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How to Conclude an Essay | Interactive Example

Published on January 24, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on July 23, 2023.

The conclusion is the final paragraph of your essay . A strong conclusion aims to:

  • Tie together the essay’s main points
  • Show why your argument matters
  • Leave the reader with a strong impression

Your conclusion should give a sense of closure and completion to your argument, but also show what new questions or possibilities it has opened up.

This conclusion is taken from our annotated essay example , which discusses the history of the Braille system. Hover over each part to see why it’s effective.

Braille paved the way for dramatic cultural changes in the way blind people were treated and the opportunities available to them. Louis Braille’s innovation was to reimagine existing reading systems from a blind perspective, and the success of this invention required sighted teachers to adapt to their students’ reality instead of the other way around. In this sense, Braille helped drive broader social changes in the status of blindness. New accessibility tools provide practical advantages to those who need them, but they can also change the perspectives and attitudes of those who do not.

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Table of contents

Step 1: return to your thesis, step 2: review your main points, step 3: show why it matters, what shouldn’t go in the conclusion, more examples of essay conclusions, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about writing an essay conclusion.

To begin your conclusion, signal that the essay is coming to an end by returning to your overall argument.

Don’t just repeat your thesis statement —instead, try to rephrase your argument in a way that shows how it has been developed since the introduction.

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Next, remind the reader of the main points that you used to support your argument.

Avoid simply summarizing each paragraph or repeating each point in order; try to bring your points together in a way that makes the connections between them clear. The conclusion is your final chance to show how all the paragraphs of your essay add up to a coherent whole.

To wrap up your conclusion, zoom out to a broader view of the topic and consider the implications of your argument. For example:

  • Does it contribute a new understanding of your topic?
  • Does it raise new questions for future study?
  • Does it lead to practical suggestions or predictions?
  • Can it be applied to different contexts?
  • Can it be connected to a broader debate or theme?

Whatever your essay is about, the conclusion should aim to emphasize the significance of your argument, whether that’s within your academic subject or in the wider world.

Try to end with a strong, decisive sentence, leaving the reader with a lingering sense of interest in your topic.

The easiest way to improve your conclusion is to eliminate these common mistakes.

Don’t include new evidence

Any evidence or analysis that is essential to supporting your thesis statement should appear in the main body of the essay.

The conclusion might include minor pieces of new information—for example, a sentence or two discussing broader implications, or a quotation that nicely summarizes your central point. But it shouldn’t introduce any major new sources or ideas that need further explanation to understand.

Don’t use “concluding phrases”

Avoid using obvious stock phrases to tell the reader what you’re doing:

  • “In conclusion…”
  • “To sum up…”

These phrases aren’t forbidden, but they can make your writing sound weak. By returning to your main argument, it will quickly become clear that you are concluding the essay—you shouldn’t have to spell it out.

Don’t undermine your argument

Avoid using apologetic phrases that sound uncertain or confused:

  • “This is just one approach among many.”
  • “There are good arguments on both sides of this issue.”
  • “There is no clear answer to this problem.”

Even if your essay has explored different points of view, your own position should be clear. There may be many possible approaches to the topic, but you want to leave the reader convinced that yours is the best one!

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how to start a conclusion to your essay

  • Argumentative
  • Literary analysis

This conclusion is taken from an argumentative essay about the internet’s impact on education. It acknowledges the opposing arguments while taking a clear, decisive position.

The internet has had a major positive impact on the world of education; occasional pitfalls aside, its value is evident in numerous applications. The future of teaching lies in the possibilities the internet opens up for communication, research, and interactivity. As the popularity of distance learning shows, students value the flexibility and accessibility offered by digital education, and educators should fully embrace these advantages. The internet’s dangers, real and imaginary, have been documented exhaustively by skeptics, but the internet is here to stay; it is time to focus seriously on its potential for good.

This conclusion is taken from a short expository essay that explains the invention of the printing press and its effects on European society. It focuses on giving a clear, concise overview of what was covered in the essay.

The invention of the printing press was important not only in terms of its immediate cultural and economic effects, but also in terms of its major impact on politics and religion across Europe. In the century following the invention of the printing press, the relatively stationary intellectual atmosphere of the Middle Ages gave way to the social upheavals of the Reformation and the Renaissance. A single technological innovation had contributed to the total reshaping of the continent.

This conclusion is taken from a literary analysis essay about Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein . It summarizes what the essay’s analysis achieved and emphasizes its originality.

By tracing the depiction of Frankenstein through the novel’s three volumes, I have demonstrated how the narrative structure shifts our perception of the character. While the Frankenstein of the first volume is depicted as having innocent intentions, the second and third volumes—first in the creature’s accusatory voice, and then in his own voice—increasingly undermine him, causing him to appear alternately ridiculous and vindictive. Far from the one-dimensional villain he is often taken to be, the character of Frankenstein is compelling because of the dynamic narrative frame in which he is placed. In this frame, Frankenstein’s narrative self-presentation responds to the images of him we see from others’ perspectives. This conclusion sheds new light on the novel, foregrounding Shelley’s unique layering of narrative perspectives and its importance for the depiction of character.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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Your essay’s conclusion should contain:

  • A rephrased version of your overall thesis
  • A brief review of the key points you made in the main body
  • An indication of why your argument matters

The conclusion may also reflect on the broader implications of your argument, showing how your ideas could applied to other contexts or debates.

For a stronger conclusion paragraph, avoid including:

  • Important evidence or analysis that wasn’t mentioned in the main body
  • Generic concluding phrases (e.g. “In conclusion…”)
  • Weak statements that undermine your argument (e.g. “There are good points on both sides of this issue.”)

Your conclusion should leave the reader with a strong, decisive impression of your work.

The conclusion paragraph of an essay is usually shorter than the introduction . As a rule, it shouldn’t take up more than 10–15% of the text.

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How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay

Kelly Konya

You’ve done it. You’ve refined your introduction and your thesis. You’ve spent time researching and proving all of your supporting arguments. You’re slowly approaching the finish line of your essay and suddenly freeze up because—that’s right—it’s time to write the conclusion.

How to write a conclusion

Before we dive into the details, here’s a basic outline of how to write a conclusion:

  • Restate your thesis: remind readers of your main point
  • Reiterate your supporting points: remind readers of your evidence or arguments
  • Wrap everything up by tying it all together
  • Write a clincher: with the last sentence, leave your reader with something to think about

For many, the conclusion is the most dreaded part of essay writing . Condensing all the points you’ve analyzed in a tidy little package is certainly easier said than done. How can you make a good final impression while emphasizing the significance of your findings? 

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Learning how to write a conclusion for an essay doesn’t need to feel like climbing Everest. It is wholly possible to tie everything together while considering the broader issues and implications of your argument. You just need the right strategy.

What do you want to leave your readers with? Perhaps you want to end with a quotation that adds texture to your discussion. Or, perhaps you want to set your argument into a different, perhaps larger context. 

An effective conclusion paragraph should ultimately suggest to your reader that you’ve accomplished what you set out to prove.

5 key details for writing a conclusion

1 restate your thesis.

As you set out to write your conclusion and end your essay on an insightful note, you’ll want to start by restating your thesis. Since the thesis is the central idea of your entire essay, it’s wise to remind the reader of the purpose of your paper. 

Once you’ve restated your thesis (in a way that’s paraphrased , of course, and offers a fresh understanding), the next step is to reiterate your supporting points.

2 Reiterate supporting points

Extract all of the “main points” from each of your supporting paragraphs or individual arguments in the essay . Then, find a way to wrap up these points in a way that demonstrates the importance of the ideas. 

Depending on the length of your essay, knowing how to write a good conclusion is somewhat intuitive—you don’t want to simply summarize what you wrote. Rather, the conclusion should convey a sense of closure alongside the larger meaning and lingering possibilities of the topic. 

3 Ask yourself: “So what?” 

At some point in your life, a teacher has probably told you that the end of an essay should answer the question “So what?” or “Why does it matter?” This advice holds true. It’s helpful to ask yourself this question at the start of drafting your thesis and come back to it throughout, as it can keep you in tune with the essay’s purpose. Then, at your conclusion, you won’t be left searching for something to say.

4 Add perspective 

If you’ve come across a fantastic quote in your research that didn’t quite make it into the essay, the conclusion is a great spot for it. Including a quote from one of your primary or secondary sources can frame your thesis or final thoughts in a different light. This can add specificity and texture to your overall argument. 

For example, if you’ve written an essay about J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye, you can think about using a quote from the book itself or from a critic or scholar who complicates your main point. If your thesis is about Salinger’s desire to preserve childhood innocence, ending with a biographer’s statement about Salinger’s attitude toward his own youth might be illuminating for readers. If you decide to amplify your conclusion paragraph in this way, make sure the secondary material adds (and not detracts) from the points you already made. After all, you want to have the last word!

