle school

76. Should exotic animals be kept in captivity?

argument essay for middle school

77. Explain your stance on whether wind farms are a good or bad idea.

argument essay for middle school

78. Do “participation trophies” diminish the value of real achievement?

argument essay for middle school

79. Should there be harsher punishments for bullying?

argument essay for middle school

80. Explain whether or not animal testing should be outlawed.

argument essay for middle school

81. Should the death penalty exist?

argument essay for middle school

82. Should an individual be able to keep wild animals as pets if they have the means to care for them?

argument essay for middle school

83. Do curfews for teenagers prevent them from getting in trouble or infringe on personal freedom?

argument essay for middle school

84. Is scientific research on cloning DNA ethical?

argument essay for middle school

85. Is daylight saving something the U.S. should keep, or should it be abolished?

argument essay for middle school

86. Should schools ban single-use plastics?

argument essay for middle school

Digital and Media

87. do children currently have too much screen time, and is it harmful.

argument essay for middle school

88. Do you believe that the media and/or social media negatively impact body image among teens?

argument essay for middle school

89. Do social media platforms need stricter age verification processes?

argument essay for middle school

90. Should parents have access to their children’s social media accounts for monitoring purposes?

argument essay for middle school

91. Should parents limit the time their children spend on video games?

argument essay for middle school

92. Should violent video games be banned in the United States?

argument essay for middle school

93. Do violent cartoons and animations impact a child’s behavior negatively?

argument essay for middle school

94. Do video games have educational potential or are they merely distractions?

argument essay for middle school

illustrated Tea Cup

50 Mindblowing Argumentive Essay Topics for Middle School

Mindblowing Argumentive Essay Topics for Middle School

Don’t you think middle schoolers are very good at debates and discussions? This is their time to use their brain cells on the things that have a bigger impact on the world. This is the time when they should be given valid topics to do healthy debates and be argumentative among themselves over each other’s points.

Such activities enhance their way of thinking and expand their outlook on bigger problems that are affecting people on a larger scale. We, as their mentors, should give them real points to present their arguments on! We must present sensible topics in front of them to brainstorm about!

Sometimes we, elders, also get off topic and get starstruck at the thought process of our young minds. It is truly sensational to watch them brainstorm and debate about real-life argumentative topics that are highly impactful on a worldwide level.

Importance of Choosing the Right Topic

Importance of Choosing the Right Topic

Choosing the right topic for an essay is as important as writing an essay. Before writing an essay, you should know what you are writing about and how you are going to write it. Essays are less about how you write and more about what you write. The major element of an essay is the argumentative topic that your choose to write on. The debates and discussions that arise from the topic that you choose to write about are what truly engage the readers or listeners. So, make sure you offer amazing argumentative topics for your students to write and speak about. Here are the three key benefits that you get from a good and efficiently chosen topic for an argumentative essay.

1. Speeds Up The Process

Choosing a topic for your essay can speed up your process of writing and framing it. How? Once you choose a topic of your choice and you know the connectivity of your thoughts with that topic, you will know your path. We need to know the path where we want to walk to reach our destination. If we don’t know the path, then we will end up reaching no man’s land. This is a benefit that you get by choosing a topic for your essay before you begin to brainstorm about diverse topics.

2. Insurance of Maximum Marks

The purpose of writing on argumentative topics is that it helps you cater to the information from various sites and guides, which increases your thinking capabilities. The reason why schools and colleges take argumentative topics to give to their students is that such topics make students think to their highest capacity to be able to stand out with their exceptional thoughts among their colleagues. Such topics not just let a student have a broader mindset, but they also start to think about real-world problems and how to be a part of solving and brainstorming about them. Hence, adding argumentative topics to their essay is surely going to enhance the marks of your students.

3. Imparts Better Learning

The ultimate profit of choosing the right and definite topic for your argumentative essay is that it lets you think deeper about it. You will have enough time to dig deeper into the facts and brainstorm everything you read before you add it to your content. Not just this, but it might also open many doors in your mind regardless of writing it only for marks. Writing an essay is much wider than just gaining marks, and students will surely understand this once they cater an interest in the topic they are writing about!

Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle Schoolers

Topics that enhance the thinking capacity of your students are going to be the best ones. Topics that are relatable and knowledgeable enough to make your students think more and from more than one perspective. That is what we call a perfect argumentative topic.

1. Should Students Have Homework on Weekends?

Should Students Have Homework on Weekends?

This topic is surely going to set a good environment for discussions and debates in your class among your students. The good part about this topic is that you, as a teacher, are going to get diverse perspectives about homework from all the students in your class. Whereas talking about the students, you all are going to get a good chance to express your view on homework given for weekends.

2. Government Should Dictate What You Get for School Lunch

SCHOOLS PROMOTING HEALTH

Well, this topic is going to bring out many arguments. As a teacher, you are going to enjoy the healthy arguments for and against it as well as are going to get confused about which side you should be. As a student, this session is surely going to bring out your opinions about mid-day meals.

3. Should Cell Phones Be Allowed at School?

Should Cell Phones Be Allowed at School?

In this digital era, it is quite difficult to keep children away from it. At such a time, this topic might bring all the student committees together to allow mobile phones at school, whereas it might make teachers stand against the students. Well, it is surely going to be super-exciting.

4. Should Exotic Animals Be Kept in Captivity?

Should Exotic Animals Be Kept in Captivity?

One of those thought-provoking topics where the thinking seems like coming to the edge. Should exotic animals be kept in captivity, or should they be set free to live in their habitat? Yes, it is sure a serious topic to think about and discuss. I think this is one of my favorite ones.

5. Should There Be Harsher Punishments for The Person Bullying?

Should There Be Harsher Punishments for The Person Bullying?

Bullying has always been one of the serious problems at school for kids. Especially as they hit puberty, it increases and doesn’t seem to end too early. Many kids are the victims of bullying and its horrible after-effects that even lead to depression and anxiety. This is surely going to be a touchy topic with a good moral values session.

6. Video Games Violating People Being Violent in Real Life or Not?

Video Games Violating People Being Violent in Real Life or Not?

We have always heard and even witnessed that whatever we spend more time in, we slowly-slowly become like that. Does that also apply to the games? Especially the games that are violent and contain killing and taking lives and having pleasure from them? And because of such games, is it possible for such people to get that pleasure from killing in real life as well?

7. Is It Fair for Minorities to Receive Special Treatment?

Is It Fair for Minorities to Receive Special Treatment?

Minorities are truly considered those whose rights need to be protected by the government itself because they are less in number enough to stand against the majority. But is it needed even in today’s time when everybody has achieved equal rights? Well, this topic is surely going to bring a lot of for and against debates and discussions to the classroom.

8. Do Reality TV Shows Accurately Depict Real Life?

Death, Death, Death and a Bucket of Chicken

Children and even adults have always been attracted to reality shows because they think it is literally what it means to be a “reality show.” But the question is, Is it so? This topic is one of those topics that is going to help someone bring reality to light and someone to get a reality check of it.

9. Should Parents Monitor Their Children’s Internet Usage?

Should Parents Monitor Their Children’s Internet Usage?

Parents often have such questions in their minds, like, what are their kids watching for so long? What is keeping them so occupied on the phone? What their kids must be watching on the internet? What if their kids are under some bad influence? What if they are watching something they shouldn’t? And many more things. We will get a see-through of kids’ perspective on this through this topic.

10. Is It Okay for Parents to Check Their Ward’s Devices?

Is It Okay for Parents to Check Their Ward’s Devices?

Here we have again such a topic that comes to screen time information about children. This topic is going to be very helpful for both kids and parents to be able to understand each other properly and in a better way. I think such topics where we get to hear from children themselves what they think about parents’ certain actions help a lot in parent-child understanding.

11. Do Cultures Unite Us, or Do They Divide Instead?

Do Cultures Unite Us, or Do They Divide Instead?

For a lifetime, we see and live around people with diverse cultures and beliefs. This topic is going to let us know what children think and what opinions they have about living around different cultures. Does it feel good or kind of weird? With that, this session can be wrapped up with a good moral teaching of acceptance and respect for each other.

12. Is Climate Change Real, and Is It Happening?

Is Climate Change Real, and Is It Happening? .jpg

This is one of those real problems that need to be taken care of! Children need exposure to such real-world issues that most people ignore. Being so busy today that we are forgetting what we are destroying for tomorrow. In my opinion, such topics are a must-have in essay and debate sessions because it helps students think wider than they can.

13. Will the Changing Environment Change Human Physiology?

Will the Changing Environment Change Human Physiology? .jpg

We all are well aware of how human physiology has changed over time with the changes in the planet. Evolution has always shown its proof of being unstoppable. By putting light on this topic, students are going to learn the wider aspect of geography and can get wider knowledge about human geography. Through this, they can bring predictable points for the arguments in this session.

14. Humans are the Biggest Threat to The Environment, Is It?

Humans are the Biggest Threat to The Environment, Is It?

We, humans, love what we have, and so we do our all to keep it all forever with us. But in all this, are we becoming the monsters who are killing their beautiful mother earth? Are we doing injustice to the environment and this planet? Or is it just the physiological change that was destined to come itself? This is surely going to be a super thought-provoking session for the class, and many are surely going to feel guilty for their littlest actions.

15. Do Lab Rats Have Rights?

Do Lab Rats Have Rights?

Are rats just mere experimental toys? Don’t they have any right to live? Can’t they live without the fear of being caught and sent to the labs for experiments? Do they deserve such horrible deaths and cursed life? Well, this topic is going to be a mix of practical, logical, and emotional arguments. So, as a teacher, you better get ready on which side you are going to stand.

16. The Importance of Protecting Endangered Animals

The Importance of Protecting Endangered Animals

Animals that are soon going to get extinct, and our kids won’t ever be able to know their actual appearance except for in books. Why is this topic still in ignorance, and no one debates about it on big platforms? We all love to be called as animal-lovers, but are we an animal-lover or just dog or cat lovers? Let this topic be free in your classroom to be discussed by young minds.

17. Is Animal Testing Justified?

Is Animal Testing Justified?

Is it justified to test every other thing on animals? Are they just mere experimental toys for the sake of the lives of us humans? From when did we become so selfish? Is science all about humans and not about animals? Although we know we all are nothing without the existence of each other. Then why does it keep happening? Set these questions free to go to your student’s minds.

18. The Challenges and Benefits of Remote Education

The Challenges and Benefits of Remote Education

Ever since the pandemic hit us, we have transformed many things and have discovered many new ways of convenience. In the field of education, schools, and colleges switched to online mode from offline. Now the question arises is online mode a better doorway to education for kids? Or was it better the way it was? Well, we are going to get the right answer from the learners themselves!

19. Has Education Become Just a Piece of Paper with a Degree?

Has Education Become Just a Piece of Paper with a Degree?

Are we getting educated to gain knowledge, or is it just the degree that we are running behind? Why is there so much value in a child who tops and not the one who fails to grasp it all? Education is for knowledge, or is it for just getting a piece of paper that proves that we are deserving of what we want? Get this from young minds, and they won’t disappoint you.

20. Discuss the Risks of Unemployment Due to The Global Pandemic

covid and unemployment, pictured by word unemployment and viruses to symbolize that unemployment is related to corona pandemic and that epidemic affects unemployment a lot, 3d illustration

We all know how the global pandemic has affected almost all sectors, from agriculture to businesses, from education to jobs, and many more. In that case, making students discuss unemployment due to the global pandemic is going to enhance their understanding of the real world.

21. how Are We Dealing with Global Poverty?

how Are We Dealing with Global Poverty?

Poverty has become one of the crucial topics to be discussed. How people face critically difficult times managing at least one day a meal, and how it is becoming critical for them to manage a living for themselves. All these things need to be discussed by putting forward such topics.

22. Measures Should Be Taken in Households for Energy Conservation

Measures Should Be Taken in Households for Energy Conservation

As we say, “Charity begins at home.” It all starts with where we live and what we do as an individual. This topic is going to make your students discuss how they can save energy starting from their homes and can make a huge difference as an individual.

23. The Rising Political Polarization in The US

The Rising Political Polarization in The US .jpg

Politics is a topic that is lately losing its area of interest in young minds. It seems to become so fussy nowadays that kids tend to run away from these topics. At such a time, the teachers need to bring forward and put this topic as a task to argue about them, which will further make them research it.

24. Do Participation Trophies Have Value

Do Participation Trophies Have Value

The one who wins gets the trophy as a token of their great win and excellence, but what about those who showed the courage to participate and made that competition worth it? If the participants will also get trophies, then what is special about being a winner? Well, that is a tough choice to choose between. Which side are you going to stand for?

25. What Issue Should Lawmakers Be Most Concerned About?

What Issue Should Lawmakers Be Most Concerned About?

Which issue, according to our young brains, should be put forward by the lawmakers first by keeping the others aside? What is in their mind regarding the law-making body and the processes? It is thoroughly important to understand their views on this topic and how they are going to write an argumentative essay on it.

26. Side Effects of Cigarettes, Should They Be Banned?

Side Effects of Cigarettes, Should They Be Banned?

Cigarettes! No doubt the box itself says that they should not be used. The box itself says that you are paying to go close to your death by your own choice. Then too, why are people so much into it? Why do they want to die so early with pain? And why is it still a debate to make them outlawed? Is there something left that can be brought in their favor strong enough to be outlawed? Let us hear it from our brainy generations!

27. Do Celebrities Have the Right to Privacy or Not?

Do Celebrities Have the Right to Privacy or Not?

If someone chooses to glamour the enter world, then is it crucial for them to leave their private space and right to privacy behind? Can’t they have their own personal life and personal space? Or have they given the right to the public to intrude in their privacy by their choice? Let us see the opinions of our young minds on it.

28. Are School Uniforms a Good Idea?

Are School Uniforms a Good Idea?

School uniforms are not there in some schools, whereas, in some of them, they are a part of their unforgettable legacy. In that case, is it good to keep the school uniforms or might not be perfect according to some people’s dressing style? Well, let us get to hear it from the wearers themselves. Maybe that is going to end this debate.

29. Do Beauty Pageants Objectify the Participants?

Do Beauty Pageants Objectify the Participants?

Beauty pageants have always been a part of controversial conversations in the glamour world. But do they do justice to their participants? Or do they just reject the ones who don’t seem perfect in their parameters? Is it all just for show, or is it really what gives wings to the forgotten beauties? This is surely going to cover a lot of illusions for many students.

30. Lying Politicians Should be Punished or Not?

Lying Politicians Should be Punished or Not?

This topic is going to enhance their interest in politics and rights and bring alterations to some wrong-made rules. Every student needs to know the correct rights and laws. Hence, they must know the difference between the laws and privileges.