5 Consider the clincher

At the very end of the essay comes your closing sentence or clincher. As you think about how to write a good conclusion, the clincher must be top of mind. What can you say to propel the reader to a new view on the subject? This final sentence needs to help readers feel a sense of closure. It should also end on a positive note, so your audience feels glad they read your paper and that they learned something worthwhile. 

What your conclusion should not include

There are a few things that you should definitely strive to avoid when writing your conclusion paragraph. These elements will only cheapen your overall argument and belabor the obvious.

Here are several conclusion mishaps to consider:

  • Avoid phrases like “in summary,” “in conclusion,” or “to sum up.” Readers know they’re at the end of the essay and don’t need a signpost. 
  • Don’t simply summarize what’s come before. For a short essay, you certainly don’t need to reiterate all of your supporting arguments. Readers will know if you just copied and pasted from elsewhere.
  • Avoid introducing brand new ideas or evidence. This will only confuse readers and sap force from your arguments. If there’s a really profound point that you’ve reached in your conclusion and want to include, try moving it to one of your supporting paragraphs. 

Whereas your introduction acts as a bridge that transfers your readers from their own lives into the “space” of your argument or analysis, your conclusion should help readers transition back to their daily lives. 

By following this useful roadmap, you can feel confident that you know how to write a good conclusion that leaves readers with a solution, a call to action, or a powerful insight for further study.

how to start a conclusion to your essay

how to start a conclusion to your essay

How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay

how to start a conclusion to your essay

By the time you get to the final paragraph of your paper, you have already done so much work on your essay, so all you want to do is to wrap it up as quickly as possible. You’ve already made a stunning introduction, proven your argument, and structured the whole piece as supposed – who cares about making a good conclusion paragraph?

The only thing you need to remember is that the conclusion of an essay is not just the last paragraph of an academic paper where you restate your thesis and key arguments. A concluding paragraph is also your opportunity to have a final impact on your audience. 

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How to write a conclusion paragraph that leaves a lasting impression – In this guide, the team at EssayPro is going to walk you through the process of writing a perfect conclusion step by step. Additionally, we will share valuable tips and tricks to help students of all ages impress their readers at the last moment.

Instead of Intro: What Is a Conclusion?

Before we can move on, let’s take a moment here to define the conclusion itself. According to the standard conclusion definition, it is pretty much the last part of something, its result, or end. However, this term is rather broad and superficial.

When it comes to writing academic papers, a concluding statement refers to an opinion, judgment, suggestion, or position arrived at by logical reasoning (through the arguments provided in the body of the text). Therefore, if you are wondering “what is a good closing sentence like?” – keep on reading.

What Does a Good Conclusion Mean?

Writing a good conclusion for a paper isn’t easy. However, we are going to walk you through this process step by step. Although there are generally no strict rules on how to formulate one, there are some basic principles that everyone should keep in mind. In this section, we will share some core ideas for writing a good conclusion, and, later in the article, we will also provide you with more practical advice and examples.

How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay _ 4 MAJOR OBJECTIVES THAT CONCLUSION MUST ACCOMPLISH

Here are the core goals a good conclusion should complete:

  • “Wrap up” the entire paper;
  • Demonstrate to readers that the author accomplished what he/she set out to do;
  • Show how you the author has proved their thesis statement;
  • Give a sense of completeness and closure on the topic;
  • Leave something extra for your reader to think about;
  • Leave a powerful final impact on a reader.

Another key thing to remember is that you should not introduce any new ideas or arguments to your paper's conclusion. It should only sum up what you have already written, revisit your thesis statement, and end with a powerful final impression.

When considering how to write a conclusion that works, here are the key points to keep in mind:

  • A concluding sentence should only revisit the thesis statement, not restate it;
  • It should summarize the main ideas from the body of the paper;
  • It should demonstrate the significance and relevance of your work;
  • An essay’s conclusion should include a call for action and leave space for further study or development of the topic (if necessary).

How Long Should a Conclusion Be? 

Although there are no strict universal rules regarding the length of an essay’s final clause, both teachers and experienced writers recommend keeping it clear, concise, and straight to the point. There is an unspoken rule that the introduction and conclusion of an academic paper should both be about 10% of the overall paper’s volume. For example, if you were assigned a 1500 word essay, both the introductory and final clauses should be approximately 150 words long (300 together).

Why You Need to Know How to End an Essay:

A conclusion is what drives a paper to its logical end. It also drives the main points of your piece one last time. It is your last opportunity to impact and impress your audience. And, most importantly, it is your chance to demonstrate to readers why your work matters. Simply put, the final paragraph of your essay should answer the last important question a reader will have – “So what?”

If you do a concluding paragraph right, it can give your readers a sense of logical completeness. On the other hand, if you do not make it powerful enough, it can leave them hanging, and diminish the effect of the entire piece.

Strategies to Crafting a Proper Conclusion

Although there are no strict rules for what style to use to write your conclusion, there are several strategies that have been proven to be effective. In the list below, you can find some of the most effective strategies with some good conclusion paragraph examples to help you grasp the idea.

One effective way to emphasize the significance of your essay and give the audience some thought to ponder about is by taking a look into the future. The “When and If” technique is quite powerful when it comes to supporting your points in the essay’s conclusion.

Prediction essay conclusion example: “Taking care of a pet is quite hard, which is the reason why most parents refuse their children’s requests to get a pet. However, the refusal should be the last choice of parents. If we want to inculcate a deep sense of responsibility and organization in our kids, and, at the same time, sprout compassion in them, we must let our children take care of pets.”

Another effective strategy is to link your conclusion to your introductory paragraph. This will create a full-circle narration for your readers, create a better understanding of your topic, and emphasize your key point.

Echo conclusion paragraph example: Introduction: “I believe that all children should grow up with a pet. I still remember the exact day my parents brought my first puppy to our house. This was one of the happiest moments in my life and, at the same time, one of the most life-changing ones. Growing up with a pet taught me a lot, and most importantly, it taught me to be responsible.” Conclusion:. “I remember when I picked up my first puppy and how happy I was at that time. Growing up with a pet, I learned what it means to take care of someone, make sure that he always has water and food, teach him, and constantly keep an eye on my little companion. Having a child grow up with a pet teaches them responsibility and helps them acquire a variety of other life skills like leadership, love, compassion, and empathy. This is why I believe that every kid should grow up with a pet!”

Finally, one more trick that will help you create a flawless conclusion is to amplify your main idea or to present it in another perspective of a larger context. This technique will help your readers to look at the problem discussed from a different angle.

Step-up argumentative essay conclusion example: “Despite the obvious advantages of owning a pet in childhood, I feel that we cannot generalize whether all children should have a pet. Whereas some kids may benefit from such experiences, namely, by becoming more compassionate, organized, and responsible, it really depends on the situation, motivation, and enthusiasm of a particular child for owning a pet.”

What is a clincher in an essay? – The final part of an essay’s conclusion is often referred to as a clincher sentence. According to the clincher definition, it is a final sentence that reinforces the main idea or leaves the audience with an intriguing thought to ponder upon. In a nutshell, the clincher is very similar to the hook you would use in an introductory paragraph. Its core mission is to seize the audience’s attention until the end of the paper. At the same time, this statement is what creates a sense of completeness and helps the author leave a lasting impression on the reader.

Now, since you now know what a clincher is, you are probably wondering how to use one in your own paper. First of all, keep in mind that a good clincher should be intriguing, memorable, smooth, and straightforward.

Generally, there are several different tricks you can use for your clincher statement; it can be:

  • A short, but memorable and attention-grabbing conclusion;
  • A relevant and memorable quote (only if it brings actual value);
  • A call to action;
  • A rhetorical question;
  • An illustrative story or provocative example;
  • A warning against a possibility or suggestion about the consequences of a discussed problem;
  • A joke (however, be careful with this as it may not always be deemed appropriate).

Regardless of the technique you choose, make sure that your clincher is memorable and aligns with your introduction and thesis.

Clincher examples: - While New York may not be the only place with the breathtaking views, it is definitely among my personal to 3… and that’s what definitely makes it worth visiting. - “Thence we came forth to rebehold the stars”, Divine Comedy - Don’t you think all these advantages sound like almost life-saving benefits of owning a pet? “So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”, The Great Gatsby

strategies

Conclusion Writing Don'ts 

Now, when you know what tricks and techniques you should use to create a perfect conclusion, let’s look at some of the things you should not do with our online paper writing service :

  • Starting with some cliché concluding sentence starters. Many students find common phrases like “In conclusion,” “Therefore,” “In summary,” or similar statements to be pretty good conclusion starters. However, though such conclusion sentence starters may work in certain cases – for example, in speeches – they are overused, so it is recommended not to use them in writing to introduce your conclusion.
  • Putting the first mention of your thesis statement in the conclusion – it has to be presented in your introduction first.
  • Providing new arguments, subtopics, or ideas in the conclusion paragraph.
  • Including a slightly changed or unchanged thesis statement.
  • Providing arguments and evidence that belong in the body of the work.
  • Writing too long, hard to read, or confusing sentences.

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Conclusion Paragraph Outline

The total number of sentences in your final paragraph may vary depending on the number of points you discussed in your essay, as well as on the overall word count of your paper. However, the overall conclusion paragraph outline will remain the same and consists of the following elements:

conclusion ouline

  • A conclusion starter:

The first part of your paragraph should drive readers back to your thesis statement. Thus, if you were wondering how to start a conclusion, the best way to do it is by rephrasing your thesis statement.

  • Summary of the body paragraphs:

Right after revisiting your thesis, you should include several sentences that wrap up the key highlights and points from your body paragraphs. This part of your conclusion can consist of 2-3 sentences—depending on the number of arguments you’ve made. If necessary, you can also explain to the readers how your main points fit together.

  • A concluding sentence:

Finally, you should end your paragraph with a last, powerful sentence that leaves a lasting impression, gives a sense of logical completeness, and connects readers back to the introduction of the paper.

These three key elements make up a perfect essay conclusion. Now, to give you an even better idea of how to create a perfect conclusion, let us give you a sample conclusion paragraph outline with examples from an argumentative essay on the topic of “Every Child Should Own a Pet:

  • Sentence 1: Starter
  • ~ Thesis: "Though taking care of a pet may be a bit challenging for small children. Parents should not restrict their kids from having a pet as it helps them grow into more responsible and compassionate people."
  • ~ Restated thesis for a conclusion: "I can say that taking care of a pet is good for every child."
  • Sentences 2-4: Summary
  • ~ "Studies have shown that pet owners generally have fewer health problems."
  • ~ "Owning a pet teaches a child to be more responsible."
  • ~ "Spending time with a pet reduces stress, feelings of loneliness, and anxiety."
  • Sentence 5: A concluding sentence
  • ~ "Pets can really change a child life for the better, so don't hesitate to endorse your kid's desire to own a pet."

This is a clear example of how you can shape your conclusion paragraph.

How to Conclude Various Types of Essays

Depending on the type of academic essay you are working on, your concluding paragraph's style, tone, and length may vary. In this part of our guide, we will tell you how to end different types of essays and other works.

How to End an Argumentative Essay

Persuasive or argumentative essays always have the single goal of convincing readers of something (an idea, stance, or viewpoint) by appealing to arguments, facts, logic, and even emotions. The conclusion for such an essay has to be persuasive as well. A good trick you can use is to illustrate a real-life scenario that proves your stance or encourages readers to take action. More about persuasive essay outline you can read in our article.

Here are a few more tips for making a perfect conclusion for an argumentative essay:

  • Carefully read the whole essay before you begin;
  • Re-emphasize your ideas;
  • Discuss possible implications;
  • Don’t be afraid to appeal to the reader’s emotions.

How to End a Compare and Contrast Essay

The purpose of a compare and contrast essay is to emphasize the differences or similarities between two or more objects, people, phenomena, etc. Therefore, a logical conclusion should highlight how the reviewed objects are different or similar. Basically, in such a paper, your conclusion should recall all of the key common and distinctive features discussed in the body of your essay and also give readers some food for thought after they finish reading it.

How to Conclude a Descriptive Essay

The key idea of a descriptive essay is to showcase your creativity and writing skills by painting a vivid picture with the help of words. This is one of the most creative types of essays as it requires you to show a story, not tell it. This kind of essay implies using a lot of vivid details. Respectively, the conclusion of such a paper should also use descriptive imagery and, at the same time, sum up the main ideas. A good strategy for ending a descriptive essay would be to begin with a short explanation of why you wrote the essay. Then, you should reflect on how your topic affects you. In the middle of the conclusion, you should cover the most critical moments of the story to smoothly lead the reader into a logical closing statement. The “clincher”, in this case, should be a thought-provoking final sentence that leaves a good and lasting impression on the audience. Do not lead the reader into the essay and then leave them with dwindling memories of it.

How to Conclude an Essay About Yourself

If you find yourself writing an essay about yourself, you need to tell a personal story. As a rule, such essays talk about the author’s experiences, which is why a conclusion should create a feeling of narrative closure. A good strategy is to end your story with a logical finale and the lessons you have learned, while, at the same time, linking it to the introductory paragraph and recalling key moments from the story.

How to End an Informative Essay

Unlike other types of papers, informative or expository essays load readers with a lot of information and facts. In this case, “Synthesize, don’t summarize” is the best technique you can use to end your paper. Simply put, instead of recalling all of the major facts, you should approach your conclusion from the “So what?” position by highlighting the significance of the information provided.

How to Conclude a Narrative Essay

In a nutshell, a narrative essay is based on simple storytelling. The purpose of this paper is to share a particular story in detail. Therefore, the conclusion for such a paper should wrap up the story and avoid finishing on an abrupt cliffhanger. It is vital to include the key takeaways and the lessons learned from the story.

How to Write a Conclusion for a Lab Report

Unlike an essay, a lab report is based on an experiment. This type of paper describes the flow of a particular experiment conducted by a student and its conclusion should reflect on the outcomes of this experiment.

In thinking of how to write a conclusion for a lab, here are the key things you should do to get it right:

  • Restate the goals of your experiment
  • Describe the methods you used
  • Include the results of the experiment and analyze the final data
  • End your conclusion with a clear statement on whether or not the experiment was successful (Did you reach the expected results?)

How to Write a Conclusion for a Research Paper

Writing a paper is probably the hardest task of all, even for experienced dissertation writer . Unlike an essay or even a lab report, a research paper is a much longer piece of work that requires a deeper investigation of the problem. Therefore, a conclusion for such a paper should be even more sophisticated and powerful. If you're feeling difficulty writing an essay, you can buy essay on our service.

How to Write a Conclusion for a Research Paper

However, given that a research paper is the second most popular kind of academic paper (after an essay), it is important to know how to conclude a research paper. Even if you have not yet been assigned to do this task, be sure that you will face it soon. So, here are the steps you should follow to create a great conclusion for a research paper:

  • Restate the Topic

Start your final paragraph with a quick reminder of what the topic of the piece is about. Keep it one sentence long.

  • Revisit the Thesis

Next, you should remind your readers what your thesis statement was. However, do not just copy and paste it from the introductory clause: paraphrase your thesis so that you deliver the same idea but with different words. Keep your paraphrased thesis narrow, specific, and topic-oriented.

  • Summarise Your Key Ideas

Just like the case of a regular essay’s conclusion, a research paper’s final paragraph should also include a short summary of all of the key points stated in the body sections. We recommend reading the entire body part a few times to define all of your main arguments and ideas.

  • Showcase the Significance of Your Work

In the research paper conclusion, it is vital to highlight the significance of your research problem and state how your solution could be helpful.

  • Make Suggestions for Future Studies

Finally, at the end of your conclusion, you should define how your findings will contribute to the development of its particular field of science. Outline the perspectives of further research and, if necessary, explain what is yet to be discovered on the topic.

Then, end your conclusion with a powerful concluding sentence – it can be a rhetorical question, call to action, or another hook that will help you have a strong impact on the audience.

  • Answer the Right Questions

To create a top-notch research paper conclusion, be sure to answer the following questions:

  • What is the goal of a research paper?
  • What are the possible solutions to the research question(s)?
  • How can your results be implemented in real life? (Is your research paper helpful to the community?)
  • Why is this study important and relevant?

Additionally, here are a few more handy tips to follow:

  • Provide clear examples from real life to help readers better understand the further implementation of the stated solutions;
  • Keep your conclusion fresh, original, and creative.

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So, What Is a Good Closing Sentence? See The Difference

One of the best ways to learn how to write a good conclusion is to look at several professional essay conclusion examples. In this section of our guide, we are going to look at two different final paragraphs shaped on the basis of the same template, but even so, they are very different – where one is weak and the other is strong. Below, we are going to compare them to help you understand the difference between a good and a bad conclusion.

Here is the template we used: College degrees are in decline. The price of receiving an education does not correlate with the quality of the education received. As a result, graduated students face underemployment, and the worth of college degrees appears to be in serious doubt. However, the potential social and economic benefits of educated students balance out the equation.

Strong Conclusion ‍

People either see college as an opportunity or an inconvenience; therefore, a degree can only hold as much value as its owner’s skillset. The underemployment of graduate students puts the worth of college degrees in serious doubt. Yet, with the multitude of benefits that educated students bring to society and the economy, the equation remains in balance. Perhaps the ordinary person should consider college as a wise financial investment, but only if they stay determined to study and do the hard work.