Well, these were some highly discussed topics that make amazing argumentative topics. We have tried to put in discussable points in these top 30 argumentative essay topics that we hope are surely going to help your students enhance their writing and speaking skills. Along with writing and speaking skills, it is also very important to do a good amount of research and think by going out of their comfort zone, which is surely going to make them brilliant writers and speakers. Below we have listed 20 further argumentative essay topics that contain such fields but with a wider sense of thinking.

Other Diverse Argumentative Essay Topics

  • Is too much homework harmful, helpful, or both?
  • Is access to a needed medical treatment a basic human right?
  • Is milk terrible or suitable for you?
  • Parents should be responsible for childhood obesity. Agree or Disagree?
  • Wind farms are a good or a bad idea. Explain why?
  • What do you think is the perfect age to start using social media platforms?
  • Do you believe that a college education is necessary for everyone?
  • Do you think the act of cloning DNA brings forth a moral issue?
  • Should the government have more strict gun control policies?
  • From what age should children start helping and learning about home chores?
  • Do electronic voting machines make the electoral procedure fairer or unfair?
  • Should there be any alteration in the voting age? Yes or No? If yes, then should it be lowered or raised?
  • Should bottled water be banned?
  • Should excellent grades guarantee a scholarship?
  • Should schools have better security than they have today?
  • Has Artificial Intelligence gone too far?
  • Is the time for Artificial Intelligence to rule over Human Intelligence coming close?
  • Should public education at the college level be tuition-free?
  • Should Government have the right to declare which news is a fact and which one is fake?
  • Are we using non-exhaustible renewable resources properly, or are we still far away from having a sustainable world?

Structure of An Argumentative Essay

After choosing a topic for your essay, it is important to write about it in the correct structure. Argumentative essays are ones that not just have to deal with the simple content language but also the topics that prove the points you are claiming. There are many types of argumentative essays, like persuasive essays, analytical papers, research papers, and so on, but they all have one common thing, and that is their structures!

1. Introduction/Opening

This is where you start to put an impactful effect through your writing in the introduction. Your introduction can start with a question that can be a hook for maintaining the excitement of your argumentative essay. The hook can be an exclamatory sentence, a question sentence, or can be an assertive sentence as well. All you have to do is bridge your introduction with the main body by maintaining the thrill of your content.

2. Main Body

This part of your essay must have all the arguments and supportive statements for them. Every statement of yours should be concisely explained in this part of your essay. You can either allocate each argument in a different paragraph or can put all of them in points in one single paragraph. You must explain your argument properly with proof, references, and citations. Even though you have a good word limit in essays but try to keep it concise and to point with sharp and straightforward arguments and proof.

3. Conclusion/Closing

Here comes another important part of your essay. This part is the last part of your essay and hence should have a good closing paragraph. This portion should have a takeaway message for all the readers what is the end product of all those arguments? It also must have the connective explanations summarized at the end for the readers. This will have a good impact on them. Many students make mistakes by taking this section very lightly because they think they have done a huge part in the introduction and main body, but all these three parts have their individual and equally important roles.

So, make sure you provide justice to all three sections of your argumentative essay properly by keeping none of them in negligence.

Summing It Up

All in all, we hope that you might have got your guide for writing a good argumentative essay. There is a lot more to discover and put into this segment of writing and speaking. Students need to cover a lot of areas like general knowledge, general way of writing, a go-to structure for versatile writing, and much more to be able to write as many topics as they get to do. Talking about middle school, the stage is more formative, and it requires learning and good research to be able to write good quality content in their essays.

This blog has covered topics ranging from school, parental topics, government, animals, climate, sports, and much more. We hope that you will find topics versatile enough to practice your writing skills and ace it!

Jonathan Green, M.Ed.

Jonathan Green is an esteemed Education Specialist with an impressive track record. He holds a Master's degree in Education alongside bearing expertise in Child Psychology. He began his career as a special education teacher, gaining insights into diverse learning needs. His previous experience includes leading teacher training programs and authoring several papers on early childhood education. His extensive experience is reflected in his insightful articles and webinars. Outside of his professional life, Jonathan is an enthusiastic gardener and a volunteer at local community education centers.

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argument essay for middle school

How to Teach Argument Writing Step-By-Step

argument essay for middle school

No doubt, teaching argument writing to middle school students can be tricky. Even the word “argumentative” is off-putting, bringing to mind pointless bickering. But once I came up with argument writing lessons that were both fun and effective, I quickly saw the value in it. And so did my students.

You see, we teachers have an ace up our sleeve. It’s a known fact that from ages 11-14, kids love nothing more than to fire up a good ole battle royale with just about anybody within spitting distance.

Yup. So we’re going to use their powers of contradiction to OUR advantage by showing them how to use our argument writing lessons to power up their real-life persuasion skills. Your students will be knocking each other over in the hall to get to the room first!

I usually plan on taking about three weeks on the entire argument writing workshop. However, there are years when I’ve had to cut it down to two, and that works fine too.

Here are the step-by-step lessons I use to teach argument writing. It might be helpful to teachers who are new to teaching the argument, or to teachers who want to get back to the basics. If it seems formulaic, that’s because it is. In my experience, that’s the best way to get middle school students started.

Prior to Starting the Writer’s Workshop

A couple of weeks prior to starting your unit, assign some quick-write journal topics. I pick one current event topic a day, and I ask students to express their opinion about the topic.

Quick-writes get the kids thinking about what is going on in the world and makes choosing a topic easier later on.

Define Argumentative Writing

I’ll never forget the feeling of panic I had in 7th grade when my teacher told us to start writing an expository essay on snowstorms. How could I write an expository essay if I don’t even know what expository MEANS, I whined to my middle school self.

We can’t assume our students know or remember what argumentative writing is, even if we think they should know. So we have to tell them. Also, define claim and issue while you’re at it.

Establish Purpose

I always tell my students that learning to write an effective argument is key to learning critical thinking skills and is an important part of school AND real-life writing.

We start with a fictional scenario every kid in the history of kids can relate to.

ISSUE : a kid wants to stay up late to go to a party vs. AUDIENCE : the strict mom who likes to say no.

The “party” kid writes his mom a letter that starts with a thesis and a claim: I should be permitted to stay out late to attend the part for several reasons.

By going through this totally relatable scenario using a modified argumentative framework, I’m able to demonstrate the difference between persuasion and argument, the importance of data and factual evidence, and the value of a counterclaim and rebuttal.

Students love to debate whether or not strict mom should allow party kid to attend the party. More importantly, it’s a great way to introduce the art of the argument, because kids can see how they can use the skills to their personal advantage.

Persuasive Writing Differs From Argument Writing

At the middle school level, students need to understand persuasive and argument writing in a concrete way. Therefore, I keep it simple by explaining that both types of writing involve a claim. However, in persuasive writing, the supporting details are based on opinions, feelings, and emotions, while in argument writing the supporting details are based on researching factual evidence.

I give kids a few examples to see if they can tell the difference between argumentation and persuasion before we move on.

Argumentative Essay Terminology

In order to write a complete argumentative essay, students need to be familiar with some key terminology . Some teachers name the parts differently, so I try to give them more than one word if necessary:

  • thesis statement
  • bridge/warrant
  • counterclaim/counterargument*
  • turn-back/refutation

*If you follow Common Core Standards, the counterargument is not required for 6th-grade argument writing. All of the teachers in my school teach it anyway, and I’m thankful for that when the kids get to 7th grade.

Organizing the Argumentative Essay

I teach students how to write a step-by-step 5 paragraph argumentative essay consisting of the following:

  • Introduction : Includes a lead/hook, background information about the topic, and a thesis statement that includes the claim.
  • Body Paragraph #1 : Introduces the first reason that the claim is valid. Supports that reason with facts, examples, and/or data.
  • Body Paragraph #2 : The second reason the claim is valid. Supporting evidence as above.
  • Counterargument (Body Paragraph #3): Introduction of an opposing claim, then includes a turn-back to take the reader back to the original claim.
  • Conclusion : Restates the thesis statement, summarizes the main idea, and contains a strong concluding statement that might be a call to action.

Mentor Texts

If we want students to write a certain way, we should provide high-quality mentor texts that are exact models of what we expect them to write.

I know a lot of teachers will use picture books or editorials that present arguments for this, and I can get behind that. But only if specific exemplary essays are also used, and this is why.

If I want to learn Italian cooking, I’m not going to just watch the Romanos enjoy a holiday feast on Everybody Loves Raymond . I need to slow it down and follow every little step my girl Lidia Bastianich makes.

The same goes for teaching argument writing. If we want students to write 5 paragraph essays, that’s what we should show them.

In fact, don’t just display those mentor texts like a museum piece. Dissect the heck out of those essays. Pull them apart like a Thanksgiving turkey. Disassemble the essay sentence by sentence and have the kids label the parts and reassemble them. This is how they will learn how to structure their own writing.

Also, encourage your detectives to evaluate the evidence. Ask students to make note of how the authors use anecdotes, statistics, and facts. Have them evaluate the evidence and whether or not the writer fully analyzes it and connects it to the claim.

This is absolutely the best way for kids to understand the purpose of each part of the essay.

Research Time

Most of my students are not very experienced with performing research when we do this unit, so I ease them into it. (Our “big” research unit comes later in the year with our feature article unit .)

I start them off by showing this short video on how to find reliable sources. We use data collection sheets and our school library’s database for research. There are also some awesome, kid-friendly research sites listed on the Ask a Tech Teacher Blog .

Step-By-Step Drafting

The bedrock of drafting is to start with a solid graphic organizer. I have to differentiate for my writers, and I’ve found they have the most success when I offer three types of graphic organizers.

1- Least Support: This is your standard graphic organizer. It labels each paragraph and has a dedicated section for each part of the paragraph.

2- Moderate Support: This one has labels and sections, but also includes sentence stems for each sentence in the paragraph.

3- Most Support: This one has labels and sections and also includes fill-in-the-blank sentence frames . It’s perfect for my emerging writers, and as I’ve mentioned previously, students do NOT need the frames for long and soon become competent and independent writers.

Writing the Introduction

The introduction has three parts and purposes.

First, it has a hook or lead. While it should be about the topic, it shouldn’t state the writer’s position on the topic. I encourage students to start with a quote by a famous person, an unusual detail, a statistic, or a fact.

Kids will often try to start with a question, but I discourage that unless their question also includes one of the other strategies. Otherwise, I end up with 100 essays that start with, “Do you like sharks?” Lol

Next, it’s time to introduce the issue. This is the background information that readers need in order to understand the controversy.

Last, students should state the claim in the thesis statement. I call it a promise to the reader that the essay will deliver by proving that the claim is valid.

Writing the Supporting Body Paragraphs

Each supporting body paragraph should start with a topic sentence that introduces the idea and states the reason why the claim is valid. The following sentences in the paragraph should support that reason with facts, examples, data, or expert opinions. The bridge is the sentence that connects that piece of evidence to the argument’s claim. The concluding sentence should restate the reason.

Writing the Counterclaim Paragraph

The counterclaim paragraph is a very important aspect of argument writing. It’s where we introduce an opposing argument and then confidently take the reader back to the original argument. I tell students that it’s necessary to “get in the head” of the person who might not agree with their claim, by predicting their objections.

It can be tough for kids to “flip the switch” on their own argument, so I like to practice this a bit. I give them several pairs of transitions that go together to form a counterclaim and rebuttal. I also switch up what I call this part so that they use the terminology interchangeably.

  • It might seem that [ counterargument . ]However, [ turn-back .]
  • Opponents may argue that [ counterargument .] Nevertheless, [ turn back .]
  • A common argument against this position is [ counterargument .] Yet, [ turn-back .]

A great way for kids to practice this is to have them work with partners to write a few counterarguments together. I let them practice by giving them easy role-playing topics.

  • Your cousins want to jump into a poison ivy grove for a TikTok challenge. Choose your position on this and write a counterargument and turn-back.
  • Your friend wants to get a full-face tattoo of their boyfriend’s name. Choose your position on this and write a counterargument and turn-back.

This kind of practice makes the counterargument much more clear.

The concluding paragraph should remind the reader of what was argued in the essay and why it matters. It might also suggest solutions or further research that could be done on the topic. Or students can write a call to action that asks the reader to perform an action in regard to the information they’ve just learned.

My students write about local issues and then turn the essays into letters to our superintendent, school board, or state senators. It’s an amazing way to empower kids and to show them that their opinion matters. I’ve written about that here and I’ve included the sentence frames for the letters in my argumentative writing unit.

I hope this gives you a good overview of teaching argument writing. Please leave any questions below. Please also share your ideas, because we all need all the help we can give each other!

And one more thing. Don’t be surprised if parents start asking you to tone down the unit because it’s become harder to tell their kids why they can’t stay up late for parties. 🙂

Stay delicious!

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100 Thought-Provoking Argumentative Writing Prompts for Kids and Teens

Practice making well-reasoned arguments using research and facts.

Parents should be punished for their minor children’s crimes.

Writing a strong argumentative essay teaches students to make a case for their own point of view without relying on emotion or passion. These argumentative essay topics provide options for kids of all ages, including controversial subjects and some that are just for fun.

School and Education Argumentative Essay Topics

Science and history argumentative essay topics, life and ethics argumentative essay topics, social justice and civics argumentative essay topics, more argumentative essay topics, what’s the difference between argumentative and persuasive essays.

These two types of essays are similar, but there are some subtle and important differences .

  • Author’s purpose: In an argumentative essay, your job is to simply convince the reader that the point of view you’re presenting is valid, even if it doesn’t change their mind. Persuasive essays seek to sway the reader to adopt your point of view over any others.
  • Method: Argumentative essays rely heavily on well-researched facts and logical assertions. In a persuasive essay, the writer may use a blend of emotion and facts to win over the reader.
  • Audience: Persuasive essays require a specific audience, since the writer must acknowledge and attempt to overcome their potential objections. The writer of an argumentative essay is simply making a statement, so knowing their audience is less important.
  • Viewpoint: A persuasive essay writer should believe their point of view is the only correct one, and try to persuade the reader to agree. Argumentative essays acknowledge other points of view, but use reason and logic to argue that the writer’s point of view is best.

Persuasive and argumentative essay topics often overlap. The difference is in how the writer approaches the topic. When you assign one of the topics below as an argumentative essay, remind students to use research, reason, and logic to make a strong but dispassionate argument.

  • Should physical education be part of the standard high school curriculum?
  • Schools should require recommended vaccines for all students, with very limited exceptions.
  • Should all students have the ability to attend college for free?
  • What one class should all high schools students be required to take and pass in order to graduate?

What one class should all high schools students be required to take and pass in order to graduate?