Why is this example good? There are several key points that prove its effectiveness:

  • There is a bold opening statement that encompasses the two contrasting types of students we can see today.
  • There are two sentences that recall the thesis statement and cover the key arguments from the body of the essay.
  • Finally, the last sentence sums up the key message of the essay and leaves readers with something to think about.

Weak Conclusion

In conclusion, with the poor preparation of students in college and the subsequent underemployment after graduation from college, the worth associated with the college degree appears to be in serious doubt. However, these issues alone may not reasonably conclude beyond a doubt that investing in a college degree is a rewarding venture. When the full benefits that come with education are carefully put into consideration and evaluated, college education for children in any country still has good advantages, and society should continue to advocate for a college education. The ordinary person should consider this a wise financial decision that holds rewards in the end. Apart from the monetary gains associated with a college education, society will greatly benefit from students when they finish college. Their minds are going to be expanded, and their reasoning and decision making will be enhanced.

What makes this example bad? Here are a few points to consider:

  • Unlike the first example, this paragraph is long and not specific enough. The author provides plenty of generalized phrases that are not backed up by actual arguments.
  • This piece is hard to read and understand and sentences have a confusing structure. Also, there are lots of repetitions and too many uses of the word “college”.
  • There is no summary of the key benefits.
  • The last two sentences that highlight the value of education contradict with the initial statement.
  • Finally, the last sentence doesn’t offer a strong conclusion and gives no thought to ponder upon.
  • In the body of your essay, you have hopefully already provided your reader(s) with plenty of information. Therefore, it is not wise to present new arguments or ideas in your conclusion.
  • To end your final paragraph right, find a clear and straightforward message that will have the most powerful impact on your audience.
  • Don’t use more than one quote in the final clause of your paper – the information from external sources (including quotes) belongs in the body of a paper.
  • Be authoritative when writing a conclusion. You should sound confident and convincing to leave a good impression. Sentences like “I’m not an expert, but…” will most likely make you seem less knowledgeable and/or credible.

Good Conclusion Examples

Now that we've learned what a conclusion is and how to write one let's take a look at some essay conclusion examples to strengthen our knowledge.

The ending ironically reveals that all was for nothing. (A short explanation of the thematic effect of the book’s end) Tom says that Miss Watson freed Jim in her final will.Jim told Huck that the dead man on the Island was pap. The entire adventure seemingly evaporated into nothingness. (How this effect was manifested into the minds of thereaders).
All in all, international schools hold the key to building a full future that students can achieve. (Thesis statement simplified) They help students develop their own character by learning from their mistakes, without having to face a dreadful penalty for failure. (Thesis statement elaborated)Although some say that kids emerged “spoiled” with this mentality, the results prove the contrary. (Possible counter-arguments are noted)
In conclusion, public workers should be allowed to strike since it will give them a chance to air their grievances. (Thesis statement) Public workers should be allowed to strike when their rights, safety, and regulations are compromised. The workers will get motivated when they strike, and their demands are met.
In summary, studies reveal some similarities in the nutrient contents between the organic and non-organic food substances. (Starts with similarities) However, others have revealed many considerable differences in the amounts of antioxidants as well as other minerals present in organic and non-organic foods. Generally, organic foods have higher levels of antioxidants than non-organic foods and therefore are more important in the prevention of chronic illnesses.
As time went by, my obsession grew into something bigger than art; (‘As time went by’ signals maturation) it grew into a dream of developing myself for the world. (Showing student’s interest of developing himself for the community) It is a dream of not only seeing the world from a different perspective but also changing the perspective of people who see my work. (Showing student’s determination to create moving pieces of art)
In conclusion, it is evident that technology is an integral part of our lives and without it, we become “lost” since we have increasingly become dependent on its use. (Thesis with main point)

You might also be interested in reading nursing essay examples from our service.

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The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Conclusions

What this handout is about.

This handout will explain the functions of conclusions, offer strategies for writing effective ones, help you evaluate conclusions you’ve drafted, and suggest approaches to avoid.

About conclusions

Introductions and conclusions can be difficult to write, but they’re worth investing time in. They can have a significant influence on a reader’s experience of your paper.

Just as your introduction acts as a bridge that transports your readers from their own lives into the “place” of your analysis, your conclusion can provide a bridge to help your readers make the transition back to their daily lives. Such a conclusion will help them see why all your analysis and information should matter to them after they put the paper down.

Your conclusion is your chance to have the last word on the subject. The conclusion allows you to have the final say on the issues you have raised in your paper, to synthesize your thoughts, to demonstrate the importance of your ideas, and to propel your reader to a new view of the subject. It is also your opportunity to make a good final impression and to end on a positive note.

Your conclusion can go beyond the confines of the assignment. The conclusion pushes beyond the boundaries of the prompt and allows you to consider broader issues, make new connections, and elaborate on the significance of your findings.

Your conclusion should make your readers glad they read your paper. Your conclusion gives your reader something to take away that will help them see things differently or appreciate your topic in personally relevant ways. It can suggest broader implications that will not only interest your reader, but also enrich your reader’s life in some way. It is your gift to the reader.

Strategies for writing an effective conclusion

One or more of the following strategies may help you write an effective conclusion:

  • Play the “So What” Game. If you’re stuck and feel like your conclusion isn’t saying anything new or interesting, ask a friend to read it with you. Whenever you make a statement from your conclusion, ask the friend to say, “So what?” or “Why should anybody care?” Then ponder that question and answer it. Here’s how it might go: You: Basically, I’m just saying that education was important to Douglass. Friend: So what? You: Well, it was important because it was a key to him feeling like a free and equal citizen. Friend: Why should anybody care? You: That’s important because plantation owners tried to keep slaves from being educated so that they could maintain control. When Douglass obtained an education, he undermined that control personally. You can also use this strategy on your own, asking yourself “So What?” as you develop your ideas or your draft.
  • Return to the theme or themes in the introduction. This strategy brings the reader full circle. For example, if you begin by describing a scenario, you can end with the same scenario as proof that your essay is helpful in creating a new understanding. You may also refer to the introductory paragraph by using key words or parallel concepts and images that you also used in the introduction.
  • Synthesize, don’t summarize. Include a brief summary of the paper’s main points, but don’t simply repeat things that were in your paper. Instead, show your reader how the points you made and the support and examples you used fit together. Pull it all together.
  • Include a provocative insight or quotation from the research or reading you did for your paper.
  • Propose a course of action, a solution to an issue, or questions for further study. This can redirect your reader’s thought process and help her to apply your info and ideas to her own life or to see the broader implications.
  • Point to broader implications. For example, if your paper examines the Greensboro sit-ins or another event in the Civil Rights Movement, you could point out its impact on the Civil Rights Movement as a whole. A paper about the style of writer Virginia Woolf could point to her influence on other writers or on later feminists.

Strategies to avoid

  • Beginning with an unnecessary, overused phrase such as “in conclusion,” “in summary,” or “in closing.” Although these phrases can work in speeches, they come across as wooden and trite in writing.
  • Stating the thesis for the very first time in the conclusion.
  • Introducing a new idea or subtopic in your conclusion.
  • Ending with a rephrased thesis statement without any substantive changes.
  • Making sentimental, emotional appeals that are out of character with the rest of an analytical paper.
  • Including evidence (quotations, statistics, etc.) that should be in the body of the paper.

Four kinds of ineffective conclusions

  • The “That’s My Story and I’m Sticking to It” Conclusion. This conclusion just restates the thesis and is usually painfully short. It does not push the ideas forward. People write this kind of conclusion when they can’t think of anything else to say. Example: In conclusion, Frederick Douglass was, as we have seen, a pioneer in American education, proving that education was a major force for social change with regard to slavery.
  • The “Sherlock Holmes” Conclusion. Sometimes writers will state the thesis for the very first time in the conclusion. You might be tempted to use this strategy if you don’t want to give everything away too early in your paper. You may think it would be more dramatic to keep the reader in the dark until the end and then “wow” him with your main idea, as in a Sherlock Holmes mystery. The reader, however, does not expect a mystery, but an analytical discussion of your topic in an academic style, with the main argument (thesis) stated up front. Example: (After a paper that lists numerous incidents from the book but never says what these incidents reveal about Douglass and his views on education): So, as the evidence above demonstrates, Douglass saw education as a way to undermine the slaveholders’ power and also an important step toward freedom.
  • The “America the Beautiful”/”I Am Woman”/”We Shall Overcome” Conclusion. This kind of conclusion usually draws on emotion to make its appeal, but while this emotion and even sentimentality may be very heartfelt, it is usually out of character with the rest of an analytical paper. A more sophisticated commentary, rather than emotional praise, would be a more fitting tribute to the topic. Example: Because of the efforts of fine Americans like Frederick Douglass, countless others have seen the shining beacon of light that is education. His example was a torch that lit the way for others. Frederick Douglass was truly an American hero.
  • The “Grab Bag” Conclusion. This kind of conclusion includes extra information that the writer found or thought of but couldn’t integrate into the main paper. You may find it hard to leave out details that you discovered after hours of research and thought, but adding random facts and bits of evidence at the end of an otherwise-well-organized essay can just create confusion. Example: In addition to being an educational pioneer, Frederick Douglass provides an interesting case study for masculinity in the American South. He also offers historians an interesting glimpse into slave resistance when he confronts Covey, the overseer. His relationships with female relatives reveal the importance of family in the slave community.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Douglass, Frederick. 1995. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself. New York: Dover.

Hamilton College. n.d. “Conclusions.” Writing Center. Accessed June 14, 2019. https://www.hamilton.edu//academics/centers/writing/writing-resources/conclusions .

Holewa, Randa. 2004. “Strategies for Writing a Conclusion.” LEO: Literacy Education Online. Last updated February 19, 2004. https://leo.stcloudstate.edu/acadwrite/conclude.html.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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How to write a conclusion to an essay

Which do you think count more: first impressions or last impressions?

A conclusion is the last impression that a reader will have of your essay: make it count!

Introduction to writing a conclusion

A conclusion is the final idea left with the reader at the end of an essay. Without it, an essay would be unfinished and unfocused.

A conclusion should link back to the essay question and briefly restate your main points drawing all your thoughts and ideas together so that they make sense and create a strong final impression.

A conclusion often includes a final thought or reflection to highlight the significance of the topic close topic The main focus of the essay. . It is usually a short paragraph.

Video about how to reflect on your main points in a conclusion

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Learn how to reflect on your main points in a conclusion to an essay

Reflecting on the argument

Before you write your conclusion, it is a good idea for you to look again at your ideas in the essay. It can be particularly useful to re-read your introduction and think about what you have realised and explored as you wrote the essay. Your conclusion can then sum up what you have understood more deeply about the literature text and the essay topic.

If you think of your essay as a type of argument, persuading the reader to a particular point of view, then the conclusion can be a powerful way of bringing together the most important aspects of your argument.

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How to Write a Conclusion Paragraph for an Essay

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  • An effective conclusion paragraph is vital to writing a successful college essay.
  • A strong conclusion restates the thesis, offers new insight, and forms a personal connection.
  • Be sure the conclusion doesn't introduce new arguments or analyze points you didn't discuss.

The first steps for writing any college essay are coming up with a strong thesis statement and composing a rough introduction . Once you've done that, you can collect information that supports your thesis, outline your essay's main points, and start writing your body paragraphs . Before you can submit the essay, though, you'll also need to write a compelling conclusion paragraph.

Conclusions aren't especially difficult to write and can even be fun, but you still need to put in effort to make them work. Ultimately, a strong conclusion is just as important as an effective introduction for a successful paper.

Here, we explain the purpose of a conclusion and how to write a conclusion paragraph using a simple three-step process.

The Purpose of a Conclusion Paragraph

A conclusion paragraph does :

  • Check Circle Summarize the essay's thesis and evidence to further convince the reader
  • Check Circle Elevate your essay by adding new insight or something extra to impress the reader
  • Check Circle Leave a personal impression that connects you more closely to the reader

A conclusion paragraph does not :

  • X Circle Summarize something the paper does not discuss
  • X Circle Introduce a new argument

How to Write a Conclusion in 3 Easy Steps

Step 1: restate your thesis claim and evidence.

The conclusion's primary role is to convince the reader that your argument is valid. Whereas the introduction paragraph says, "Here's what I'll prove and how," the conclusion paragraph says, "Here's what I proved and how." In that sense, these two paragraphs should closely mirror each other, with the conclusion restating the thesis introduced at the beginning of the essay.

In order to restate your thesis effectively, you'll need to do the following:

  • Check Circle Reread your introduction carefully to identify your paper's main claim
  • Check Circle Pay attention to the evidence you used to support your thesis throughout the essay
  • Check Circle In your conclusion, reword the thesis and summarize the supporting evidence
  • Check Circle Use phrases in the past tense, like "as demonstrated" and "this paper established"

Here's an example of an introduction and a conclusion paragraph, with the conclusion restating the paper's primary claim and evidence:

Introduction

It is a known fact that archaic civilizations with clearly defined social classes often survived longer than those without. One anomaly is seventh-century Civilization X. Close analysis of the cultural artifacts of the Civilization X region reveals that a social system that operates on exploitation, rather than sharing, will always fail. This lack of inclusion actually leads to a society's downfall. Excavated military objects, remnants of tapestries and clay pots, and the poetry of the era all demonstrate the clash between exploitation and sharing, with the former leading to loss and the latter leading to success.

In the 600s C.E., Civilization X survived because it believed in inclusion and sharing rather than exploitation. As demonstrated, the civilization was often aware of the choice between sharing with others and taking from them. The cultural artifacts from the era, namely military items, household objects, and verbal art, all indicate that Civilization X believed sharing ensured survival for all, while taking allowed only a few to survive for a shorter time.

Step 2: Provide New and Interesting Insight

In addition to restating the thesis, a conclusion should emphasize the importance of the essay's argument by building upon it. In other words, you want to push your ideas one step beyond your thesis. One intriguing insight at the end can leave your professor pondering your paper well after they finish reading it — and that's a good sign you turned in a well-written essay.

Note that the conclusion paragraph must only mention that this new idea exists and deserves some focus in the future; it shouldn't discuss the idea in detail or try to propose a new argument.

The new insight you raise in your conclusion should ideally come from the research you already conducted. Should a new idea come to you while writing the body paragraphs, go ahead and make a note to remind you to allude to it in your conclusion.

Here are some typical starting points for these new insights:

  • Check Circle A new idea that would have prompted you to redesign your thesis if you had the time
  • Check Circle A new angle that would further prove your thesis
  • Check Circle Evidence you found that refutes your claim but that you can justify anyway
  • Check Circle A different topic to which you can apply the same thesis and/or angles

Step 3: Form a Personal Connection With the Reader

The final step when writing a conclusion paragraph is to include a small detail about yourself. This information will help you build a more intimate bond with your reader and help them remember you better. Think of this step as an opportunity to connect the academic research to your and your reader's personal lives — to forge a human bond between the lines.

Formal essay-writing typically avoids first- and second-person pronouns such as "I" and "you." There are, however, two exceptions to this rule, and these are the introduction and conclusion paragraphs.

In the conclusion, you may use first-person pronouns to attempt to establish an emotional connection with the reader.

In the introduction, you may use the words "I" or "me" just once to clarify that the essay's claim is your own. In the conclusion, you may use first-person pronouns to attempt to establish an emotional connection with the reader, as long as this connection is related in some way to the overarching claim.

Here's an example of a conclusion paragraph that uses both first- and second-person pronouns to connect the thesis statement (provided above) to the student's own perspective on stealing:

Civilization X believed that invading Civilization Y would help them survive long, hunger-inducing winters. But all people go through moments when they crave security, especially in times of scarcity. I would certainly never consider taking the belongings of a neighbor, nor, I expect, would you. Yet we must consider the Civilization X artifacts that justify "taking" as signs of more than simple bloodthirst — they are also revelations of the basic human need for security. Perhaps if we had lived during the 600s C.E., you and I would have also taken from others, even while commanding others not to take from us.

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How to write an essay: Conclusion

  • What's in this guide
  • Introduction
  • Essay structure
  • Additional resources

The last section of an academic essay is the conclusion . The conclusion should reaffirm your answer to the question, and briefly summarise key arguments.  It does not include any new points or new information. A conclusion has three sections. First, repeat the thesis statement. It won’t use the exact same words as in your introduction, but it will repeat the point: your overall answer to the question. Then set out your general conclusions , and a short explanation of why they are important.

Finally, draw together the question , the evidence in the essay body, and the conclusion. This way the reader knows that you have understood and answered the question. This part needs to be clear and concise.

Conclusion example

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“Pay adequate attention to the conclusion.” Kathleen McMillan & Jonathan Weyers,  How to Write Essays & Assignments

Conclusions are often overlooked, cursory and written last minute. If this sounds familiar then it's time to change and give your conclusions some much needed attention. Your conclusion is the whole point of your essay. All the other parts of the essay should have been leading your reader on an inevitable journey towards your conclusion. So make it count and finish your essay in style.

Know where you are going

Too many students focus their essays on content rather than argument. This means they pay too much attention to the main body without considering where it is leading. It can be a good idea to write a draft conclusion before  you write your main body. It is a lot easier to plan a journey when you know your destination! 

It should only be a draft however, as quite often the writing process itself can help you develop your argument and you may feel your conclusion needs adapting accordingly.