  • Do you think homework should be required, optional, or not given at all?
  • Students should/should not be able to use their phones during the school day.
  • Should schools have dress codes?
  • If I could change one school rule, it would be …
  • Is year-round school a good idea?
  • Which is better, private schools or public schools?
  • Should every student have to participate in athletics?
  • Do you think schools should ban junk food from their cafeterias?
  • Should students be required to volunteer in their communities?
  • What is the most important school subject?
  • Are letter grades helpful, or should we replace them with something else?

Are letter grades helpful, or should we replace them with something else?

  • Should schools be allowed to ban some books from their libraries?
  • Which is better, book smarts or street smarts?
  • Are single-gender schools better or worse for students?
  • Are computers making teachers obsolete?
  • Students who fail a test should be given a chance to take it again.
  • Is it acceptable to use animals for experiments and research?
  • Vaping is less harmful than smoking tobacco.
  • Do we really learn anything from history, or does it just repeat itself over and over?
  • Is it OK to keep animals in zoos?
  • Should we ban plastic bags and bottles?
  • Should we still consider Pluto a planet?

Should we still consider Pluto a planet?

  • It’s important to spend tax dollars exploring space, instead of on other things.
  • Is there life on other planets?
  • Who was the best/worst American president?
  • Should vaccines be mandatory?
  • Are GMOs more helpful than harmful?
  • Is animal cloning ethical?
  • Should human cloning be legal?
  • Should we use stem cells from human embryos for scientific research?
  • Is it better to provide drug addicts with treatment instead of punishment?

Is it better to provide drug addicts with treatment instead of punishment?

  • Should we ban the use of fossil fuels?
  • Can we truly do anything about human-caused global warming?
  • Are electric vehicles better than gas-powered ones?
  • Was life really better “back in the day”?
  • Choose a foreign conflict (e.g., Vietnam or Afghanistan) and argue whether or not the United States was justified in getting involved.
  • The most important challenge our country is currently facing is … (e.g., immigration, gun control, economy)
  • Does social media do more harm than good?
  • The best country in the world is …
  • Are men and women treated equally?
  • Is it better to be vegetarian/vegan than to eat meat?
  • Should little kids be allowed to play competitive sports?
  • Who faces more peer pressure, girls or boys?
  • Should kids have set bedtimes or just go to bed whenever they’re sleepy?

Should kids have set bedtimes or just go to bed whenever they’re sleepy?

  • Which is better, artificial Christmas trees or real ones?
  • Playing violent video games is bad for kids and teens.
  • Parents should track their kids using their cell phones.
  • Are paper books better than e-books?
  • All kids should play on the same sports teams, regardless of gender.
  • All paper documents should be replaced with electronic versions.
  • Is conflict necessary for change?
  • Is war ever justified?
  • A strong middle class is vital to the economy.

A strong middle class is vital to the economy.

  • Is the local minimum wage truly a living wage?
  • Should we do away with gender-specific public bathrooms?
  • Is a progressive income tax better than a flat tax?
  • Capital punishment does/does not deter crime.
  • Would it be better to legalize, tax, and regulate all drugs (including alcohol and cigarettes) instead of banning them?
  • Parents should be punished for their minor children’s crimes.

Parents should be punished for their minor children’s crimes.

  • The government should provide free internet access for every citizen.
  • Is democracy the best form of government?
  • Is capitalism the best form of economy?
  • Should all Americans be required to vote?
  • Should we change the minimum driving age in the United States?
  • Do you think the government should find a way to provide free health care for everyone?
  • School-age children should be allowed to vote.
  • We should/should not abolish the electoral college.
  • Are “Stand Your Ground” laws effective?
  • Supreme Court judges should be appointed for fixed terms.

Supreme Court judges should be appointed for fixed terms.

  • Does segregation still exist in the United States?
  • We should/should not continue building a wall between the United States and Mexico.
  • Will stricter gun control laws help control mass shootings?
  • Should we make the path to American citizenship easier?
  • Is the American justice system inherently racist?
  • Should we redirect some or all police force funding to social services?
  • Should the United States implement a universal basic income?
  • Choose a fictional character and explain why they should be the next president.
  • What animal makes the best pet?
  • Who is the world’s best athlete, present or past?
  • Which is better, reading books or watching TV?
  • Is a taco a sandwich?
  • Should kids be allowed to stay up as late as they want?

Should kids be allowed to stay up as late as they want?

  • What’s the best video game system?
  • Kids shouldn’t have to go to school on their birthdays.
  • Is video gaming a sport?
  • Are beauty pageants sexist?
  • Should kids get participation trophies for sports?
  • Are stereotypes ever right?
  • Is there any benefit to teaching proper grammar and spelling, or should we allow language to be descriptive instead of prescriptive?
  • All teenagers should have part-time jobs.
  • Should kids have limits on screen time?
  • Is it better to read fiction or nonfiction?
  • Should kids have to eat everything on their plate, even if they really don’t like something?

Should kids have to eat everything on their plate, even if they really don't like something?

  • Is it better to spend an hour a day reading or exercising?
  • Is graffiti an act of vandalism or an art form?
  • Should society hold celebrities to a high moral standard?

What are your favorite argumentative writing prompts? Come share your thoughts in the WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook .

Also check out 100 intriguing cause and effect essay topics for students ..

Use these thought-provoking argumentative essay topics to teach students to write well-researched and convincing compositions.

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20+ Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School to Get Started

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by  Antony W

May 31, 2023

argumentative essay topics for middle school

An argumentative essay for middle school focuses on issues surrounding students in primary and secondary schools. And given that there are numerous topics to cover within this scope, it’s important to focus on an area you can fully explore.

To be clear, choosing the best topic to argue is the first step to writing an argumentative essay of this nature. Get the topic wrong and your essay won’t read any different from what other students hand in for review.

We’ve put together as a list of interesting topics about middle school from which you can choose an argument to explore in your essay.

Key Takeaways

  • There are hundreds of topics to choose, but you only have to choose what you’d find interesting to explore.
  • Preliminary research can help you to determine whether you can construct a solid argument around a topic of choice. 
  • This post includes a handful of ideas for middle school argumentative essays. You can pick a topic you find interesting and explore it further in your writing.

20+ Middle School Argumentative Essay Topics

Once you identify a suitable topic from the following list, it should be easy for you to write your argument from start to finish.

Social Essay Topics for Middle School

  • Should Internet access be a basic human right in middle school?
  • Is affirmative action an effective way to address historical and ongoing discrimination against minorities?
  • Are girls or boys more subject to gender stereotypes?
  • Should schools be legally required to take more action to prevent bullying, and what are the most effective strategies?
  • Should the governments have the legal right to monitor individuals for national security purposes?
  • Should official forms and documents provide more options than just “male” and “female” when asking about gender?
  • Should religion be a factor in political decision-making, and if so, to what extent?
  • To what extent should schools be responsible for accommodating students with food allergies, and what policies are most effective for doing so?

Education Topics for Middle School

  • Students should choose their own courses and educational paths regardless of their academic performance in medical school. 
  • Is the Common Core curriculum effective in achieving its goals?
  • Arts education should have equal weight with other subjects in the curriculum
  • Should students be required to learn a second language in school?

Get an argumentative essay centered on middle school topics written for you. Place your order here , get up to 15% discount, and benefit from the convenience of our custom writing.

Media and Entertainment Essay Topics

  • To what extent does reality TV accurately depict real life, and how does this affect viewers’ perceptions of the world?
  • Is pop culture a valuable aspect of society, or does it contribute to harmful societal trends?
  • Should parents have the right to monitor their children’s Internet and social media usage?
  • The government should ban Photoshopped magazine covers banned and set criteria for determining what constitutes an unacceptable level of manipulation.
  • Do celebrities forfeit their right to privacy by choosing to live in the public eye?

Health and Wellness Essay Topics

  • To what extent do Americans have a healthy diet, and what are the consequences of unhealthy eating habits for individuals and society as a whole?
  • Are participation trophies a valuable way to boost children’s self-esteem or do they undermine the importance of achievement?
  • To what extent should children’s screen time be restricted, and what are the potential benefits and drawbacks of different approaches to limiting it?
  • Should the government outlaw cigarettes, and what are the potential consequences and challenges of doing so?

Our argument writers are only a click away to help you get the best paper for middle school written and delivered on time. Get in touch with us and benefit from the convenience of custom writing.

Middle School Essay Topics on Environment

  • What actions can households take to conserve energy, and how can governments encourage and support these efforts?
  • Is climate change real and caused by human activity, and what policies are most effective in mitigating its effects?

Ethics and Morality

  • Do violent video games make people more likely to be violent in real life?
  • Does nature or nurture play a bigger role in who we are?
  • Is it immoral to download copyrighted content illegally—or is it something that is a violation of the law, but not an issue of ethics?
  • Do athletes, celebrities, and CEOs deserve to make more money than the average person does?

General Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School

  • Do anti-discrimination laws help or harm our society?
  • Should the government increase efforts to combat human trafficking?
  • Should illegal immigrants have the same rights as nationalized citizens?
  • Is America ready for a female president? Explain your opinion.
  • Is it ethical to keep wild animals as pets if the owner can care for them properly?
  • Do you support physician-assisted suicide in the case of terminal illness?
  • What is the appropriate age for children to begin using social media?
  • Should high school seniors be required to take a civics exam before graduating?
  • Should the government enforce stricter gun control policies?
  • Does the government promote hate or love when addressing racism?
  • Should employers require a Covid-19 vaccine for their employees?
  • Do electronic voting machines make the election process fair or unfair?
  • Should politicians have term limits?
  • Is climate change a problem that we can solve, or is it too large for us to manage?
  • Should churches continue to be exempt from paying taxes due to the separation of church and state?
  • Has artificial intelligence gone too far? Explain your opinion.
  • Should public education at the college level be free of tuition?
  • Should the government have the power to determine which books are allowed in classrooms?

About the author 

Antony W is a professional writer and coach at Help for Assessment. He spends countless hours every day researching and writing great content filled with expert advice on how to write engaging essays, research papers, and assignments.

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45 Argumentative Writing Prompts for Middle School

As students make their way through school, the types of writing they do will change—as will the difficulty.

Writing persuasive or argumentative essays and letters is a great skill for students to learn, and a wonderful way to help guide them on proper research techniques so they can view more than one opinion and form their own conclusions.

Below, we’ve put together a list of writing prompts to help students tackle persuasive writing and dig deeper for an opinion.

Using These Prompts

This writing guide can be used as homework or in tandem with your ELA curriculum. The point is to get students to work on their nonfiction writing skills in a way that is fun and engaging.

Here are a few ways you can use the list below:

  • Use these prompts for students who finish work early and need something to do.
  • To choose a prompt, have students pick a number between 1 and 45.
  • Challenge your students to use one writing prompt every day for a full week.
  • Pick prompts that line up with what students are learning in other classes (like history or art).
  • Have each student pick a prompt for someone else in the class to use.

The Prompts

  • Do you think teachers should assign homework over the weekend? Explain.
  • Is America ready to have a woman president? Why or why not?
  • Should kids have chores? Explain.
  •  Should GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) be allowed in our food?
  • Is life more challenging for your generation than your parents’ generation at your age? Explain.
  • Should gym class be required for all students?
  • Do you think your school treats boys and girls equally? Explain.
  • Do athletes and actors deserve to make more money than the average worker? Explain.
  • Do beauty pageants objectify the participants?
  • Should teachers accept late work? Explain.
  • Should cell phones be allowed in school? Why?
  • Do you think community college should be free? Explain.
  • Should schools have harsher punishments for bullies?
  • Does snail mail (handwritten cards or letters) still have value in the digital age?
  • Do you think parents should limit screen time for their children?
  • Should a student’s behavior be a factor in their overall grade in a class?
  • Explain your stance on alternative energy.
  • Do you think the media puts too much pressure on high school and college athletes?
  • At what age do you think kids should be allowed to use social media?
  • Do you think Native Americans have had justice for having their land stolen?
  • Should the US invest more money in the space program, or should that money be spent elsewhere?
  • Does society rely too heavily on technology?
  • Should single-use plastics be eliminated entirely?
  • Do you think students should be given letter grades, or should classes be graded as pass/fail?
  • Explain the benefits of learning a second language.
  • Does your school mascot represent your school well?
  • If your school mascot could be changed, what would you propose? Why?
  • Defend your position on recreational hunting.
  • Explain the benefits of going away to summer camp.
  • Do you think there is anything we can do about climate change, or is it already too late?
  • Explain why students should have more say in what they learn.
  • What do you think is the perfect pet?
  • Is online learning or in-person learning better? Why?
  • How has reality TV had an impact on real life?
  • At what age are you old enough to stay home alone?
  • Should children be required to attend church with their families? Explain your reasoning.
  • Do you think the dress code is harmful or helpful to daily school life?
  • Is it better to be liked or to be respected?
  • Should school start later for teenagers?
  • Should students be required to participate in a sport or extracurricular activity?
  • Is the glass half-empty or half-full? Explain.
  • Should the United States keep daylight savings time, or do away with it?
  • What is something every household should do to conserve energy?
  • Should beauty standards be more inclusive?
  • What is the greatest song of all time? Explain.

Looking For More Resources?

We offer an abundance of free writing resources for parents, guardians, and teachers to help give young writers the tools they need to succeed.

Don’t hesitate to reach out if you are looking for something specific and can’t find it on our site. We love hearing all of your ideas!

argument essay for middle school

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A Selection Of Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School

The argumentative essay lessons begin in middle school, when the young minds are ready to start defending ideas with logic and reason. Even though the classes talk about serious educational content, middle school students still love to have fun. For argumentative essays to be taken seriously, the topics need to be geared toward those young minds. Here are some topic ideas that will get the creativity and arguments flowing:

Young teens enjoy writing about their school experiences.

  • Should students in middle school be tested for drugs?
  • Are too many students in your school getting A’s?
  • Should every student be required to take gym and music classes?
  • Should your teachers use more group work in their classes?
  • Should the school day be longer so you can go to school for four days instead of five?
  • What should be done with bullies and cyberbullies?
  • Should corporal punishment be reinstituted in schools?
  • Should schools have more dances?
  • Should students be able to choose their own schedules?
  • Do class sizes affect the success of students?

Students are interested in entertainment.

  • Does TV need more diverse actors and actresses?
  • Does TV still matter?
  • What musician will be the next legendary performer?
  • Is video gaming a sport?
  • What makes a television commercial a hit?
  • What are three best movies of the year?
  • Do TV shows promote risky behavior?
  • What children’s book characters could be the next TV hit?

Sports is always a good topic for junior high students.