What it should include

A great conclusion should include:

link icon

A clear link back to the question . This is usually the first thing you do in a conclusion and it shows that you have (hopefully) answered it.

icon - lightbulb in a point marker

A sentence or two that summarise(s) your main argument but in a bit more detail than you gave in your introduction.

idea with points leading to it

A series of supporting sentences that basically reiterate the main point of each of your paragraphs but show how they relate to each other and lead you to the position you have taken. Constantly ask yourself "So what?" "Why should anyone care?" and answer these questions for each of the points you make in your conclusion.

icon - exclamation mark

A final sentence that states why your ideas are important to the wider subject area . Where the introduction goes from general to specific, the conclusion needs to go from specific back out to general.

What it should not  include

Try to avoid including the following in your conclusion. Remember your conclusion should be entirely predictable. The reader wants no surprises.

icon - lightbulb crossed out

Any new ideas . If an idea is worth including, put it in the main body. You do not need to include citations in your conclusion if you have already used them earlier and are just reiterating your point.

sad face

A change of style i.e. being more emotional or sentimental than the rest of the essay. Keep it straightforward, explanatory and clear.

rubbish bin

Overused phrases like: “in conclusion”; “in summary”; “as shown in this essay”. Consign these to the rubbish bin!

Here are some alternatives, there are many more:

  • The x main points presented here emphasise the importance of...
  • The [insert something relevant] outlined above indicate that ...
  • By showing the connections between x, y and z, it has been argued here that ...

Maximise marks

Remember, your conclusion is the last thing your reader (marker!) will read. Spending a little care on it will leave her/him absolutely sure that you have answered the question and you will definitely receive a higher mark than if your conclusion was a quickly written afterthought.

Your conclusion should be around 10% of your word count. There is never a situation where sacrificing words in your conclusion will benefit your essay.

The 5Cs conclusion method: (spot the typo on this video)

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Good Conclusion Starters for Final Paragraphs

Laptop Icon With Good Conclusion Starters Examples

  • DESCRIPTION Laptop Icon With Good Conclusion Starters Examples
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The way you end a work of writing is just as important as the hook you use to capture readers’ attention and the content in between. The concluding paragraph or section of your paper should begin with words telling readers that the content is drawing to a close. Review some examples of good conclusion sentence starters so you’ll be able to craft appropriate endings of your own.

Characteristics of Effective Conclusion Starters

When it’s time to bring your work to an end, it’s important to sum up the key points or concepts rather than simply stopping abruptly. Conclusion starters are transitional phrases that let readers know they have reached the final part of a document. Conclusion starters should:

  • be just a few words that introduce the first sentence of the final paragraph or brief concluding section
  • let readers know that they have reached the beginning of the final section
  • make readers aware that what they’re about to read won’t provide new information
  • set readers expectations for how the work will be drawn to a close (such as a summary of main points, statement of need for additional research, or call to action)

Conclusion Starter Ideas for Essays and Speeches

Whether you’re a student in college, high school or middle school, chances are that you will be assigned to write quite a few essays and deliver many speeches or presentations. When deciding how to end an essay or a speech, you’ll need to choose a conclusion starter that’s appropriate for the overall tone .

Examples of conclusion paragraph starter words and phrases include:

  • all things considered
  • given these points
  • I feel we have no choice but to conclude
  • in conclusion
  • in drawing to a close
  • in light of this information
  • in my opinion
  • in the final analysis
  • nevertheless
  • now that you know
  • the logical conclusion seems to be
  • to summarize
  • upon considering all the facts
  • upon exploring the situation from multiple perspectives
  • what else can we conclude but that
  • what other conclusion can we draw from
  • when considered from the perspective of
  • when faced with the question of
  • with all this in mind

Sample Conclusion Starters for Research Papers

Since a research paper’s focus is on presenting the findings of a particular study, the conclusion usually focuses on major findings and their implications. For academic research papers , it is generally expected that the paper will end with a call for additional research in the form of further study of a similar topic or to explore a related research question . The tone should be formal, taking into account the extent to which readers would be expected to have advanced knowledge of the subject matter.

Phrases you might use to start your research paper conclusion include:

  • as a result
  • as expected, the results indicate
  • as indicated by the data
  • based on the evidence presented
  • based on the results of this study, it seems
  • based on what is known at this point in time
  • data seem to indicate
  • in light of these results
  • in the context of x , it seems that
  • surprisingly, the data revealed
  • the data clearly indicate
  • the data reveal
  • the major revelation from this study is
  • the results of this study demonstrate
  • the results of this study seem to indicate
  • to extrapolate from the data
  • upon analyzing the data
  • upon review of these findings
  • what this study reveals is
  • what we now know is
  • while additional research is needed
  • while further study is warranted
  • while these results seem to indicate
  • with results like these, it seems

Less Formal Conclusion Starter Examples

Some writing is much less formal than a research paper or school assignment, or you may even get assigned to write an informal essay that calls for more of a personal touch than an academic tone. In such cases, you may want to opt for a conclusion starter with a more laid-back, conversational tone like these examples.

  • after all has been said and done
  • as I see things
  • at the end of the day
  • beyond a shadow of a doubt
  • in a nutshell
  • in case you’ve wondered
  • in simple terms
  • my personal take on
  • on the whole
  • the time has come
  • to cut a long story short
  • to cut to the chase
  • to get to the heart of the matter
  • to plainly state the facts
  • to wrap this up
  • what are we to think about
  • what I believe to be true
  • what it boils down to
  • what I think is
  • when all is said and done
  • who knew that
  • without all the mumbo jumbo

Build Your Conclusion Writing Expertise

Writing good conclusions is certainly an important skill for all writers to have, from students to those who write or do public speaking for a living (and all writers in between). Now that you have some ideas of good conclusion starters, focus on how to write a conclusion in full. Begin by exploring some conclusion examples .

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100+ Good Conclusion Starters for the Last Paragraph

Table of Contents

Like the introductory paragraph, the conclusion paragraph should also be given utmost importance because it is the closing section of your essay or paper where you need to effectively convince your readers about your thoughts and arguments. Also, most importantly, when writing a conclusion paragraph, you should concisely present all the major points already discussed in the introduction and the body section of the essay. Do you know how to write a strong conclusion? If not, continue reading this post and learn how to write a good conclusion using perfect conclusion starters.

What is a Good Conclusion?

A conclusion is typically the last paragraph of an essay or research paper that provides a summary of the entire work. It is one of the most important parts of an essay because it shows your readers where your writing ends.

A good conclusion is one that

  • Provides a concise summary of the essay or research topic.
  • Helps the readers remember how strong your arguments were.
  • Encourages readers to post comments.
  • Draws attention to the evidence that backs up the arguments.

Conclusion Starters

Most of the time, writers finish their essays quickly, and some writers forget to include a concluding section in their writing. Therefore, you must be careful to effectively conclude your essay or research paper with powerful sentences or statements in order to emphasize your ideas on a particular topic.

Remember, when you write a strong paragraph , then obviously the key points that you have included in the last section of your essay or paper will easily get stored in your readers’ minds. If your conclusion is weak, then your readers will forget it quickly.

Occasionally, readers will regret selecting your topic for reading because of your poor conclusion. So, when you write the conclusion statement for an essay or research paper, remember the important steps and advice for writing a good conclusion and then craft it accordingly.

How to Write an Excellent Conclusion Paragraph?

Till now, we saw the significance of a good conclusion paragraph. Now, let us step forward and learn how to write a good conclusion paragraph.

Conclusion Starters Paragraph

Seriously, you can’t impress your readers if you don’t know to write a good conclusion. In order to conclude your essay powerfully, you can either ask provocative questions or include quotes, a warning, or a call to action.

Not just for essays, a specific structure should also be followed for writing a strong conclusion too. Your conclusion will be thoughtful and impressive only if you stick to a general conclusion outline or a standard conclusion structure containing the following elements.

  • A good conclusion starter
  • Summary of the main points presented in the body of your writing
  • A closing sentence

Points to Remember While Writing a Conclusion Paragraph

  • Never introduce a new idea or topic in your conclusion paragraph that was not covered in the introduction and body of your essay or research paper.
  • Don’t stress the insignificant parts of your essay. Always make an effort to draw attention to the main points you want your readers to understand.
  • The points made in the conclusion paragraph ought to be easy to remember for the readers.

What are Conclusion Starters?

The conclusion starters are the opening sentence in your concluding paragraph. It generally acts as a link between the body and the conclusion paragraph.

One of the significant things that should be used when writing a good conclusion paragraph of your essay is the conclusion starters. With the help of conclusion starters, you can inform your readers that you are about to wrap up your writing.

There are plenty of conclusion starters available in the English language. Usually, the concluding sentences’ paragraph structure will always vary depending on your writing type. However, the conclusion starters are the same for the essay types like compare and contrast, narratives, descriptive, and argumentative.

Conclusion Starters

List of the Best Conclusion Starters for Final Paragraphs

Listed below are some of the best conclusion starter on time business news examples ideas that you can use while writing the conclusion paragraph of your essay.

Simple Conclusion Starter Words

  • In conclusion
  • All aspects considered
  • In drawing to the closure
  • The logical conclusion seems to be
  • Considering the perspective of
  • Thus, it can be restarted
  • On considering the different facts presented in this work
  • On the whole

Conclusion Starters for Essays and Speeches

  • In my opinion
  • Nevertheless
  • As expressed
  • With all these in mind
  • In a nutshell
  • Now that we know
  • I think there is no option but to conclude
  • For this reason
  • When faced with the question of
  • Given these points
  • There is nothing else we can conclude but

Effective Conclusion Paragraph Starters for Students

  • To summarize
  • I conclude that
  • To sum it all up
  • To put it briefly
  • As a result
  • In the final analysis
  • For the most part
  • As a final point
  • All things considered
  • For these reasons
  • So, I have come to the conclusion that
  • To wrap it all up

Impressive Conclusion Starters

  • The summative conclusion is that
  • The broad conclusion
  • The study concluded
  • Towards this end
  • After all, has been said
  • I recommend that
  • The informative conclusion is that
  • Now you know why
  • From now on
  • Looking back
  • I hope you can now learn that
  • Last but not least
  • In the future
  • You should now consider it
  • I think I have shown that
  • Without doubt
  • The time has come to
  • I agree with that

Good Conclusion Starters for Research Paper

  • As per the final analysis
  • Based on the evidence presented
  • As expected, the results signify
  • Due to the result
  • In light of these findings
  • The data reveals
  • As per the data, it can be indicated
  • The significant revelations made by the study
  • Unexpectedly the data revealed
  • To assume from the data
  • The result of this research showcases
  • What the study reveals is
  • On reviewing these findings it can be stated
  • In the context of the concept
  • While further research is competent

A Few More Powerful Conclusion Starters

  • As I observe things
  • At the end of the day
  • After all, it has been told and done
  • To reach the core of the heart.
  • As per my perspective
  • To make a long story short
  • No one could have assumed that
  • As the time comes to wrap up
  • In a simple language
  • As stated in the introduction
  • I would like to say finally
  • One final idea
  • My conclusions are
  • The data indicate that
  • It is worth re-examining
  • The nexus between
  • As this paper demonstrates
  • After discussing
  • I’m looking forward to
  • It is my conviction that
  • My final bow is that
  • It is my sincere belief that
  • Through this research, we learn that
  • My verdict is that
  • The research proves that
  • That was the conclusion reached
  • The summative end is that

Final Words

In the list mentioned above, we saw the various conclusion starters you can use to start a conclusion paragraph. No matter what your topic is, you can make your speech or write-up memorable for your audiences with the help of a great and effective conclusion. If you wish to add value to your writing, then make sure to use any good conclusion starters at the beginning of your conclusion paragraph.

If you find it difficult to conclude your essay, then contact us and get assignment help from our professional writers who are experts in writing strong and powerful conclusion statements.

how to start a conclusion to your essay

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How to Write a Concluding Paragraph for a Persuasive Essay

Last Updated: February 13, 2024 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Jake Adams . Jake Adams is an academic tutor and the owner of Simplifi EDU, a Santa Monica, California based online tutoring business offering learning resources and online tutors for academic subjects K-College, SAT & ACT prep, and college admissions applications. With over 14 years of professional tutoring experience, Jake is dedicated to providing his clients the very best online tutoring experience and access to a network of excellent undergraduate and graduate-level tutors from top colleges all over the nation. Jake holds a BS in International Business and Marketing from Pepperdine University. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 178,924 times.

Jake Adams

Giving an Overview

Step 1 Re-read your paper or paper outline.

  • If it helps, print out a copy of the body of the paper and highlight the main points to be summarized.

Step 2 Summarize your main arguments.

  • For instance, "Gun laws should be changed to reflect the evolving needs of today's generations.”

Step 3 Avoid introducing any new ideas.

  • You can, however, create a call to action or end with a creative and engaging hook statement.

Step 4 Keep it brief.

  • Using the first sentence to restate the hypothesis in your introduction, in different wording
  • Writing the next 2-3 sentence to summarize the key arguments made in your paper
  • Having the last 1-2 sentences be a grand statement of conclusion, saying what your final findings are

Using Convincing Wording

Step 1 Try parallel sentences.

  • For instance, "Regular exercise reduces stress, improves your sleep, and promotes weight loss."

Step 2 Use strong, simple language.

  • For instance, instead of writing, "The traditional American Dream is not dead and gone," write, "The American Dream is not dead.”
  • However, keep in mind that in some cases, more elaborate wording may be necessary to drive home your point.

Step 3 Avoid being obvious.

Establishing the Relevance of Your Conclusion

Step 1 Use the

  • For example,"What will happen to small businesses as different industries continue to go digital?"

Step 2 Put out a call to action to engage your reader in a memorable way.

  • For example, "Being environmentally responsible is a necessary step for all people, in order to save the parts of nature that we have left."

Step 3 Present an ideal picture to improve your reader's relation to the text.

  • For example, "If this competitive nature of school work were replaced with a more community-based learning approach, we might see happier, healthier children."

Community Q&A

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  • ↑ Jake Adams. Academic Tutor & Test Prep Specialist. Expert Interview. 20 May 2020.
  • ↑ https://opentextbc.ca/writingforsuccess/chapter/chapter-10-persuasion/
  • ↑ http://penandthepad.com/write-concluding-paragraph-persuasive-essay-college-1412.html
  • ↑ http://examples.yourdictionary.com/parallel-structure-examples.html
  • ↑ http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/ending-essay-conclusions
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/common_writing_assignments/argument_papers/conclusions.html

About This Article

Jake Adams

To write a concluding paragraph for your persuasive essay, you’ll need to briefly summarize your main arguments. Use the first sentence to restate your hypothesis from your introduction in different words. Then, spend 2 or 3 sentences reminding the reader of the main arguments you made throughout the essay. Use strong, simple language to emphasize your conclusion. You can also add a call to action or tell the reader what you think should happen as a result of your conclusions. For example, "If this competitive nature of school work were replaced with a more community-based learning approach, we might see happier, healthier children." For more tips from our Teaching co-author, including how to position your arguments within the bigger picture, read on! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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how to start a conclusion to your essay

7 Tips for Using AI Writing Assistants to Improve Essay Writing in 2024

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In the rapidly evolving landscape of education and technology, AI writing assistants have become invaluable tools for students looking to enhance their essay writing skills.

As we step into 2024, the capabilities of these AI tools have expanded, offering more sophisticated features to aid in the writing process. Here are seven practical tips for leveraging AI writing assistants to streamline your essay writing efforts and significantly improve the quality of your work.

1. Start with a Clear Outline

Before diving into the writing process, use your AI writing assistant to help create a comprehensive outline. A well-structured outline serves as the backbone of your essay, ensuring that your ideas flow logically from one to the next. AI tools can suggest key points and subtopics based on your initial ideas, helping you to organize your thoughts more effectively. This preliminary step can significantly reduce writing time and improve coherence in your essays, making the overall writing process smoother and more focused.

Even though AI writing tools are getting better by the day, sometimes you may still need an expert writer to help you create a perfect essay outline. If so, you can hire a research paper writing service . Many online writing platforms are eager to step in and help streamline your writing process.

2. Enhance Your Vocabulary

One of the standout features of AI writing assistants is their ability to suggest synonyms and more complex vocabulary that fits the context of your sentence. This feature allows you to enrich your essays and avoid repetitive language that dulls your writing. However, it’s crucial to ensure that the suggested words align with the meaning you intend to convey and that they’re appropriate for your audience. Expanding your vocabulary through AI recommendations can elevate the sophistication of your writing and make your essays more engaging.

3. Improve Grammar and Syntax

Grammar and syntax errors can undermine the credibility of your essay, no matter how insightful your arguments are. AI writing assistants excel at identifying and correcting these mistakes, offering suggestions to refine your sentences. Beyond fixing errors, these tools can help restructure awkward or complex sentences, making your writing clearer and more concise. Regularly using AI for grammar and syntax checks teaches you to recognize and avoid common mistakes, gradually improving your writing skills.

4. Check for Plagiarism

Plagiarism is a serious offense in academic writing that can have severe consequences . Many AI writing assistants include plagiarism checkers that compare your work against vast databases of published material to ensure originality. Utilizing this feature can save you from unintentional plagiarism, giving you peace of mind that your work is unique. It’s a crucial step in maintaining academic integrity and fostering trust in your writing.