  • Is football too violent to be a part of school athletics?
  • Should college athletes get paid?
  • Is baseball still a relevant sport?
  • Is cheerleading a sport?
  • Should athletic organizations establish rules for coaches about the way the talk to players?
  • Are travel sports necessary?

Junior high students love their technology as much as high school students do.

  • What is the right age to get a cell phone?
  • Should students be allowed to have cell phones in class?
  • Do you have more good friends or fewer because of technology?
  • Do people use their smartphones for useful reasons or to waste time?
  • What is the next social media platform that will be popular?
  • Is online learning or face-to-face learning better?
  • Should companies be allowed to collect information about your spending habits?
  • Are printed books or ebooks better?
  • Are online product reviews reliable?
  • How much time should people spend on social media each day?

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argument essay for middle school

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Teaching argumentative writing in middle school ela: part one.

If you teach middle school, you know that teenagers have a lot of opinions! Luckily, you can use that to your advantage when teaching students how to write an argumentative essay. The key is to help students learn to craft well-written arguments with evidence (not just arguing for the sake of it, which middle schoolers can be prone to). 

While learning to craft argumentative essays will help students in school, being able to craft and defend an argument is also an important skill for the real world. Writing an argumentative essay or having a debate requires critical thinking skills and the ability to take a stance and back it up. 

argument essay for middle school

What is Argumentative Writing?

In order for students to understand how to write an argumentative essay, they need to understand what argumentative writing is.

Argumentative essays usually require that students do some investigation or research on a topic and then choose a clear stance. When writing, students will spend the body of the essay explaining points and providing evidence that supports their stance. A counterargument is also typically given as a way to counteract how “nay-sayers” would disagree with the writer. At the end of the essay, students will restate their argument and summarize their evidence.

How to Introduce Argumentative Writing: The Debate

Now that we know what to expect from argumentative writing, we can get into how to write an argumentative essay. You’ll want to start by introducing argumentative writing, which I liked to do through debates. Just like in an essay, to successfully debate a topic, students must do some investigation, choose a stance, and then argue their point in a meaningful way. Holding a class debate is a great place to start when introducing argumentative writing. Debating a topic verbally can actually be used as a brainstorming session before students ever even put pen to paper. For students new to argumentative writing, this takes some of the pressure off of jumping right into the writing process and helps them generate ideas.

There are a few ways you can use debates. For instance, you can choose a topic you’d like students to debate or let them choose a topic they’re already passionate about. 

I liked to give students a few minutes to think through the topic and prep on their own, and then I partner them up. They can either debate the topic with their partner, or they can work together with their partner to debate another pair. 

Depending on your class size, you could also split the class in half and make it a whole group debate. As long as students are researching or investigating in some way, choosing a stance, and finding reasons to back up their position, there is no wrong way to hold a debate in your class – and you can try out a few different formats to see what works best.

After the debates, it’s a great idea to debrief. This is a good time to bring in some key vocabulary and reinforce how to write an argumentative essay. For example, you can look over some of the evidence presented and ask students to rate the “strength” of the argument. You can also brainstorm a counterargument together.

argument essay for middle school

How to Introduce Argumentative Writing: The Flash Draft

After students debate, they move on to the flash draft. A flash draft is essentially a giant brain dump. Students do not have to worry about spelling, grammar, organization, or even structure. They will simply be taking their thoughts from the debate and getting them down on paper. 

One benefit to the flash draft is it removes the barrier of intimidation for a lot of students. For many kids, the actual work of starting to write can be daunting. A flash draft removes that intimidation of perfection and just requires something to be on the page. Again, the flash draft portion can be completely tailored to best suit your students and classroom. You can set a timer for a specific amount of time, you can provide students with an outline or guiding questions, or you can give them sentence stems to start. 

If you have access to technology in your classroom, you can even let students verbalize their flash draft and use transcription technology to get it on paper. 

Expanding Knowledge of Argumentative Writing

By now, you might be wondering when you’ll actually dive deeper into how to write an argumentative essay. That will start with a mini-lesson. These mini-lessons should cover the key parts of argumentative essays, like how to take a stance, ways to support your position, how to transition between thoughts, and even how to craft a counterargument. 

You could have a mini-lesson before each flash draft to focus on a particular skill, or you can hold the mini-lesson after the flash draft and let students focus on that skill during revisions. During mini-lessons, I highly suggest using mentor texts, guided examples, or other reference materials. When it comes to writing, many students need to see the process in action, so modeling and having a place for them to reference will be super key to their success.

argument essay for middle school

Argumentative Writing Unit for Middle School 

Want support putting together your argumentative essay unit? My done-for-you Argumentative Writing Unit scaffolds how to write an argumentative essay for you and your students.

The unit includes 23 full lesson plans, slide presentations, notebook pages for students, teacher keys and examples, student references pages, and more for a well-rounded unit.

Plus, this unit goes through the exact process I talked about in the blog, using debate, flash drafts, and mini-lessons to scaffold students through the writing process.

argument essay for middle school

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by Michelle Boyd Waters, M.Ed.  

A Plethora Of Writing Examples For Middle School (& High School)

October 14, 2014 in  Pedagogy

Middle School Writing Samples

When I started my first job as a professional newspaper reporter (This job also served as an internship during my junior year in college — I just didn’t leave for about 6 years.), I quickly realized that all my experience, and all my years of journalism education had not been enough to help me write stories about drug busts, fatal car accidents and tornadoes. All the theoretical work I’d done, and all of the nifty little scholastic and collegiate stories I had done, did not prepare me for real world writing.

At that point, I had to find a solution quickly. After all, I had a deadline to meet, and it was only a few hours away.

One of my colleagues, who also served as a mentor, had the solution. She introduced me to the newspaper’s “morgue.” This was a room filled with filing cabinets in which we kept old — dead — stories arranged by reporter. Whenever I wasn’t’ sure how to write a story, all I had to do was check the morgue for similar stories. If I needed to write a story about a local drug bust, for example, I’d find another story on a similar incident, study its structure, and mentally create a formula in which to plugin the information I’d gathered.

Once I’d gained more experience, and had internalized the formula for that particular type of story, I felt free to branch out as the situation — and my training — warranted.

I do the same thing when I want to write a type of letter, brochure, or report that I’ve never written before.

This is what writing looks like in the real world.

Of course, if you’re a new teacher like me, there is one problem with providing mentor texts to my students: I have a dearth of middle school level writing sitting around in my file cabinets.

Fortunately, the Internet is full of sources, so I scoured the bowels of Google to find examples. I know how busy you are, so I’m sharing.

Expository writing examples for middle school

Below are several sources of expository writing samples for middle school students.

  • The Write Source Expository Writing Samples
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Expository Essay Models

Finally, here is an article in the New York Times that will help you teach your students  real-world expository writing skills .

Descriptive writing examples for middle school

  • Descriptive Writing Samples from Novels
  • Milwaukee Public Schools Descriptive Essay Samples (p. 137)
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Descriptive Essay Models

Narrative writing examples for middle school

  • Writing Samples by Steve Peha (PDF)
  • The Write Source Narrative Writing Samples
  • Oregon Department of Education Scored Writing Samples (Ideas and Organization)
  • Oregon Department of Education Scored Writing Samples (Sentence Fluency and Conventions)
  • Oregon Department of Education Scored Writing Samples (Voice and Word Choice)
  • Oregon Department of Education High School Scored Narrative and Argumentative Writing Samples
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Narrative Essay Models

Argumentative/persuasive writing examples for middle school

  • The Write Source Persuasive Writing Samples
  • Holt, Rinehart, Winston Persuasive Essay Models

Reflective writing examples for middle school

  • Reflective essay examples from Lake Washington Girls Middle School

If you know of any other online writing example sources, please feel free to share them in the comments below.

Related topics: Argumentative Writing , Informative Writing , Mentor Texts , Narrative Writing

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About the author 

Michelle Boyd Waters, M.Ed.

I am a secondary English Language Arts teacher, a University of Oklahoma student working on my doctorate in Instructional Leadership and Academic Curriculum with an concentration in English Education and co-Editor of the Oklahoma English Journal. I am constantly seeking ways to amplify students' voices and choices.

This is very, very helpful. Thank you for sharing!

As a new middle school teacher (coming from elementary) this was very helpful and encouraging.

Thank you very much for letting me know. I’m glad that I was able to help you!

Thank you! I’m glad I can help.

Your welcome

This is super helpful. Thank you!

These links are a fantastic help. Thank you!

This helped me BUNCHES! Thanks so much!

thanks so much!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! XD

These links are now dead 🙁

Thank you for notifying me! I have updated the post to include new (live!) links. Some of them are geared towards high school, but I think we can still use them as exemplars of what we want our students to aim for.

Comments are closed.

argument essay for middle school

8 Highly Engaging (and Controversial) Argumentative Mentor Texts for Middle and High School

This podcast and website cost money to maintain. I enjoy providing free support for as many teachers as I can but I also have to pay the bills.

The best way you can support the work I do is by purchasing one of my resources or one of my courses here .

Not only will you help support the work I do, you’ll also benefit a lot too! Everything I create for teachers is high quality, easy to follow, and editable. I’ve also tested all these resources with hundreds of students and are incredibly effective for increasing engagement in your classroom.

Since you are listening/reading this episode you might consider investing in my Argumentative Writing Unit.

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Any English teacher can tell you that argumentative essays written by students are more often than not, dry, dull, and formulaic. I’m here to tell you, it’s not our students’ fault. The writing units most teachers follow to teach argument essays are dry, dull, and formulaic.

Common core standards require that teachers prioritize the core concepts of argument writing such as the writing process, thesis statement, claim statement, reasoning, evidence, and the annotated bibliography. Teachers have to use a step-by-step process because students need these foundations.

In all the years I’ve been an English teacher I have found that writing surpasses expectations when students have a purpose for writing and are given permission to write with voice and passion about high-interest topics.

In a highly engaged English classroom argument essay writing is forgotten. Making a positive change and real-life application are infused into the lesson plan when students begin to care. Argumentative writing units can become opportunities for learning about current events, participating in discussions about issues students face in their daily lives, and making an impact in the community. If you are interested in a unit that prioritize these things then check out blog post about The Absolute Best Way to Start an Argumentative Writing Unit .

One of the best ways to help students discover their passion, voice, and purpose is through highly engaging mentor texts. In this blog post I have put together a variety of mentor texts or persuasive pieces about topics I believe students need to know about and that they have strong opinions about. These topics range from how to cope with death to the spread of misinformation about ADHD on TikTok. English teachers have the power to help students develop their background knowledge about societal issues and think critically about how to approach them. In addition to each mentor text, I’ve also included skills you could teach with the mentor text and discussion questions. Teachers can read the article(s) aloud and have students form small groups to discuss the questions. If students are comfortable sharing their own opinion to the whole class. Check out this blog post with 15 Ways to Engage Students in Meaningful Discussions .

Please note, each mentor text article should be vetted based on the maturity level of your students and their reading levels. Some of the articles may be above the reading level of middle school students. For this reason, I recommend reading the entire mentor text aloud on a separate day before using it to teach a writing skill. You might also consider utilize a graphic organizer for writing definitions for key vocabulary within the articles. There are many different ways you can use these mentor texts in your class, feel free to get creative! You might even do a jigsaw activity where small groups read different articles and summarize them to their group members.

1. What to Say When You Meet the Angel of Death at a Party

Loss is a taboo topic in schools and it shouldn’t be because eventually everyone experiences loss in their lives. When a student or teacher experiences loss, the pain radiates out into the community. Most who aren’t directly connected to the person who died, don’t know what to say or how to help. This article is written by a woman who faces death every day because she is living with stage IV cancer. She writes truthfully about her experiences being so close to death. She describes how people around her become uncomfortable when confronted with their mortality because of her cancer diagnosis.

“To so many people, I am no longer just myself. I am a reminder of a thought that is difficult for the rational brain to accept: that the elements that constitute our bodies might fail at any moment. When I originally got my diagnosis at age 35, all I could think to say was, ‘But I have a son.’ It was the best argument I had. I can’t end. This world can’t end. It had just begun.”

Although, the article may be too mature for some students, it’s still a high quality, high interest piece of argumentation. The author is making suggestions to people about what not to say to someone experiencing loss. It can be utilized to teach students that arguing a point doesn’t have to be formulaic or lacking in narrative. This article provides an opportunity for students to discuss this fairly taboo topic and also learn the important skill of writing with voice while weaving in a narrative. Here are some other ways you can utilize this article:

Writing Skills

  • Point of View
  • Narrative Writing
  • Figurative Language
  • Writing Style

Reflection/Discussion Questions

  • What do you think the author means with this figurative language? “A tragedy is like a fault line. A life is split into a before and an after, and most of the time, the before was better.”
  • What is the author suggesting we say when we meet the angel of death at a party?
  • What is the point the author is trying to make? What’s her claim?
  • What do you think the author means by this? “Some people give you their heartbreak like a gift”

2. The Myth of the Normal Brain: Embracing Neurodiversity

Students deserve to know that labels such as dyslexia, ADHD, and autism are being reevaluated. For a long time these terms have been associated with negative and deficit based ideas. This persuasive text makes the important point that people with mental “disorders” such as autism, ADHD, dyslexia, down syndrome, and other diagnosis have been found to have strengths and gifts associated with the “disorder”. The author argues that these mental differences may have actually been selected over time through evolution because they benefited humankind over many thousands of years!

  • Compare and contrast (in the intro)
  • Bibliography
  • Counter argument

Discussion Questions

  • What are some examples of evolutionary advantages that humans have developed?
  • Do you think the term “disorder” when describing ADHD, OCD, or autism needs to be changed, why or why not?
  • How might labels for mental health conditions be helpful, how might they be hurtful?
  • “There is no normal flower or culture. Similarly, we ought to accept the fact that there is no normal brain or mind.” Do you agree or disagree with these statements?

3. Misleading videos about ADHD are being widely disseminated on TikTok, study finds

Did you know that #adhd is the seventh most popular hashtag on TikTok? This article presents a study done to find out if this rise in popularity and information about ADHD on the social media platform may be causing the spread of misinformation as well. The findings were that 52% of the TikTok videos were misleading! This article is an excellent one to analyze the argumentation skills listed below and teach students about misinformation on the internet.

  • Summarizing (the research study)
  • Embedding Quotes
  • Identifying the Claim (the spread of misinformation about ADHD is pervasive on social media platforms like TikTok)
  • Organizational Structure (summary of study and interview)
  • “Most of these misleading videos oversimplified ADHD, recommended incorrect treatments, or wrongly attributed symptoms of other psychiatric disorders as being a symptom ADHD.” Have you seen videos like the ones described in this quote on social media?
  • What consequences do you think the spread of misinformation has?
  • What consequences do you think hitting the like button on a piece of content that spreads misinformation has?
  • This quote below describes advertisements on TikTok attempting to get kids to self-diagnose with ADHD using oversimplified symptoms such as being too chatty. The goal? To make money.“There has recently been serious concerns raised in the media about predatory advertisements about ADHD on TikTok, made by for-profit telehealth companies. Some of these advertisements were pulled from TikTok, and we do not have access or a way to search for these videos.” What other companies or advertisements have you seen that seem to target and make a profit from children?

4. The Climate Book: Greta Thunberg’s ‘impassioned anthology’ on climate change

Greta Thunberg, who has autism, was only around 11 when she started speaking up about climate change. Now she’s one of the leading advocates for taking action now to stop the climate change crisis. This article is a summary of her newest book (she’s written many!), The Climate Book. I haven’t read Greta Thunberg’s new book (yet) but after reading this article I can tell the book is a stellar example of argumentative writing at its finest. The article paints a bleak picture so make sure to read it first before reading it with students. Some students may be very sensitive about these scary topics related to our planet becoming uninhabitable eventually. You may even allow students to opt out of the lesson and do an alternative activity.

  • Rhetoric (specifically ethos because of all the experts featured in the book)
  • Embedding quotes (from the book and interviews)
  • Summarizing (the book)
  • Citing other articles
  • Are there any issues you feel passionate enough about to lead a school strike?
  • Why do you think it might be challenging for kids to speak up about issues that society faces and that they care about?
  • What support do you think a kid would need to speak out, organize a strike, publish a book, or give a speech about an issue?

5. Drug Education Curriculum Moves Beyond ‘Just Say No’ to Teach Harm Reduction

  • Informative vs. Argumentative Writing
  • Summarizing (the new curriculum)
  • Quoting a Text (the curriculum)
  • Do you believe just say no or harm reduction should be taught to students? Why?
  • The article discusses some of the critical thinking skills taught in this new curriculum. Do you ever ask these questions about the websites and articles you find online? Such as, does the author have an agenda? If you have, what kind of “agendas” do you think authors online might have?
  • What skills do you believe would be most helpful for students when navigating the issue of drugs in their every day lives?

6. Don’t Ban ChatGPT in Schools. Teach With It.

I can’t have a collection of controversial articles without including an article on the topic of ChatGPT. If you are a regular reader of this blog or listener to the podcast, you know how I feel about ChatGPT: this tool will change teaching…for the better. In fact, that’s the claim of the article above. Yep, I’m definitely biased on the topic of ChatGPT. You may be too, it is a controversial topic and controversial topics have extreme sides. So, I’d recommend pairing this article with one that has a claim for the other side: ChatGPT is not a tool for learning. It must be banned in class. After reading each article students can write why they side with one argument or the other, or have an entirely different view.

  • Counterargument
  • Engaging title
  • Where do you stand on the issue of using ChatGPT in schools?
  • In what ways could ChatGPT be harmful in schools?
  • In what ways could ChatGPT be helpful in schools?
  • How might ChatGPT be used to improve student writing?

7. Schools Say No to Cell Phones in Class But Is It a Smart Move?

This is a lengthy article detailing the ins and outs of why banning cell phones in school doesn’t work very well. It’s informative and includes many reasons for why banning cell phones is problematic. It’s very convincing and analyzing why would really help students understand how to argue their point in convincing ways too. It could also be really beneficial for students to read an article arguing the opposing point. This article, Should cell phones be banned in American classrooms? includes a study that showed kids in schools that banned cell phones had better test scores.

  • Once Sentence Emphasis
  • Do you believe cell phones should be banned in schools? Why or why not?
  • After reading both articles, which school would you feel more calm in? A school that banned cell phones or a school that did not?
  • “They are feeding an addiction and stunting students’ development of face-to-face communication skills”. Do you believe cell phones do these things? Why or why not?

8. Are Video Games Really Addictive?

This article discusses the ins and outs of the argument that video games are addictive. The author’s claim is that they are not. It’s very convincing because of statistics like this: “But video game-playing is rarely addictive. That makes it a very different animal from, say, gambling or binge eating. Experts estimate that problematic play is  exhibited  by 0.5% of the general population and less than 1.0% of adult gamers.” The article is another excellent example of argumentation about a highly engaging topic for students!

  • Anecdote Hook
  • Counterarguments
  • Asking Questions
  • What is the author’s claim and reasoning to support that claim? Identify these parts of the article.
  • Why do you think video games are so appealing? Does everyone like them?

Teaching argumentative writing can get dry and dull fast resulting in decreased engagement. Utilizing well-written mentor texts about critical high interest topics is a great way to teach your entire argumentative essay unit while also engaging students in real conversations, critical thinking, and close reading.

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argument essay for middle school

Argumentative Essay Guide

Argumentative Essay Examples

Nova A.

Argumentative Essay Examples: Samples & Tips

11 min read

argumentative essay examples

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Have you ever found yourself staring at a blank page, overwhelmed by the thought of composing a powerful argumentative essay ? You're not alone!

Many students encounter the same daunting challenge – how to present a persuasive argument that captivates their audience and drives their point home. Without a clear strategy, it's easy to get lost in a sea of words, leaving your message directionless and your audience unimpressed.

But fear not, for this blog is your roadmap to success!

We're here to provide a number of examples and tips to help you craft compelling arguments, empowering you to tackle your essays with confidence. 

By the end, you'll not only understand the key principles of argumentation but also know how to apply them effectively in writing essays.

So read on to find great examples and master the art of writing a good argumentative essay!

Argumentative essay structure example

  • 1. Free Argumentative Essay Examples For Students 
  • 2. How to Write an Argumentative Essay? Examples 
  • 3. Interesting Argumentative Essay Topics 
  • 4. Argumentative Essay Writing Tips 

Free Argumentative Essay Examples For Students 

A good essay presents facts and data to support an argument, evaluates point of view, and proves its point. It's designed to convince the reader with facts and logic.

Below are some more good argumentative essay examples written by our professional essay writers.

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6th Grade Argumentative Essay Examples

Looking for inspiration for your 6th-grade argumentative essay? Explore this detailed example crafted specifically for 6th graders. 

Argumentative Essay Example for 6th Grade

Argumentative Essay Example Grade 7 

With this example, seventh graders can confidently tackle topics they care about.

Argumentative Essay Example for 7th Grade

Grade 8 Argumentative Essay Examples 

Right here, we've got 8th grader example of an argumentative essay.

Grade 8 Argumentative Essay Example

Argumentative Essay Examples For Middle School 

Middle school essays are pretty basic and easier to debate. Following is an example of middle school argumentative essay: 

Argument Essay Example For Middle School

Argumentative Essay Examples For High School PDFs 

Here are some amazing argumentative essay examples for high school students. Read them and get an idea of how you can make your argumentative essay flawless.

Argumentative Essay Example for High School

Evaluation Argumentative Essay Example

Counter Argument Essay Example

Argumentative Essay Examples For College Students 

When it comes to the college level, essay writing becomes more complicated. At this level, students have to write complex papers like research papers or thesis papers .

Here are some argumentative essay examples pdfs that all college students can use as a guide for their next essay assignment:

Argumentative Essay Example For College

Sample Argumentative Essay For College

Sample Argumentative Essay On Smoking

Argumentative Essay On Gun Control

Argumentative Essay Example for O Level

Following argumentative essay samples can assist you in creating an essay if you are an O Level student.

Social Media Argumentative Essay Example

Short Argumentative Essay Examples

There is no precise word count for an argumentative essay. It just has to persuade the reader and give the author's message to the intended audience.

It can be short or lengthy. It would be considered correct as long as there's a discussion in it.

This is a sample of an argumentative essay.

Short Argumentative Essay Example

Ap lang Argumentative Essay Examples

Argumentative Essay Example About Covid-19

5 Paragraph Argumentative Essay Examples 

The traditional argumentative essay outline consists of 5 paragraphs: one introduction, three body paragraphs, and one conclusion.

Here are 5 paragraph argumentative essay examples pdf for crafting an argumentative essay.

5 Paragraph Argumentative Essay

How to Write an Argumentative Essay? Examples 

Writing a compelling argumentative essay can be a daunting task, but with the right guidance and examples, it becomes more manageable.

In this section, we'll explore the essential steps along with examples to master the art of crafting persuasive arguments. 

Argumentative Essay Examples Introduction 

The introduction should include an attention-grabbing hook and background information on the topic. Additionally, it should have a clear thesis statement at the end that outlines the main points of your argument. 

After reading through this introduction, readers should have a good understanding of what they can expect from your paper. 

Here is a thesis statement for argumentative essay example:

Argumentative Essay Examples with Thesis Statement

Need more examples? Don’t worry! Read out these free argumentative essay examples pdf:

Argumentative Essay Examples Introduction

How to start an Argumentative Essay Examples

How to Write a Body Paragraph of Argumentative Essay 

Argumentative essay conclusion example .

The conclusion of your argumentative essay is an important part where everything ties together. It should summarise your main points and reiterate your argument.

Here is an example of what it looks like:

How to End an Argumentative Essay Examples

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Interesting Argumentative Essay Topics 

Choosing an essay topic is sometimes the most difficult part of the writing process. Here are some topics that will help you in brainstorming your topics:

  • Should the government impose a curfew on teens?
  • Should alcohol advertisements be banned?
  • Are cell phones dangerous to our health?
  • Is global warming real or fake?
  • Should school uniforms be mandatory?
  • Does the media influence gender roles in society?
  • Is nuclear energy safe?
  • Should the death penalty be abolished?
  • Should abortion be legal in the United States?
  • Is animal testing necessary?

If you are looking for a comprehensive list of topics, check out our argumentative essay topics blog!

Argumentative Essay Writing Tips 

When it comes to writing high-quality argumentative essays, there are some solid tips you need to know.

Below are 10 useful tips you should keep in mind while crafting an argumentative essay.

  • Choose Engaging Topics

Choosing an engaging topic will make you feel enthusiastic from the moment you start drafting down words in your essay. An argumentative essay topic should always be debatable, arguable, and researchable.

  • Choose the Structure 

An argumentative essay can be structured in three ways: Classical, Toulmin, and Rogerian. Choose any of these types of arguments to give your essay a logical flow and purpose.

  • Conduct Quality Research 

Extensive fact-based research goes a long way in producing a good argumentative essay.  The more you study, the broader your horizons will be, and you will have just that much more supporting evidence.

  • Credible Sources 

You can’t expect someone to agree with opposing views without strong and authentic evidence. If you want someone to change their perspective, you need to persuade them with facts from credible sources .

  • Use Counter Arguments 

One of the most important parts of an argumentative essay is using counter-arguments. Introduce the opposing view in a few short sentences and proceed to refute them with fact-based empirical evidence. This is a powerful way of persuading a reader to agree with your side of the argument.

  • Create a Solid Introduction 

Remember to pay keen attention to the introduction of your essay, as it can make or break your essay. A strong thesis statement lets your readers know your stance and gives them an idea of your philosophy around the topic. 

  • Complex Sentences Never Impress 

Fancy vocabulary and extremely long sentences are too complex to understand. Your goal is to strike the reader’s mind with intelligent arguments and not try to sound smarter than them. Use simple vocabulary, but be fueled with creativity.

  • Clarity and Authority 

When writing an argumentative essay, do not come across as reluctant or uncertain. Whatever you do, don’t play both sides or show your strengths and weaknesses simultaneously. You should choose a side and be confident about the points you make.  

  • Stick to the Essay Length 

When writing an argumentative essay, it is very easy to deviate from the assigned essay length given by your instructor. Writing a 4000-word essay while the maximum essay length given by your instructor was 1500 probably isn’t a good idea.

  • Avoid Sensitive Topics 

Students should avoid hot-button topics like race, sports, politics, and religion at all costs. The last thing you want to do is offend a reader who holds a strong personal opinion of you.

Here is a video with some tips on starting your essay. Be sure to check it out:

In summary, we've explored a wide range of example for different academic levels. These examples will help you in creating strong arguments and using persuasive writing effectively. 

Remember, a good argumentative essay isn't just about stating your opinion. It's about stating it clearly, supporting it with solid evidence, and presenting it convincingly.

Moreover, if you need help with writing argumentative essays, our expert writers are here for you. You can trust our online essay writing service to help you craft engaging argumentative essays.

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You'll no doubt have to write a number of argumentative essays in both high school and college, but what, exactly, is an argumentative essay and how do you write the best one possible? Let's take a look.

A great argumentative essay always combines the same basic elements: approaching an argument from a rational perspective, researching sources, supporting your claims using facts rather than opinion, and articulating your reasoning into the most cogent and reasoned points. Argumentative essays are great building blocks for all sorts of research and rhetoric, so your teachers will expect you to master the technique before long.

But if this sounds daunting, never fear! We'll show how an argumentative essay differs from other kinds of papers, how to research and write them, how to pick an argumentative essay topic, and where to find example essays. So let's get started.

What Is an Argumentative Essay? How Is it Different from Other Kinds of Essays?

There are two basic requirements for any and all essays: to state a claim (a thesis statement) and to support that claim with evidence.

Though every essay is founded on these two ideas, there are several different types of essays, differentiated by the style of the writing, how the writer presents the thesis, and the types of evidence used to support the thesis statement.

Essays can be roughly divided into four different types:

#1: Argumentative #2: Persuasive #3: Expository #4: Analytical

So let's look at each type and what the differences are between them before we focus the rest of our time to argumentative essays.

Argumentative Essay

Argumentative essays are what this article is all about, so let's talk about them first.

An argumentative essay attempts to convince a reader to agree with a particular argument (the writer's thesis statement). The writer takes a firm stand one way or another on a topic and then uses hard evidence to support that stance.

An argumentative essay seeks to prove to the reader that one argument —the writer's argument— is the factually and logically correct one. This means that an argumentative essay must use only evidence-based support to back up a claim , rather than emotional or philosophical reasoning (which is often allowed in other types of essays). Thus, an argumentative essay has a burden of substantiated proof and sources , whereas some other types of essays (namely persuasive essays) do not.

You can write an argumentative essay on any topic, so long as there's room for argument. Generally, you can use the same topics for both a persuasive essay or an argumentative one, so long as you support the argumentative essay with hard evidence.

Example topics of an argumentative essay:

  • "Should farmers be allowed to shoot wolves if those wolves injure or kill farm animals?"
  • "Should the drinking age be lowered in the United States?"
  • "Are alternatives to democracy effective and/or feasible to implement?"

The next three types of essays are not argumentative essays, but you may have written them in school. We're going to cover them so you know what not to do for your argumentative essay.

Persuasive Essay

Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative essays, so it can be easy to get them confused. But knowing what makes an argumentative essay different than a persuasive essay can often mean the difference between an excellent grade and an average one.

Persuasive essays seek to persuade a reader to agree with the point of view of the writer, whether that point of view is based on factual evidence or not. The writer has much more flexibility in the evidence they can use, with the ability to use moral, cultural, or opinion-based reasoning as well as factual reasoning to persuade the reader to agree the writer's side of a given issue.

Instead of being forced to use "pure" reason as one would in an argumentative essay, the writer of a persuasive essay can manipulate or appeal to the reader's emotions. So long as the writer attempts to steer the readers into agreeing with the thesis statement, the writer doesn't necessarily need hard evidence in favor of the argument.

Often, you can use the same topics for both a persuasive essay or an argumentative one—the difference is all in the approach and the evidence you present.

Example topics of a persuasive essay:

  • "Should children be responsible for their parents' debts?"
  • "Should cheating on a test be automatic grounds for expulsion?"
  • "How much should sports leagues be held accountable for player injuries and the long-term consequences of those injuries?"

Expository Essay

An expository essay is typically a short essay in which the writer explains an idea, issue, or theme , or discusses the history of a person, place, or idea.

This is typically a fact-forward essay with little argument or opinion one way or the other.

Example topics of an expository essay:

  • "The History of the Philadelphia Liberty Bell"
  • "The Reasons I Always Wanted to be a Doctor"
  • "The Meaning Behind the Colloquialism ‘People in Glass Houses Shouldn't Throw Stones'"

Analytical Essay

An analytical essay seeks to delve into the deeper meaning of a text or work of art, or unpack a complicated idea . These kinds of essays closely interpret a source and look into its meaning by analyzing it at both a macro and micro level.

This type of analysis can be augmented by historical context or other expert or widely-regarded opinions on the subject, but is mainly supported directly through the original source (the piece or art or text being analyzed) .

Example topics of an analytical essay:

  • "Victory Gin in Place of Water: The Symbolism Behind Gin as the Only Potable Substance in George Orwell's 1984"
  • "Amarna Period Art: The Meaning Behind the Shift from Rigid to Fluid Poses"
  • "Adultery During WWII, as Told Through a Series of Letters to and from Soldiers"

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There are many different types of essay and, over time, you'll be able to master them all.

A Typical Argumentative Essay Assignment

The average argumentative essay is between three to five pages, and will require at least three or four separate sources with which to back your claims . As for the essay topic , you'll most often be asked to write an argumentative essay in an English class on a "general" topic of your choice, ranging the gamut from science, to history, to literature.

But while the topics of an argumentative essay can span several different fields, the structure of an argumentative essay is always the same: you must support a claim—a claim that can reasonably have multiple sides—using multiple sources and using a standard essay format (which we'll talk about later on).

This is why many argumentative essay topics begin with the word "should," as in:

  • "Should all students be required to learn chemistry in high school?"
  • "Should children be required to learn a second language?"
  • "Should schools or governments be allowed to ban books?"

These topics all have at least two sides of the argument: Yes or no. And you must support the side you choose with evidence as to why your side is the correct one.

But there are also plenty of other ways to frame an argumentative essay as well:

  • "Does using social media do more to benefit or harm people?"
  • "Does the legal status of artwork or its creators—graffiti and vandalism, pirated media, a creator who's in jail—have an impact on the art itself?"
  • "Is or should anyone ever be ‘above the law?'"

Though these are worded differently than the first three, you're still essentially forced to pick between two sides of an issue: yes or no, for or against, benefit or detriment. Though your argument might not fall entirely into one side of the divide or another—for instance, you could claim that social media has positively impacted some aspects of modern life while being a detriment to others—your essay should still support one side of the argument above all. Your final stance would be that overall , social media is beneficial or overall , social media is harmful.

If your argument is one that is mostly text-based or backed by a single source (e.g., "How does Salinger show that Holden Caulfield is an unreliable narrator?" or "Does Gatsby personify the American Dream?"), then it's an analytical essay, rather than an argumentative essay. An argumentative essay will always be focused on more general topics so that you can use multiple sources to back up your claims.

Good Argumentative Essay Topics

So you know the basic idea behind an argumentative essay, but what topic should you write about?

Again, almost always, you'll be asked to write an argumentative essay on a free topic of your choice, or you'll be asked to select between a few given topics . If you're given complete free reign of topics, then it'll be up to you to find an essay topic that no only appeals to you, but that you can turn into an A+ argumentative essay.

What makes a "good" argumentative essay topic depends on both the subject matter and your personal interest —it can be hard to give your best effort on something that bores you to tears! But it can also be near impossible to write an argumentative essay on a topic that has no room for debate.

As we said earlier, a good argumentative essay topic will be one that has the potential to reasonably go in at least two directions—for or against, yes or no, and why . For example, it's pretty hard to write an argumentative essay on whether or not people should be allowed to murder one another—not a whole lot of debate there for most people!—but writing an essay for or against the death penalty has a lot more wiggle room for evidence and argument.

A good topic is also one that can be substantiated through hard evidence and relevant sources . So be sure to pick a topic that other people have studied (or at least studied elements of) so that you can use their data in your argument. For example, if you're arguing that it should be mandatory for all middle school children to play a sport, you might have to apply smaller scientific data points to the larger picture you're trying to justify. There are probably several studies you could cite on the benefits of physical activity and the positive effect structure and teamwork has on young minds, but there's probably no study you could use where a group of scientists put all middle-schoolers in one jurisdiction into a mandatory sports program (since that's probably never happened). So long as your evidence is relevant to your point and you can extrapolate from it to form a larger whole, you can use it as a part of your resource material.

And if you need ideas on where to get started, or just want to see sample argumentative essay topics, then check out these links for hundreds of potential argumentative essay topics.

101 Persuasive (or Argumentative) Essay and Speech Topics

301 Prompts for Argumentative Writing

Top 50 Ideas for Argumentative/Persuasive Essay Writing

[Note: some of these say "persuasive essay topics," but just remember that the same topic can often be used for both a persuasive essay and an argumentative essay; the difference is in your writing style and the evidence you use to support your claims.]

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KO! Find that one argumentative essay topic you can absolutely conquer.

Argumentative Essay Format

Argumentative Essays are composed of four main elements:

  • A position (your argument)
  • Your reasons
  • Supporting evidence for those reasons (from reliable sources)
  • Counterargument(s) (possible opposing arguments and reasons why those arguments are incorrect)

If you're familiar with essay writing in general, then you're also probably familiar with the five paragraph essay structure . This structure is a simple tool to show how one outlines an essay and breaks it down into its component parts, although it can be expanded into as many paragraphs as you want beyond the core five.

The standard argumentative essay is often 3-5 pages, which will usually mean a lot more than five paragraphs, but your overall structure will look the same as a much shorter essay.

An argumentative essay at its simplest structure will look like:

Paragraph 1: Intro

  • Set up the story/problem/issue
  • Thesis/claim

Paragraph 2: Support

  • Reason #1 claim is correct
  • Supporting evidence with sources

Paragraph 3: Support

  • Reason #2 claim is correct

Paragraph 4: Counterargument

  • Explanation of argument for the other side
  • Refutation of opposing argument with supporting evidence

Paragraph 5: Conclusion

  • Re-state claim
  • Sum up reasons and support of claim from the essay to prove claim is correct

Now let's unpack each of these paragraph types to see how they work (with examples!), what goes into them, and why.

Paragraph 1—Set Up and Claim

Your first task is to introduce the reader to the topic at hand so they'll be prepared for your claim. Give a little background information, set the scene, and give the reader some stakes so that they care about the issue you're going to discuss.

Next, you absolutely must have a position on an argument and make that position clear to the readers. It's not an argumentative essay unless you're arguing for a specific claim, and this claim will be your thesis statement.

Your thesis CANNOT be a mere statement of fact (e.g., "Washington DC is the capital of the United States"). Your thesis must instead be an opinion which can be backed up with evidence and has the potential to be argued against (e.g., "New York should be the capital of the United States").

Paragraphs 2 and 3—Your Evidence

These are your body paragraphs in which you give the reasons why your argument is the best one and back up this reasoning with concrete evidence .

The argument supporting the thesis of an argumentative essay should be one that can be supported by facts and evidence, rather than personal opinion or cultural or religious mores.

For example, if you're arguing that New York should be the new capital of the US, you would have to back up that fact by discussing the factual contrasts between New York and DC in terms of location, population, revenue, and laws. You would then have to talk about the precedents for what makes for a good capital city and why New York fits the bill more than DC does.

Your argument can't simply be that a lot of people think New York is the best city ever and that you agree.

In addition to using concrete evidence, you always want to keep the tone of your essay passionate, but impersonal . Even though you're writing your argument from a single opinion, don't use first person language—"I think," "I feel," "I believe,"—to present your claims. Doing so is repetitive, since by writing the essay you're already telling the audience what you feel, and using first person language weakens your writing voice.

For example,

"I think that Washington DC is no longer suited to be the capital city of the United States."

"Washington DC is no longer suited to be the capital city of the United States."

The second statement sounds far stronger and more analytical.

Paragraph 4—Argument for the Other Side and Refutation

Even without a counter argument, you can make a pretty persuasive claim, but a counterargument will round out your essay into one that is much more persuasive and substantial.

By anticipating an argument against your claim and taking the initiative to counter it, you're allowing yourself to get ahead of the game. This way, you show that you've given great thought to all sides of the issue before choosing your position, and you demonstrate in multiple ways how yours is the more reasoned and supported side.

Paragraph 5—Conclusion

This paragraph is where you re-state your argument and summarize why it's the best claim.

Briefly touch on your supporting evidence and voila! A finished argumentative essay.

body_plesiosaur

Your essay should have just as awesome a skeleton as this plesiosaur does. (In other words: a ridiculously awesome skeleton)

Argumentative Essay Example: 5-Paragraph Style

It always helps to have an example to learn from. I've written a full 5-paragraph argumentative essay here. Look at how I state my thesis in paragraph 1, give supporting evidence in paragraphs 2 and 3, address a counterargument in paragraph 4, and conclude in paragraph 5.

Topic: Is it possible to maintain conflicting loyalties?

Paragraph 1

It is almost impossible to go through life without encountering a situation where your loyalties to different people or causes come into conflict with each other. Maybe you have a loving relationship with your sister, but she disagrees with your decision to join the army, or you find yourself torn between your cultural beliefs and your scientific ones. These conflicting loyalties can often be maintained for a time, but as examples from both history and psychological theory illustrate, sooner or later, people have to make a choice between competing loyalties, as no one can maintain a conflicting loyalty or belief system forever.

The first two sentences set the scene and give some hypothetical examples and stakes for the reader to care about.

The third sentence finishes off the intro with the thesis statement, making very clear how the author stands on the issue ("people have to make a choice between competing loyalties, as no one can maintain a conflicting loyalty or belief system forever." )

Paragraphs 2 and 3

Psychological theory states that human beings are not equipped to maintain conflicting loyalties indefinitely and that attempting to do so leads to a state called "cognitive dissonance." Cognitive dissonance theory is the psychological idea that people undergo tremendous mental stress or anxiety when holding contradictory beliefs, values, or loyalties (Festinger, 1957). Even if human beings initially hold a conflicting loyalty, they will do their best to find a mental equilibrium by making a choice between those loyalties—stay stalwart to a belief system or change their beliefs. One of the earliest formal examples of cognitive dissonance theory comes from Leon Festinger's When Prophesy Fails . Members of an apocalyptic cult are told that the end of the world will occur on a specific date and that they alone will be spared the Earth's destruction. When that day comes and goes with no apocalypse, the cult members face a cognitive dissonance between what they see and what they've been led to believe (Festinger, 1956). Some choose to believe that the cult's beliefs are still correct, but that the Earth was simply spared from destruction by mercy, while others choose to believe that they were lied to and that the cult was fraudulent all along. Both beliefs cannot be correct at the same time, and so the cult members are forced to make their choice.

But even when conflicting loyalties can lead to potentially physical, rather than just mental, consequences, people will always make a choice to fall on one side or other of a dividing line. Take, for instance, Nicolaus Copernicus, a man born and raised in Catholic Poland (and educated in Catholic Italy). Though the Catholic church dictated specific scientific teachings, Copernicus' loyalty to his own observations and scientific evidence won out over his loyalty to his country's government and belief system. When he published his heliocentric model of the solar system--in opposition to the geocentric model that had been widely accepted for hundreds of years (Hannam, 2011)-- Copernicus was making a choice between his loyalties. In an attempt t o maintain his fealty both to the established system and to what he believed, h e sat on his findings for a number of years (Fantoli, 1994). But, ultimately, Copernicus made the choice to side with his beliefs and observations above all and published his work for the world to see (even though, in doing so, he risked both his reputation and personal freedoms).

These two paragraphs provide the reasons why the author supports the main argument and uses substantiated sources to back those reasons.

The paragraph on cognitive dissonance theory gives both broad supporting evidence and more narrow, detailed supporting evidence to show why the thesis statement is correct not just anecdotally but also scientifically and psychologically. First, we see why people in general have a difficult time accepting conflicting loyalties and desires and then how this applies to individuals through the example of the cult members from the Dr. Festinger's research.

The next paragraph continues to use more detailed examples from history to provide further evidence of why the thesis that people cannot indefinitely maintain conflicting loyalties is true.

Paragraph 4

Some will claim that it is possible to maintain conflicting beliefs or loyalties permanently, but this is often more a matter of people deluding themselves and still making a choice for one side or the other, rather than truly maintaining loyalty to both sides equally. For example, Lancelot du Lac typifies a person who claims to maintain a balanced loyalty between to two parties, but his attempt to do so fails (as all attempts to permanently maintain conflicting loyalties must). Lancelot tells himself and others that he is equally devoted to both King Arthur and his court and to being Queen Guinevere's knight (Malory, 2008). But he can neither be in two places at once to protect both the king and queen, nor can he help but let his romantic feelings for the queen to interfere with his duties to the king and the kingdom. Ultimately, he and Queen Guinevere give into their feelings for one another and Lancelot—though he denies it—chooses his loyalty to her over his loyalty to Arthur. This decision plunges the kingdom into a civil war, ages Lancelot prematurely, and ultimately leads to Camelot's ruin (Raabe, 1987). Though Lancelot claimed to have been loyal to both the king and the queen, this loyalty was ultimately in conflict, and he could not maintain it.

Here we have the acknowledgement of a potential counter-argument and the evidence as to why it isn't true.

The argument is that some people (or literary characters) have asserted that they give equal weight to their conflicting loyalties. The refutation is that, though some may claim to be able to maintain conflicting loyalties, they're either lying to others or deceiving themselves. The paragraph shows why this is true by providing an example of this in action.

Paragraph 5

Whether it be through literature or history, time and time again, people demonstrate the challenges of trying to manage conflicting loyalties and the inevitable consequences of doing so. Though belief systems are malleable and will often change over time, it is not possible to maintain two mutually exclusive loyalties or beliefs at once. In the end, people always make a choice, and loyalty for one party or one side of an issue will always trump loyalty to the other.

The concluding paragraph summarizes the essay, touches on the evidence presented, and re-states the thesis statement.

How to Write an Argumentative Essay: 8 Steps

Writing the best argumentative essay is all about the preparation, so let's talk steps:

#1: Preliminary Research

If you have the option to pick your own argumentative essay topic (which you most likely will), then choose one or two topics you find the most intriguing or that you have a vested interest in and do some preliminary research on both sides of the debate.

Do an open internet search just to see what the general chatter is on the topic and what the research trends are.

Did your preliminary reading influence you to pick a side or change your side? Without diving into all the scholarly articles at length, do you believe there's enough evidence to support your claim? Have there been scientific studies? Experiments? Does a noted scholar in the field agree with you? If not, you may need to pick another topic or side of the argument to support.

#2: Pick Your Side and Form Your Thesis

Now's the time to pick the side of the argument you feel you can support the best and summarize your main point into your thesis statement.

Your thesis will be the basis of your entire essay, so make sure you know which side you're on, that you've stated it clearly, and that you stick by your argument throughout the entire essay .

#3: Heavy-Duty Research Time

You've taken a gander at what the internet at large has to say on your argument, but now's the time to actually read those sources and take notes.

Check scholarly journals online at Google Scholar , the Directory of Open Access Journals , or JStor . You can also search individual university or school libraries and websites to see what kinds of academic articles you can access for free. Keep track of your important quotes and page numbers and put them somewhere that's easy to find later.

And don't forget to check your school or local libraries as well!

#4: Outline

Follow the five-paragraph outline structure from the previous section.

Fill in your topic, your reasons, and your supporting evidence into each of the categories.

Before you begin to flesh out the essay, take a look at what you've got. Is your thesis statement in the first paragraph? Is it clear? Is your argument logical? Does your supporting evidence support your reasoning?

By outlining your essay, you streamline your process and take care of any logic gaps before you dive headfirst into the writing. This will save you a lot of grief later on if you need to change your sources or your structure, so don't get too trigger-happy and skip this step.

Now that you've laid out exactly what you'll need for your essay and where, it's time to fill in all the gaps by writing it out.

Take it one step at a time and expand your ideas into complete sentences and substantiated claims. It may feel daunting to turn an outline into a complete draft, but just remember that you've already laid out all the groundwork; now you're just filling in the gaps.

If you have the time before deadline, give yourself a day or two (or even just an hour!) away from your essay . Looking it over with fresh eyes will allow you to see errors, both minor and major, that you likely would have missed had you tried to edit when it was still raw.

Take a first pass over the entire essay and try your best to ignore any minor spelling or grammar mistakes—you're just looking at the big picture right now. Does it make sense as a whole? Did the essay succeed in making an argument and backing that argument up logically? (Do you feel persuaded?)

If not, go back and make notes so that you can fix it for your final draft.

Once you've made your revisions to the overall structure, mark all your small errors and grammar problems so you can fix them in the next draft.

#7: Final Draft

Use the notes you made on the rough draft and go in and hack and smooth away until you're satisfied with the final result.

A checklist for your final draft:

  • Formatting is correct according to your teacher's standards
  • No errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation
  • Essay is the right length and size for the assignment
  • The argument is present, consistent, and concise
  • Each reason is supported by relevant evidence
  • The essay makes sense overall

#8: Celebrate!

Once you've brought that final draft to a perfect polish and turned in your assignment, you're done! Go you!

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Be prepared and ♪ you'll never go hungry again ♪, *cough*, or struggle with your argumentative essay-writing again. (Walt Disney Studios)

Good Examples of Argumentative Essays Online

Theory is all well and good, but examples are key. Just to get you started on what a fully-fleshed out argumentative essay looks like, let's see some examples in action.

Check out these two argumentative essay examples on the use of landmines and freons (and note the excellent use of concrete sources to back up their arguments!).

The Use of Landmines

A Shattered Sky

The Take-Aways: Keys to Writing an Argumentative Essay

At first, writing an argumentative essay may seem like a monstrous hurdle to overcome, but with the proper preparation and understanding, you'll be able to knock yours out of the park.

Remember the differences between a persuasive essay and an argumentative one, make sure your thesis is clear, and double-check that your supporting evidence is both relevant to your point and well-sourced . Pick your topic, do your research, make your outline, and fill in the gaps. Before you know it, you'll have yourself an A+ argumentative essay there, my friend.

What's Next?

Now you know the ins and outs of an argumentative essay, but how comfortable are you writing in other styles? Learn more about the four writing styles and when it makes sense to use each .

Understand how to make an argument, but still having trouble organizing your thoughts? Check out our guide to three popular essay formats and choose which one is right for you.

Ready to make your case, but not sure what to write about? We've created a list of 50 potential argumentative essay topics to spark your imagination.

Courtney scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT in high school and went on to graduate from Stanford University with a degree in Cultural and Social Anthropology. She is passionate about bringing education and the tools to succeed to students from all backgrounds and walks of life, as she believes open education is one of the great societal equalizers. She has years of tutoring experience and writes creative works in her free time.

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Argumentative Essay Examples

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Are you looking for argumentative essay examples? Good news – our professional essay writers have compiled several useful samples that can be used for your reference. Sometimes, you would read tons of material on the writing process, but still have no idea where to start from. That’s exactly that moment when you need some good essay examples.  Why is having an excellent sample in front of your eyes so important? Above all, it’s much easier to learn how to write the work from a clearly structured essay example. Besides, you may find tons of inspirational ideas in ready-made samples. So get ready to become inspired by useful insights that we have to offer.

What Is an Argument?

In everyday life, an argument means some misunderstanding between people. But in an academic context, an argument is a list of statements that support or disapprove some point of view.  Typically, you will use your claims to convince people that your viewpoint is true. How to write an argumentative essay ? To write a good argumentative essay, you will need to establish a strong position on the topic and present compelling evidence that backs up your point.  There are two purposes you should keep in mind when building an argument . Your primary goal is to:

  • Change people’s views.
  • Persuade doing something.

There exist 3 main approaches to developing an argument: 

  • Classical It’s a type of argument that the writer or speaker uses to convince the audience to accept their point of view. The main task is to apply effective strategies to persuade someone to take your side. Ethos, pathos and logos are used to convince the audience. It consists of 5 elements: introduction, confirmation, narration, refutation, and conclusion.
  • Toulmin This method is applied when there is no evident solution to the issue discussed. The Toulmin model is used if you are dealing with some complex situation. You will need to break your argumentation into 6 elements: claim, grounds, warrant, backing, qualifier and rebuttal.
  • Rogerian It’s a series of statements that focus on making the audience meet the speaker/ writer halfway. In most cases, an addressee won’t accept your point fully. That’s exactly when you can establish middle ground.

Examples of Argumentative Essays

Getting familiar with an argumentative essay example is a brilliant way to cope with your writing assignment. After studying some successful essays, it will be much easier to start your own work. We offer you to look through several argumentative essay samples attached below. They are divided into categories by an academic level for easier navigation. Feel free to use these samples from our college essay service for your reference and inspiration.

Argumentative Essay Example for Middle School

If you are a middle-school student, you might be interested in an argumentative essay sample for middle school. Check out an example attached below and see how the arguments are built.

Unlike other academic levels, the writing requirements for middle school are not strict. Here’s a rubric you can use to check whether your writing corresponds with the standard recommendations. 

Argumentative Essay Sample for High School

Below you can find an argumentative essay example for high school. This essay is written by a persuasive essay writer based on the literary work. Pay attention to how arguments are built and what evidence is used to prove the main position.

Essays written in high schools require stronger professional skills, more detailed structure and a very thoughtful manner of writing. Works have serious topics which need full involvement in your study. Here’re several criteria you shouldn’t skip. 

Some of the successful topics for high-school argumentative writing include:

  • Should religion have place in government?
  • Should marijuana be legalized?
  • What can be done about gun control in the US?
  • Is single-sex education harmful or beneficial to students?

Choose the one you like and use the sample to craft a great writing piece. 

Argumentative Essay Example for College

If you are a college student, here’s an argumentative essay example for college. This essay begins with counter arguments. Then, the writer refutes the opposite position by providing compelling support of the other side.

Essay for college requires much effort and time. You will need to show strong persuasive skills, great focus, and incredible willingness to succeed. Your work should have 4 elements just like any other type of essay:

  • Introductory paragraph.
  • Thesis statement.
  • Body paragraphs.
  • Conclusion for essay .

Your essay can be longer than 5 paragraphs – it depends on the number of claims and counter arguments you want to include. Also, make sure you check this rubric and include all points in your writing.

Short Argumentative Essay Example

Sometimes, you will be asked to write a brief work. In this case, you may be interested in an example of a short argumentative essay. Look through the sample attached below. This will help you get a clear idea on the writing process. 

This type of work requires 3 steps one should follow:

  • Turning the topic into a question and, then, answering it.
  • Stating an argument and proving it with evidence.
  • Outlining (briefly) your main points.

Looking for an argumentative essay outline example ? We have a special blog with a lot of different samples for such kind of an outline.

Final Thoughts

Now that you have looked through some examples of an argumentative essay , it’s time to compose your own work. Remember to develop a strong thesis statement and jam-pack your writing with supporting examples. And the last tip from StudyCrumb: don’t be afraid to provide some room for the opposite side. Include several counterarguments and explain why they are weak. This will make your position sound stronger. 

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FAQ about Argumentative Essay Examples

1. how to give examples in an argumentative essay.

A good argumentative essay should be supported by descent examples. You should use credible sources to find supporting evidence: scholarly articles, scientific works, official websites. Use citations and quotations to refer to your sources. It would be great if you could integrate some statistical numbers in your writing.

2. What is the example of an argumentative essay?

An argumentative essay should focus on the debatable issue. There should be two sides of the coin – you should take one side and prove your point. Some good examples for argumentative writing are: 

Is capital punishment effective? 

Does religion cause war?

Does social media make people more lonely?

4. How do I conclude an argumentative essay?

Conclusion of one argumentative essay might be the beginning of another one. To conclude your writing, briefly summarize your key points. Do not introduce any new information in your last paragraph. Emphasize the importance of your viewpoint and finish with some food for thought.

3. Can you start an argumentative essay with a question?

Argumentative essay might start with a rhetorical question or statement. This technique is called a hook. It allows to catch the reader’s attention from the first lines. Then, an author should provide some context related to the topic and create a strong thesis statement.

Argumentative Essay Writing

Argumentative Essay Examples

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Best Argumentative Essay Examples for Your Help

Published on: Mar 10, 2023

Last updated on: Jan 30, 2024

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Argumentative essays are one of the most common types of essay writing. Students are assigned to write such essays very frequently.

Despite being assigned so frequently, students still find it hard to write a good argumentative essay .

There are certain things that one needs to follow to write a good argumentative essay. The first thing is to choose an effective and interesting topic. Use all possible sources to dig out the best topic.

Afterward, the student should choose the model that they would follow to write this type of essay. Follow the steps of the chosen model and start writing the essay.

The models for writing an argumentative essay are the classical model, the Rogerian model, and the Toulmin model.

To make sure that you write a good argumentative essay, read the different types of examples mentioned in this blog.

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Good Argumentative Essay Examples

Argumentative essays are an inevitable part of academic life. To write a good argumentative essay, you need to see a few good examples of this type of essay.

To analyze whether the example is good to take help from or not. You need to look for a few things in it.

Make sure it follows one specific model and has an introductory paragraph, organized body paragraphs, and a formal conclusion.

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How to Start an Argumentative Essay Example

Learning how to start an argumentative essay example is a tricky thing for beginners. It is quite simple but can be challenging for newbies.   To start an argumentative essay example, you need to write a brief and attractive introduction. It is written to convince the reader and make them understand your point of view .

Add body paragraphs after the introduction to support your thesis statement. Also, use body paragraphs to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of your side of the argument.

Write a formal conclusion for your essay and summarize all the key elements of your essay. Look at the example mentioned below to understand the concept more clearly.

Check out this video for more information!

Argumentative Essay Example (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Example 

Argumentative essays are assigned to university students more often than the students of schools and colleges.

 It involves arguments over vast and sometimes bold topics as well.

For university students, usually, argumentative essay topics are not provided. They are required to search for the topic themselves and write accordingly.

The following examples will give an idea of how university students write argumentative essays.

Argumentative Essay Example for University (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for College

For the college level, it is recommended to use simple language and avoid the use of complex words in essays.

Make sure that using simple language and valid evidence, you support your claim well and make it as convincing as possible

If you are a college student and want to write an argumentative essay, read the examples provided below. Focus on the formatting and the vocabulary used.

Argumentative Essay Example for College (PDF)

College Argumentative Essay Sample (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for Middle School

Being a middle school student, you must be wondering how we write an argumentative essay. And how can you support your argument?

Go through the following examples and hopefully, you will be able to write an effective argumentative essay very easily.

Argumentative Essay Example for Middle School(PDF)

Middle School Argumentative Essay Sample (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for High School

High school students are not very aware of all the skills that are needed to write research papers and essays. 

Especially, when it comes to argumentative essays, it becomes quite a challenge for high schools to defend their argument

In this scenario, the best option is to look into some good examples. Here we have summed up two best examples of argumentative essays for high school students specifically.

Argumentative Essay Example for High School (PDF)

High School Argumentative Essay Sample (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for O Level

The course outline for O levels is quite tough. O levels students need to have a good command of the English language and amazing writing skills.

If you are an O-level student, the following examples will guide you on how to write an argumentative essay.

Argumentative Essay Example for O Level (PDF)

Argumentative Essay for O Level Students (PDF)

5-Paragraph Argumentative Essay Examples

A 5-paragraph essay is basically a formatting style for essay writing. It has the following five parts:

  • Introduction

In the introduction, the writer introduces the topic and provides a glance at the collected data to support the main argument.

  • Body paragraph 1

The first body paragraph discusses the first and most important point related to the argument. It starts with a topic sentence and has all the factual data to make the argument convincing.

  • Body paragraph 2

The second body paragraph mentions the second most important element of the argument. A topic sentence is used to start these paragraphs. It gives the idea of the point that will discuss in the following paragraph.

  • Body paragraph 3

The third paragraph discusses all the miscellaneous points. Also, it uses a transitional sentence at the end to show a relation to the conclusion.

The conclusion of a five-paragraph essay reiterates all the major elements of an argumentative essay. It also restates the thesis statement using a more convincing choice of words.

Look at the example below to see how a well-written five-paragraph essay looks like

5 Paragraph Argumentative Essay Example (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for 6th Grade

Students in 6th grade are at a point where they are learning new things every day. 

Writing an argumentative essay is an interesting activity for them as they like to convince people of their point of view.

Argumentative essays written at such levels are very simple but well convincing. 

The following example will give you more detail on how a 6th-grade student should write an argumentative essay.

6th Grade Argumentative Essay Example (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Examples for 7th Grade

There is not much difference between a 6th-grade and a 7th-grade student. Both of them are enhancing their writing and academic skills.

Here is another example to help you with writing an effective argumentative essay.

7th Grade Argumentative Essay Example (PDF)

Tough Essay Due? Hire a Writer!

Tough Essay Due? Hire a Writer!

Short Argumentative Essay Examples

For an argumentative essay, there is no specific limit for the word count. It only has to convince the readers and pass on the knowledge of the writer to the intended audience.

It can be short or detailed. It would be considered valid as far as it has an argument involved in it.

Following is an example of a short argumentative essay example

Short Argumentative Essay Example (PDF)

Immigration Argumentative Essay Examples

Immigration is a hot topic for a very long time now. People have different opinions regarding this issue.

Where there is more than one opinion, an argumentative essay can be written on that topic. The following are examples of argumentative essays on immigration.

Read them and try to understand how an effective argumentative essay is written on such a topic.

Argumentative Essay Example on Immigration (PDF)

Argumentative Essay Sample on Immigration (PDF)

Writing essays is usually a tiring and time-consuming assignment to do. Students already have a bunch of assignments for other subjects to complete. In this situation, asking for help from professional writers is the best choice.

If you are still in need of assistance, our essay writer AI can help you create a compelling essay that presents your argument clearly and effectively. 

With our argumentative essay writing service, you will enjoy perks like expert guidance, unlimited revisions, and helpful customer support. Let our essay writer help you make an impact with your essay on global warming today! 

Place your order with our college essay writing service today!

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the 7 types of arguments.

The seven types of arguments are as follows:

  • Statistical

What is the structure of an argument?

The structure of an argument consists of a main point (thesis statement) that is supported by evidence. 

This evidence can include facts, statistics, examples, and other forms of data that help to prove or disprove the thesis statement. 

After providing the evidence, arguments also often include a conclusion that summarizes the main points made throughout the argument.

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argument essay for middle school

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How One Tech Skeptic Decided A.I. Might Benefit the Middle Class

David Autor, an M.I.T. economist and tech contrarian, argues that A.I. is fundamentally different from past waves of computerization.

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David Autor, wearing a dark blazer and blue shirt, stands against a wood-paneled wall. A large window is nearby.

By Steve Lohr

David Autor seems an unlikely A.I. optimist. The labor economist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is best known for his in-depth studies showing how much technology and trade have eroded the incomes of millions of American workers over the years.

But Mr. Autor is now making the case that the new wave of technology — generative artificial intelligence, which can produce hyper-realistic images and video and convincingly imitate humans’ voices and writing — could reverse that trend.

“A.I., if used well, can assist with restoring the middle-skill, middle-class heart of the U.S. labor market that has been hollowed out by automation and globalization,” Mr. Autor wrote in a paper that Noema Magazine published in February.

Mr. Autor’s stance on A.I. looks like a stunning conversion for a longtime expert on technology’s work force casualties. But he said the facts had changed and so had his thinking.

Modern A.I., Mr. Autor said, is a fundamentally different technology, opening the door to new possibilities. It can, he continued, change the economics of high-stakes decision-making so more people can take on some of the work that is now the province of elite, and expensive, experts like doctors, lawyers, software engineers and college professors. And if more people, including those without college degrees, can do more valuable work, they should be paid more, lifting more workers into the middle class.

The researcher, whom The Economist once called “the academic voice of the American worker,” started his career as a software developer and a leader of a computer-education nonprofit before switching to economics — and spending decades examining the impact of technology and globalization on workers and wages.

Mr. Autor, 59, was an author of an influential study in 2003 that concluded that 60 percent of the shift in demand favoring college-educated workers over the previous three decades was attributable to computerization. Later research examined the role of technology in wage polarization and in skewing employment growth toward low-wage service jobs .

Other economists view Mr. Autor’s latest treatise as a stimulating, though speculative, thought exercise.

“I’m a great admirer of David Autor’s work, but his hypothesis is only one possible scenario,” said Laura Tyson, a professor at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, who was chair of the Council of Economic Advisers during the Clinton administration. “There is broad agreement that A.I. will produce a productivity benefit, but how that translates into wages and employment is very uncertain.”

That uncertainty usually veers toward pessimism. Not just Silicon Valley doomsayers, but mainstream economists predict that many jobs, from call center workers to software developers, are at risk. In a report last year , Goldman Sachs concluded that generative A.I. could automate activities equivalent to 300 million full-time jobs globally.

In Mr. Autor’s latest report, which was also published in the National Bureau of Economic Research, he discounts the likelihood that A.I. can replace human judgment entirely. And he sees the demand for health care, software, education and legal advice as almost limitless, so that lowering costs should expand those fields as their products and services become more widely affordable.

It’s “not a forecast but an argument” for an alternative path ahead, very different from the jobs apocalypse foreseen by Elon Musk, among others, he said.

Until now, Mr. Autor said, computers were programmed to follow rules. They relentlessly got better, faster and cheaper. And routine tasks, in an office or a factory, could be reduced to a series of step-by-step rules that have increasingly been automated. Those jobs were typically done by middle-skill workers without four-year college degrees.

A.I., by contrast, is trained on vast troves of data — virtually all the text, images and software code on the internet. When prompted, powerful A.I. chatbots like Open AI’s ChatGPT and Google’s Gemini can generate reports and computer programs or answer questions.

“It doesn’t know rules,” Mr. Autor said. “It learns by absorbing lots and lots of examples. It’s completely different from what we had in computing.”

An A.I. helper, he said, equipped with a storehouse of learned examples can offer “guidance” (in health care, did you consider this diagnosis?) and “guardrails” (don’t prescribe these two drugs together).

In that way, Mr. Autor said, A.I. becomes not a job killer but a “worker complementary technology,” which enables someone without as much expertise to do more valuable work.

Early studies of generative A.I. in the workplace point to the potential. One research project by two M.I.T. graduate students , whom Mr. Autor advised, assigned tasks like writing short reports or news releases to office professionals. A.I. increased the productivity of all workers, but the less skilled and experienced benefited the most. Later research with call center workers and computer programmers found a similar pattern.

But even if A.I. delivers the largest productivity gains to less-experienced workers, that does not mean they will reap the rewards of higher pay and better career paths. That will also depend on corporate behavior, worker bargaining power and policy incentives.

Daron Acemoglu, an M.I.T. economist and occasional collaborator of Mr. Autor’s, said his colleague’s vision is one possible path ahead, but not necessarily the most likely one. History, Mr. Acemoglu said, is not with the lift-all-boats optimists.

“We’ve been here before with other digital technologies, and it hasn’t happened,” he said.

Mr. Autor acknowledges the challenges. “But I do think there is value in imagining a positive outcome, encouraging debate and preparing for a better future,” he said. “This technology is a tool, and how we decide to use it is up to us.”

Steve Lohr writes about technology and its impact on the economy, jobs and the workplace. More about Steve Lohr

Explore Our Coverage of Artificial Intelligence

News  and Analysis

OpenAI unveiled Voice Engine , an A.I. technology that can recreate a person’s voice from a 15-second recording.

Amazon said it had added $2.75 billion to its investment in Anthropic , an A.I. start-up that competes with companies like OpenAI and Google.

Gov. Bill Lee of Tennessee signed a bill  to prevent the use of A.I. to copy a performer’s voice. It is the first such measure in the United States.

French regulators said Google failed to notify news publishers  that it was using their articles to train its A.I. algorithms, part of a wider ruling against the company for its negotiating practices with media outlets.

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  1. 33 Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School

    Good Argumentative Essay Topic Ideas (and Free, too!) With these 33 new argumentative essay topics for middle school students, you can help your students learn more about what makes a good argument and how to evaluate and decipher so-called "evidence.". As they explore topics like the ways in which schools handle bullying and whether or not ...

  2. 94 Excellent Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School

    This list of excellent argumentative essay topics for middle school is sure to give your students the practice they need in getting their arguments down on paper, in a persuasive way. With a variety of topics ranging from whether or not to outlaw animal testing to debating a 3-day weekend, this curated collection will give your kiddos lots of ...

  3. 50 Mindblowing Argumentive Essay Topics for Middle School

    Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle Schoolers. Topics that enhance the thinking capacity of your students are going to be the best ones. Topics that are relatable and knowledgeable enough to make your students think more and from more than one perspective. ... Talking about middle school, the stage is more formative, and it requires learning ...

  4. How to Teach Argument Writing Step-By-Step

    I teach students how to write a step-by-step 5 paragraph argumentative essay consisting of the following: Introduction: Includes a lead/hook, background information about the topic, and a thesis statement that includes the claim. Body Paragraph #1: Introduces the first reason that the claim is valid. Supports that reason with facts, examples ...

  5. 100 Compelling Argumentative Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

    100 Thought-Provoking Argumentative Writing Prompts for Kids and Teens. Practice making well-reasoned arguments using research and facts. Writing a strong argumentative essay teaches students to make a case for their own point of view without relying on emotion or passion. These argumentative essay topics provide options for kids of all ages ...

  6. 61 Great Argumentative Writing Prompts for Middle School

    argumentative writing prompts for middle school. 26. Discuss ways that teachers can make lessons more accessible to students. 27. State your opinion on whether middle schoolers watch too much television. 28. Describe why it's important not to always judge someone based on how they look. 29. Share the importance of learning study skills.

  7. 20 Argumentative Essay Topics for Students

    What is an argument essay? An argument essay uses logic and reasoning to defend a position or point of view. In an argument essay, research, evidence, and examples are used to convince the reader to consider a different point of view. A strong argument essay also acknowledges the opposing viewpoint. This is known as the counterargument.

  8. 20+ Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School to Get Started

    May 31, 2023. An argumentative essay for middle school focuses on issues surrounding students in primary and secondary schools. And given that there are numerous topics to cover within this scope, it's important to focus on an area you can fully explore. To be clear, choosing the best topic to argue is the first step to writing an ...

  9. 45 Argumentative Writing Prompts for Middle School

    Use these prompts for students who finish work early and need something to do. To choose a prompt, have students pick a number between 1 and 45. Challenge your students to use one writing prompt every day for a full week. Pick prompts that line up with what students are learning in other classes (like history or art).

  10. The Top 34 Argumentative Essay Topics For Middle School

    The argumentative essay lessons begin in middle school, when the young minds are ready to start defending ideas with logic and reason. Even though the classes talk about serious educational content, middle school students still love to have fun. For argumentative essays to be taken seriously, the topics need to be geared toward those young minds.

  11. Teaching Argumentative Writing in Middle School ELA: Part One

    My done-for-you Argumentative Writing Unit scaffolds how to write an argumentative essay for you and your students. The unit includes 23 full lesson plans, slide presentations, notebook pages for students, teacher keys and examples, student references pages, and more for a well-rounded unit. Plus, this unit goes through the exact process I ...

  12. A Plethora Of Writing Examples For Middle School (& High School)

    Reflective essay examples from Lake Washington Girls Middle School If you know of any other online writing example sources, please feel free to share them in the comments below. Related topics: Argumentative Writing , Informative Writing , Mentor Texts , Narrative Writing

  13. 10 (of 33) Argumentative Essay Topics for Middle School

    Use these argumentative essay topics to teach your middle-schoolers all about the process of delivering well-researched, evidence-based arguments to their pe...

  14. Making evaluating arguments fun for middle schoolers

    The kids underlined and annotated multiple written arguments, identifying important elements like the author's claim, thesis, reasons and evidence. Eventually, my students will begin crafting ...

  15. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    Do your students write Argumentative Essays that do not use supporting evidence? Are you looking for a thorough way to incorporate both standards based and ...

  16. Short Argumentative Essay Samples for Middle School

    Argumentative essays serve as a powerful tool in the middle school curriculum for several reasons: Critical Thinking: Writing argumentative essays encourages students to think critically. They must evaluate evidence, analyze different perspectives, and form their own opinions. Persuasive Writing Skills: Developing the ability to persuade others ...

  17. 8 Highly Engaging (and Controversial) Argumentative Mentor Texts for

    Teaching argumentative writing can get dry and dull fast resulting in decreased engagement. Utilizing well-written mentor texts about critical high interest topics is a great way to teach your entire argumentative essay unit while also engaging students in real conversations, critical thinking, and close reading.

  18. 3 Strong Argumentative Essay Examples, Analyzed

    Argumentative Essay Example 2. Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through female Anopheles mosquitoes. Each year, over half a billion people will become infected with malaria, with roughly 80% of them living in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  19. Elements of Argument & Persuasion Mini-Lessons for Middle School

    Mini-Lesson Set #1: Facts vs. Feelings Interactive Role Play with Discussion Questions → This is the role play summary I explained above. The goal here is to have students practice (and act out) examples of weak persuasion and examples of solid persuasion, keeping their audience in mind and thinking about logical arguments and counter-arguments in a respectful way.

  20. 25+ Argumentative Essay Examples

    Following is an example of middle school argumentative essay: Argument Essay Example For Middle School. Argumentative Essay Examples For High School PDFs . Here are some amazing argumentative essay examples for high school students. Read them and get an idea of how you can make your argumentative essay flawless.

  21. How to Write an A+ Argumentative Essay

    An argumentative essay attempts to convince a reader to agree with a particular argument (the writer's thesis statement). The writer takes a firm stand one way or another on a topic and then uses hard evidence to support that stance. An argumentative essay seeks to prove to the reader that one argument —the writer's argument— is the ...

  22. Argumentative Essay Examples & Samples That Worked

    Argumentative Essay Example for Middle School. If you are a middle-school student, you might be interested in an argumentative essay sample for middle school. Check out an example attached below and see how the arguments are built. Unlike other academic levels, the writing requirements for middle school are not strict. Here's a rubric you can ...

  23. 20 Easy and Free Argumentative Essay Examples for Students

    Body paragraph 1. The first body paragraph discusses the first and most important point related to the argument. It starts with a topic sentence and has all the factual data to make the argument convincing. Body paragraph 2. The second body paragraph mentions the second most important element of the argument.

  24. How One Tech Skeptic Decided AI Might Benefit the Middle Class

    David Autor, an M.I.T. economist and tech contrarian, argues that A.I. is fundamentally different from past waves of computerization.