5. Gather Research and Citations

Researching and citing sources can be one of the most time-consuming aspects of essay writing. AI writing assistants can streamline this process by suggesting relevant articles, journals, and books based on your essay topic. Some tools even offer citation generation in various academic styles, simplifying the referencing process. By efficiently gathering and citing high-quality sources, you can strengthen your arguments and provide a solid foundation for your essay.

6. Receive Feedback on Coherence and Flow

A coherent essay with a natural flow keeps the reader engaged from beginning to end. AI writing assistants can analyze your essay’s structure and coherence, offering feedback on transitions, paragraph structure, and overall flow. This insight allows you to make adjustments that enhance the readability and effectiveness of your essay. Constructive feedback from AI tools can be a valuable learning experience, helping you develop a more refined writing style over time.

7. Practice and Learn from AI Suggestions

Perhaps the most significant benefit of using AI writing assistants is the opportunity for continuous learning and improvement. As you incorporate AI suggestions into your essays, take the time to understand why changes were recommended. This practice can deepen your understanding of effective writing techniques and common pitfalls. Embrace AI writing assistants as learning tools, and be open to experimenting with their suggestions to discover what works best for your style and objectives.

AI writing assistants have transformed how students approach essay writing in 2024, offering many features designed to improve writing quality, enhance efficiency, and ensure academic integrity. By leveraging these tools to create outlines, enrich vocabulary, correct grammar, check for plagiarism, streamline research, receive feedback, and learn from AI-driven suggestions, students can elevate their writing skills to new heights. Embracing the power of AI in the writing process not only leads to better essays but also fosters a deeper understanding of effective writing practices that will benefit students well beyond their academic years.

Author: Ammie Barger

Ammie Barger is a seasoned article writer and essayist known for her insightful analysis and compelling prose. With a talent for weaving complex ideas into accessible narratives, she has contributed to various publications, enriching readers with her deep dives into cultural and educational topics. Ammie’s work reflects her dedication to exploring the nuances of human experience through the written word.

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IMAGES

  1. Best Tips and Help on How to Write a Conclusion for Your Essay

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  2. How to Write a Strong Conclusion for Your Essay

    how to start a conclusion to your essay

  3. How to type a conclusion paragraph. How to Start a Conclusion Paragraph

    how to start a conclusion to your essay

  4. 3 Ways to Write a Concluding Paragraph for a Persuasive Essay

    how to start a conclusion to your essay

  5. How to write a conclusion in a college essay

    how to start a conclusion to your essay

  6. Conclusion Paragraph

    how to start a conclusion to your essay

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  1. writing : conclusion

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  3. This is how to write an essay from start to end using AI #researchwriting #literaturereview

  4. How to Start English Essay from Scratch (Part 02)

  5. How to write a first-class essay conclusion (with example)?

  6. How to write conclusion in task 2

COMMENTS

  1. How to Conclude an Essay

    Step 1: Return to your thesis To begin your conclusion, signal that the essay is coming to an end by returning to your overall argument. Don't just repeat your thesis statement —instead, try to rephrase your argument in a way that shows how it has been developed since the introduction. Example: Returning to the thesis

  2. How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay

    1 Restate your thesis As you set out to write your conclusion and end your essay on an insightful note, you'll want to start by restating your thesis. Since the thesis is the central idea of your entire essay, it's wise to remind the reader of the purpose of your paper.

  3. 3 Ways to Start a Conclusion

    1 Start with a transition sentence. If you are writing a conclusion to an essay or paper for school or college, it's important to understand the functions of the conclusion. Your conclusion shouldn't only restate the main points of your argument in a way that is disconnected from the rest of the text.

  4. Conclusions

    Conclusions |. Writing Advice: The Barker Underground Blog. Tips for Reading an Assignment Prompt. What Do Introductions Across the Disciplines Have in Common? Anatomy of a Body Paragraph. Strategies for Essay Writing: Downloadable PDFs. Brief Guides to Writing in the Disciplines. English Grammar and Language Tutor. Harvard Guide to Using Sources.

  5. How to Write a Conclusion: Full Writing Guide with Examples

    Topics General Guides How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay Written by Adam J. July 6, 2022 21 min read Share the article By the time you get to the final paragraph of your paper, you have already done so much work on your essay, so all you want to do is to wrap it up as quickly as possible.

  6. Conclusions

    One or more of the following strategies may help you write an effective conclusion: Play the "So What" Game. If you're stuck and feel like your conclusion isn't saying anything new or interesting, ask a friend to read it with you. Whenever you make a statement from your conclusion, ask the friend to say, "So what?" or "Why should anybody care?"

  7. How to write an essay conclusion

    A conclusion should link back to the essay question and briefly restate your main points drawing all your thoughts and ideas together so that they make sense and create a strong final...

  8. How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay

    Step 1: Restate Your Thesis Claim and Evidence The conclusion's primary role is to convince the reader that your argument is valid. Whereas the introduction paragraph says, "Here's what I'll prove and how," the conclusion paragraph says, "Here's what I proved and how."

  9. How to write an essay: Conclusion

    First, repeat the thesis statement. It won't use the exact same words as in your introduction, but it will repeat the point: your overall answer to the question. Then set out your general conclusions, and a short explanation of why they are important. Finally, draw together the question, the evidence in the essay body, and the conclusion.

  10. How to Write a Strong Essay Conclusion

    In this video, you'll learn how to write a strong essay conclusion paragraph that ties together the essay's main points, shows why your argument matters, and...

  11. How to Write a Conclusion: 9 Steps (with Pictures)

    For example, you may have opened your introduction with an anecdote, quote, or image. Bring it back up in your conclusion. Similarly, if you opened with a rhetorical question, you might offer a potential answer in your conclusion. 3. Include all of your points in your summary, rather than focusing on one.

  12. Conclusions

    A great conclusion should include: A clear link back to the question. This is usually the first thing you do in a conclusion and it shows that you have (hopefully) answered it. A sentence or two that summarise (s) your main argument but in a bit more detail than you gave in your introduction.

  13. How to Write a Conclusion (With Tips and Examples)

    An effective conclusion is created by following these steps: 1. Restate the thesis An effective conclusion brings the reader back to the main point, reminding the reader of the purpose of the essay. However, avoid repeating the thesis verbatim. Paraphrase your argument slightly while still preserving the primary point. 2.

  14. How To Write a Conclusion for an Essay: Expert Tips and Examples

    How To Write a Conclusion for an Essay: Expert Tips and Examples By Alvin Park , Staff Writer Updated January 5, 2023 Image Credits You've worked so hard on your essay, written the best introduction and body paragraphs known to humankind, and you're ready to leave it at that.

  15. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    Your thesis is the central claim in your essay—your main insight or idea about your source or topic. Your thesis should appear early in an academic essay, followed by a logically constructed argument that supports this central claim. A strong thesis is arguable, which means a thoughtful reader could disagree with it and therefore needs

  16. How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay (Examples Included!)

    Summarizing a lengthy essay into a single paragraph may seem very complicated. However, it might not be so. In this article, we will guide you on how to conclude an essay with a few examples. Summarizing a lengthy essay into a single paragraph may seem very complicated. However, it might not be so.

  17. Good Conclusion Starters for Final Paragraphs

    The concluding paragraph or section of your paper should begin with words telling readers that the content is drawing to a close. Review some examples of good conclusion sentence starters so you'll be able to craft appropriate endings of your own. Characteristics of Effective Conclusion Starters

  18. How to End an Essay: Writing a Strong Conclusion

    Method 1 Writing a Strong Conclusion Download Article 1 Start with a small transition. This isn't necessary, but it can help your essay flow seamlessly and cue the ending of your argument. Read the last sentence of the previous paragraph. What naturally comes to mind as a following sentence? Try using one of these transitional phrases: [1]

  19. 100+ Good Conclusion Starters for the Last Paragraph

    In order to conclude your essay powerfully, you can either ask provocative questions or include quotes, a warning, or a call to action. Not just for essays, a specific structure should also be followed for writing a strong conclusion too.

  20. 3 Ways to Write a Concluding Paragraph for a Persuasive Essay

    2. Summarize your main arguments. Your concluding paragraph should repeat the main points that you made within your paper in different words. Briefly summarize the key arguments that make up the body of your essay in a clear and concise manner. Make sure to include important keywords from each point in your conclusion.

  21. 7 Tips for Using AI Writing Assistants to Improve Essay Writing in 2024

    Here are seven practical tips for leveraging AI writing assistants to streamline your essay writing efforts and significantly improve the quality of your work. 1. Start with a Clear Outline. Before diving into the writing process, use your AI writing assistant to help create a comprehensive outline. A well-structured outline serves as the ...

  22. How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay (Examples Included!)

    There are many ways to start a conclusion. One such method could be to start with the revised version of your thesis statement that hints to the significance of your argument. After this, your conclusion paragraph can organically move on to your arguments in the essay. Let's take a look at an effective way of writing a conclusion for an essay: