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19 Top Ideas for a “Why I want to be a Teacher” Essay

Here are the 19 best reasons you would want to be a teacher that you can include in your essay:

  • To help children learn more effectively.
  • To ensure children have positive mentors.
  • To improve children’s lives.
  • To help future generations solve the problems of today.
  • To help the future generations become good citizens.
  • To inspire future generations to create a more equal world.
  • To give back to the community I grew up in.
  • To be a part of helping my community thrive.
  • To be a part of my community’s decision-making processes.
  • Because you have the patience for working with children.
  • Because you have compassion for children.
  • Because you want to learn from children.
  • Because you’re enthusiastic about learning.
  • Because you are a generous person.
  • Because you’re interested in learning how to teach difficult students.
  • Because you’re interested in learning how to work with difficult parents.
  • Because you’re interested in learning diverse strategies for teaching,
  • Because you’re interested in learning to master classroom management.
  • Because you’re interested in learning what works and what doesn’t in teaching.

The ‘Why I want to be a teacher’ essay is all about showing you have thought in-depth about what a teacher does and what their role is in society. It’s also about showing you think you’d be a good person to conduct that role.

The 9 Tips are split into five categories. You can scan this whole post or browse through the categories here:

This essay is hard to get right.

Most students write the exact same thing as one another with the same old cliché statements like “because I love kids” (ugh, wrong answer!). If you do this, your teacher will just give you an average grade (or worse).

You need your essay on “why you want to be a teacher” to be different – indeed excellent – so it stands out for your teacher.

I’ll show you how.

Why should you listen to me? Well, I’ve been teaching university students in education departments for 8 years. In that time I’ve marked several thousand essays by people aiming to become teachers. I know what essays get top marks and which ones are average. I also know exactly what mistakes students make that make their essays seem … dull.

So, let me get you started out by introducing 19 points that you should make in your essay on why you want to be a teacher. I’ll break these 19 points down into 5 separate categories. Check them out below.

Read Also: Is Being a Teacher Worth It? (Why I Quit a Good Job)

1. Definitely do not say “because kids are fun”. Do this instead.

The word ‘fun’ is a big red flag for markers. Too many people want to become teachers because they think it would be a fun profession. Or, they might think that they want to help children have fun . No, no, no.

This is an incorrect answer in your essay about why you want to become a teacher.

Yes, teaching is fun a lot of the time. And it is really nice to see students having fun based on activities you’ve set for them.

But society isn’t paying you to have fun, or even to make children have fun. You’re not going to be a child minder, aunt, uncle or clown. You’re going to be a professional who has a bigger social purpose than having fun.

Now, a lot of students say to me “But, students learn more when they’re having fun.” Sure, that might be true – but it’s not a central reason for teaching.

If making learning more fun is genuinely a reason why you decided to become a teacher, then you need to frame it in a way that shows the importance of teaching for the good of students. Here’s three better ways to say ‘because kids are fun’; for each on, we can start with “I want to become a teacher because…”:

  • I want to help children learn more effectively. You could say something like: …When I was in school, learning was hard and I therefore hated teaching. There were a lot of teachers who seemed uninspired and uninterested in whether their children are learning. I was inspired to become a teacher so I could help children like myself to learn in ways that are engaging, motivating and inspiring.
  • I want to ensure children have positive mentors. You could say something like: …Many children in the world don’t have positive mentors at home. A teacher is often the one person in a child’s life who is a stable mentor that the child can lean upon. I chose to become a teacher because I believe all children need a positive mentor that instils in them an interest in the world and a belief that they can make something of themselves.
  • I want to improve children’s lives. You could say something like: …Being a teacher will give me the power to make children’s lives better. Learning opens doors to new opportunities, ways of thinking and paths in life that children wouldn’t have had before me. I am inspired by the idea of helping a child who is sad, uncertain and lacks confidence to see their own potential for creating a fulfilling life for themselves.

All three of those ideas still skirt around the idea that helping children have fun is something you want to see happen, but they also point out that there’s something deeper here than the idea that children should have fun: they should have fun for a reason. That reason could be so they learn more, develop an interest in the world, or see that their lives are full of potential.

Note that in my three examples above, I never used the word ‘fun’: it’s too much of a red flag for your markers.

2. Explain how teaching helps the world! Here’s how.

Have you ever heard someone say that ‘Teaching is a noble profession’? Well, it is. And this is something you really should be talking about in your essay on why you want to become a teacher.

Your teacher will be impressed by your understanding that teaching is a profession that keeps the world turning. Without teachers, where would we be? Probably back in the dark ages where people couldn’t read or write, technology wasn’t advancing very quickly at all, and people mostly lived in ignorance of their world.

So, being a teacher is has a bigger social purpose. As a teacher, you’ll be an important piece of society. You’ll be one of the army of tens – no, hundreds – of thousands of people helping future generations to propel our world towards better days. Below are some ways teaching helps the world. You can start these off with “I want to become a teacher because…”

  • I want to help future generations solve the problems of today. Being a teacher gives you the opportunity to propel students to greater heights. The children in your classrooms will be the people who solve climate change (oh, goodness, I hope so!), create the technologies to make our lives more comfortable, and get us out of the ecological, economic and political messes we seem to have gotten ourselves into!
  • I want to help the future generations become good citizens. There’s a concept called the ‘ hidden curriculum ’. This concept points to the fact that children learn more at school than what’s in the tests. They also learn how to get along, manners, democratic values and the importance of sharing. These soft skills are more than just a by-product of education. They’re incredibly important for showing our students how to get along in our society.
  • I want to inspire future generations to create a more equal world. A lot of what we talk about at school are moral issues: what’s the right and wrong thing to do? How do our actions ensure or hinder equality of races, genders and social classes? As a teacher, you will be instilling in children the idea that the decisions they make will lead to a more or less equal world. And of course, we all want a more equal world for our children.

These points are some higher-order points that will help you teacher see that you’re becoming a teacher for more than ‘fun’. You’re becoming a teacher because you see the noble purpose in teaching. If you do this right, you’ll surely impress your teacher.

3. Discuss your commitment to community. Here’s how.

Teachers are at the center of communities. Parents take their children to school, drop them off, then go to work. They busily get on with their jobs: architect, shop assistant, nurse, builder, and so on… Then, they all come back at the end of the day to collect their children from school.

School is one of the few things that brings all of these different members of a community together. Parents gather around the pick up location to gather their kids, and there they stand around and chat about sports and politics and community issues.

School is at the heart of community.

And you, as a teacher, will be one of the respected members of that community: there to serve all the members of the community by helping to raise their children with the values of the community in which you live.

You can talk about this as a central reason why you want to be a teacher. How about you start off with: “I want to become a teacher because…”

  • I want to give back to the community I grew up in. You could say …I grew up in a close-knit community where we all looked out for one another. Being a teacher will give me the opportunity to give back to my friends and mentors in the town who need someone to raise their children who they trust will do a great job.
  • I want to be a part of helping my community thrive. You could talk about how you are from a growing community that needs good quality, respectable people who will educate future members of your community. As a teacher, you will be at the heart of ensuring your local town remains a great place to live.
  • I want to be a part of my community’s decision-making processes. Teachers hold a certain authority: they know how students learn, and they usually have a very deep understanding of what is best for children in order to ensure they thrive. You can talk about how you want to become a person with deep knowledge about the children in your community so you can help guide you community’s decisions around how to raise their young people.

Note that in this group of ideas, ‘community’ represents the close-knit town in which you live, whereas in point 2, I talked about ‘society’, which was the bigger picture of the future of our nation or world rather than just your town.

4. Discuss the personality traits you think you can bring to the role. Here’s how.

You should show how you have reflected on the requirements of the role of teaching and thought about whether you have the personality traits that are required.

Why? Well, you need to be able to show that you know what being a teacher is all about… and that you think you’d be good at it.

So, let’s dive in to 5 personality traits that teachers have, and how you can show you have those traits:

  • Patience. Patience is an enormously popular skill for teachers to have. You’ll have kids who just don’t understand concepts one iota, and you’ve got to sit there and work with them until they get it. It’s tedious, let me tell you!
  • Compassion. Patience and compassion go hand-in-hand. If you don’t feel empathy for the kid who’s struggling super hard at learning, you’ll get pretty mad and just give up. You might also say some mean things to the kid! So, compassion is really necessary if you want to become a good teacher.
  • Open minded. Teachers always need to be learning new things. We often talk about the importance of learning with students more than directly teaching If you set a student a task, you’ll be sending them out to gather as much information on the topic as possible. They’ll often come back with new knowledge and you will want to praise them for teaching you something new.
  • Enthusiasm. Let me tell you, when it’s Wednesday afternoon in the middle of a hot school week and everyone’s depressed and flat there’s one person to rally the troops: you! Teachers need to wake up every morning, put their happy face on, and march into the classroom with boundless enthusiasm. It’ll motivate your students and make them feel welcome in the learning environment.
  • Generosity. You need to be generous with your time and praise. You need to be constantly thinking about the students in your care and doing anything you can to help them learn, instil in them a love of learning, and give them the confidence to try anything. Teachers need to be very generous people.

There’s a ton more traits that make a good teacher that you can talk about. These are just a few. Go forth and learn more, and add them to your essay!

5. Conclude with the things you still need to learn. Here’s how.

One more thing: good teachers are constantly learning. As someone studying to be a teacher, you need to remember that there’s a long way to go before you have all the answers. Heck, I’ve been a teacher for nearly a decade and I’m not even half way towards knowing everything about being a good teacher.

So, conclude your essay by highlighting that you understand what the role of a teacher is in society and the key competencies required of a teacher; but then go further and mention your enthusiasm to learn more about the profession over the coming years.

Here’s 5 things you can mention that you still need to learn:

  • How to teach difficult students. Some students hate school – mostly because of their terrible experiences in the past. You need to learn to get through to difficult students, and this takes time and patience to learn the art of inspiring the uninspired.
  • How to work with difficult parents. Oh boy, you’ll have a lot of these. You can highlight this as one of the key things you want to work on in the coming years: again, you’ll need to draw on that skill of patience (as well as the skill of diplomacy ) when it comes time to deal with an angry parent.
  • Diverse strategies for teaching. There are a lot of different ways to go about teaching. Over the years you’ll pick up on the various strategies and tricks different teachers have to help children learn.
  • Classroom management. This is one of the hardest things young teachers need to learn. And really, it just takes time. Discuss how this is something you want to focus on, and how you’ll use mentors to really work on this skill.
  • What works and what doesn’t. Great teachers have this intuitive knowledge about what works and what doesn’t, all based upon their deep experience and trial-and-error. The only way to learn to teach is to do it. Over the coming years, you’ll be learning about this. A lot.

You’ll only need one or two paragraphs on this final point, but it’s a great way to end your essay on why you want to become a teacher. It’ll show your humility and eagerness to take on one of the noblest professions in the world.

If you want to learn to write a top notch conclusion, you might also like my post on the 5 C’s Conclusion method .

Before you finish up your essay, you might want to check out my awesome posts on how to improve your essays, like these ones:

  • How to write a killer Introduction
  • My perfect paragraph formula , and
  • How to edit your essay like a pro .

I promised 19 thoughtful points to make in your essay about why you want to be a teacher. Here they are, all summed up in one final list:

  • Say you want to help children learn more effectively.
  • Say you want to ensure children have positive mentors.
  • Say you want to improve children’s lives.
  • Say you want to help future generations solve the problems of today.
  • Say you want to help the future generations become good citizens.
  • Say you want to inspire future generations to create a more equal world.
  • Say you want to give back to the community you grew up in.
  • Say you want to be a part of helping your community thrive.
  • Say you want to be a part of your community’s decision-making processes.
  • Say you want to share your patience with your students.
  • Say you want to share your compassion with your students.
  • Say you want to learn from your students (be ‘open minded’)
  • Say you want to share your enthusiasm for learning with your students.
  • Say you want to share your generosity with your students.
  • Say you’re interested in learning how to teach difficult students.
  • Say you’re interested in learning how to work with difficult parents.
  • Say you’re interested in learning diverse strategies for teaching,
  • Say you’re interested in learning to master classroom management.
  • Say you’re interested in learning what works and what doesn’t in teaching.

Why I want to be a teacher essay

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

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Essay on Teacher for Students and Children

500+ words essay on teacher.

Teachers are a special blessing from God to us. They are the ones who build a good nation and make the world a better place. A teacher teaches us the importance of a pen over that of a sword. They are much esteemed in society as they elevate the living standards of people. They are like the building blocks of society who educate people and make them better human beings .

Essay on Teacher

Moreover, teachers have a great impact on society and their student’s life. They also great importance in a parent’s life as parents expect a lot from teachers for their kids. However, like in every profession, there are both good and bad teachers. While there aren’t that many bad teachers, still the number is significant. A good teacher possesses qualities which a bad teacher does not. After identifying the qualities of a good teacher we can work to improve the teaching scenario.

A Good Teacher

A good teacher is not that hard to find, but you must know where to look. The good teachers are well-prepared in advance for their education goals. They prepare their plan of action every day to ensure maximum productivity. Teachers have a lot of knowledge about everything, specifically in the subject they specialize in. A good teacher expands their knowledge continues to provide good answers to their students.

Similarly, a good teacher is like a friend that helps us in all our troubles. A good teacher creates their individual learning process which is unique and not mainstream. This makes the students learn the subject in a better manner. In other words, a good teacher ensures their students are learning efficiently and scoring good marks.

Most importantly, a good teacher is one who does not merely focus on our academic performance but our overall development. Only then can a student truly grow. Thus, good teachers will understand their student’s problems and try to deal with them correctly. They make the student feel like they always have someone to talk to if they can’t do it at home or with their friends.

Get the huge list of more than 500 Essay Topics and Ideas

Impact of Teachers on a Student’s Life

Growing up, our parents and teachers are the first ones to impact our lives significantly. In fact, in the younger years, students have complete faith in their teachers and they listen to their teachers more than their parents. This shows the significance and impact of a teacher .

how to write essay about teacher

When we become older and enter college, teachers become our friends. Some even become our role models. They inspire us to do great things in life. We learn how to be selfless by teachers. Teachers unknowingly also teach very important lessons to a student.

For instance, when a student gets hurt in school, the teacher rushes them to the infirmary for first aid. This makes a student feel secure and that they know a teacher plays the role of a parent in school.

In other words, a teacher does not merely stick to the role of a teacher. They adapt into various roles as and when the need arises. They become our friends when we are sad, they care for us like our parents when we are hurt. Thus, we see how great a teacher impacts a student’s life and shapes it.

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Essay on Teacher: Our Friend, Philosopher and Guide in 100, 250 & 300 Words

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  • Updated on  
  • Mar 22, 2024

essay on teacher

Teachers are like the guiding stars in our educational journey. They shine our path with knowledge and encouragement. A teacher is a person who helps us learn and grow. They are the ones who guide us through our education and help us to become the best versions of ourselves. Teachers come in all shapes and sizes, but they all have one thing in common: they are passionate about teaching. In this blog, we’ll explore the enchanting role of teachers through the eyes of a student, celebrating their invaluable contributions to our lives.

This Blog Includes:

Why are teachers important, sample essay on teacher in 100 words, sample essay on teacher in 250 words, sample essay on teacher in 300 words.

Teachers help mould today’s youth into the responsible adults of tomorrow. What teachers teach the children at their young age, makes an impact on the students that stays with them for the rest of their lives.

The power of moulding the next generation into great leaders lies in the hands of teachers. This holds the potential of uplifting the society in the near future. Indirectly, teachers are the key to transforming millions of lives all around the globe.

A teacher is a person who helps us understand ourselves. They are the supporters who help us through tough times. Teachers are important because they help us to become the best versions of ourselves. They are like superheroes with the power to ignite our curiosity and help us grow. They teach us numbers, alphabets, and fascinating stories. They are patient listeners, ready to answer our questions and wipe away our doubts. They inspire us to dream big and show us that with hard work, we can achieve anything. A teacher’s love is like a warm hug that makes learning exciting and enjoyable.

Also Read: Teacher Self Introduction to Students and Samples

Teachers are magical beings who turn the pages of our books into captivating adventures. Teachers create colorful classrooms where learning becomes joyous. Their dedication is seen when they explain complex problems in simple ways and solve problems in math and science. With smiles on their faces, they teach us history, nurture our creativity through art, music, and storytelling, and help us express our feelings and thoughts.

Apart from books, teachers also impart life lessons. They teach us to be kind, respectful, and responsible citizens. They show us the value of friendship and the importance of helping others. Teachers celebrate our achievements, no matter how small, and cheer us on during challenges.

A teacher is a person who has a profound impact on our lives. They are the ones who teach us the things we need to know to succeed in life, both academically and personally. They are also there to support us and help us through tough times.

There are many different qualities that make a good teacher. Some of the most important qualities include patience, understanding, and a love of teaching. Good teachers are also able to connect with their students and make learning fun. A good teacher can make a real difference in a student’s life. They can help students develop their talents and abilities, and they can also help them to become confident and self-motivated learners.

Also Read- How to Become a Teacher?

In a world, teachers are essential as they bridge the gap between the unknown and the known. They take the time to understand each student’s unique needs and help them modify and hone their skills. In this process of our learning, they become a friend, philosophers, and guides.

Teachers are more than just knowledge sharers. They are like gardeners, nurturing the seeds of kindness, respect, and responsibility in a student’s heart. They teach us to be a good friend and have empathy. They also encourage us to care for our planet, reminding us that we are its custodians.

As we journey through school, teachers become our guides, showing us the various paths we can take. They encourage us to discover our passions, whether it’s solving math puzzles, painting masterpieces, or playing musical notes. They celebrate our victories, whether big or small and help us learn from our mistakes, turning them into stepping stones toward success. 

A good teacher can make a real difference in a student’s life. They can help students to develop their talents and abilities, and they can also help them to become confident and self-motivated learners.

I am grateful for all the teachers who have helped me along the way. They have taught me so much, and they have helped me to become the person I am today. I know that I would not be where I am without them.

Remember, each day with a teacher is a new adventure, a new opportunity to learn, and a new chance to grow. So, young learners, let’s raise our hands and give a cheer to our teachers, the real-life magicians who make education a truly enchanting place to live.

Also Read – Self Introduction for Teacher Interview

Related Reads:-     

A. Here are two lines lines for a good teacher: Teachers are like shining stars guiding us to the path of knowledge. Teachers are our guardian angels.

A. A teacher is not an acronym, so there is no full form for it, yet some students exhibit affection for their teacher. It also allows one to express creativity. Following are some popular full forms of Teacher: T – Talented, E-Educated, A-Adorable, C-Charming, H-Helpful. E-Encouraging, R-Responsible.

A. A teacher is an educator or a person who helps one acquire knowledge and imparts wisdom through teaching methods.

This brings us to the end of our blog on Essay on Teacher. Hope you find this information useful. For more information on such informative topics for your school, visit our essay writing and follow Leverage Edu . 

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Becoming a Teacher: What I Learned about Myself During the Pandemic

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Introduction to the Article by Andrew Stremmel

Now, more than ever, we need to hear the voices of preservice teachers as well as in-service teachers during this pandemic. How has the pandemic affected them? In what ways has the pandemic enabled them to think about the need to really focus on what matters, what’s important? What were the gains and losses? These are very important questions for our time.  In this essay, Alyssa Smith, a senior studying early childhood education, attempts to address the lessons learned from her junior year, focusing on the positive aspects of her coursework and demonstrating an imaginative, growth mindset. This essay highlights the power of students’ reflection on their own learning. But I think it does so much more meaningful contemplation than we might expect of our students in “normal” times. Alyssa gains a new appreciation for this kind of active reflection—the opportunity to think more critically; to be more thoughtful; to stop, step back, catch her breath, and rethink things. As a teacher educator and her mentor, I believe this essay represents how the gift of time to stop and reflect can open space to digest what has been experienced, and how the gift of reflective writing can create a deeper level of thinking about how experiences integrate with one’s larger narrative as a person.

About the Author

Andrew Stremmel, PhD, is professor in early childhood education at South Dakota State University. His research is in teacher action research and Reggio Emilia-inspired, inquiry-based approaches to early childhood teacher education. He is an executive editor of  Voices of Practitioners .  

I’ve always known I was meant to be a teacher. I could feel my passion guide my work and lead my heart through my classes. So why did I still feel as if something was missing? During the fall of my junior year, the semester right before student teaching, I began to doubt my ability to be a great teacher, as I did not feel completely satisfied in my work. What I did not expect was a global pandemic that would shut down school and move all coursework online. I broke down. I wanted to do more than simply be a good student. I wanted to learn to be a great teacher. How was I supposed to discover my purpose and find what I was missing when I couldn’t even attend my classes? I began to fret that I would never become the capable and inspirational educator that I strived to be, when I was missing the firsthand experience of being in classrooms, interacting with children, and collaborating with peers.

It wasn’t until my first full semester being an online student that I realized the pandemic wasn’t entirely detrimental to my learning. Two of my early childhood education courses, Play and Inquiry and Pedagogy and Curriculum, allowed limited yet meaningful participation in a university lab school as well as engagement with problems of substance that require more intense thinking, discussion, analysis, and thoughtful action. These problems, which I briefly discuss below, presented challenges, provocations, possibilities, and dilemmas to be pondered, and not necessarily resolved. Specifically, they pushed me to realize that the educational question for our time is not, “What do I need to know about how to teach?” Rather, it is, “What do I need to know about myself in the context of this current pandemic?” I was therefore challenged to think more deeply about who I wanted to be as a teacher and who I was becoming, what I care about and value, and how I will conduct myself in the classroom with my students.

These three foundations of teaching practice (who I want to be, what I value, and how I will conduct myself) were illuminated by a question that was presented to us students in one of the very first classes of the fall 2020 semester: “What’s happening right now in your experience that will help you to learn more about yourself and who you are becoming?” This provocation led me to discover that, while the COVID-19 pandemic brought to light (and at times magnified) many fears and insecurities I had as a prospective teacher, it also provided me with unique opportunities, time to reflect, and surprising courage that I feel would not otherwise have been afforded and appreciated.

Although I knew I wanted to be a teacher, I had never deliberately pondered the idea of what kind of teacher I wanted to be. I held the core values of being an advocate for children and helping them grow as confident individuals, but I still had no idea what teaching style I was to present. Fortunately, the pandemic enabled me to view my courses on play and curriculum as a big “look into the mirror” to discern what matters and what was important about becoming a teacher.

As I worked through the rest of the course, I realized that this project pushed me to think about my identity as an educator in relation to my students rather than simply helping me understand my students, as I initially thought. Instead, a teacher’s identity is formed in relation to or in relationship with our students: We take what we know about our students and use it to shape ourselves and how we teach. I found that I had to take a step back and evaluate my own perceptions and beliefs about children and who I am in relation to them. Consequently, this motivated me to think about myself as a classroom teacher during the COVID-19 pandemic. What did I know about children that would influence the way I would teach them?

I thought about how children were resilient, strong, and adaptable, possessing an innate ability to learn in nearly any setting. While there were so many uncertainties and fear surrounding them, they adapted to mask-wearing, limited children in the classroom, and differentiated tasks to limit cross-contamination. Throughout, the children embodied being an engaged learner. They did not seem to focus on what they were missing; their limitless curiosity could not keep them from learning. Yet, because young children learn primarily through relationships, they need some place of learning that helps them to have a connection with someone who truly knows, understands, and cares about them. Thus, perhaps more than any lesson, I recognized my relationship with children as more crucial. By having more time to think about children from this critical perspective, I felt in my heart the deeper meaning children held to me.

My compassion for children grew, and a greater respect for them took shape, which overall is what pushed me to see my greater purpose for who I want to be as an educator. The pandemic provided time to develop this stronger vision of children, a clearer understanding of how they learn, and how my identity as a teacher is formed in relationship with children. I don’t think I would have been able to develop such a rich picture of how I view children without an in-depth exploration of my identity, beliefs, and values.

In my curriculum course, I was presented a different problem that helped me reflect on who I am becoming as an educator. This was presented as a case study where we as students were asked the question, “Should schools reopen amidst the COVID-19 pandemic?” This was a question that stumped school districts around the nation, making me doubt that I would be able to come up with anything that would be remotely practical. I now was experiencing another significant consequence of the pandemic: a need for new, innovative thinking on how to address state-wide academic issues. My lack of confidence, paired with the unknowns presented by the pandemic, made me feel inadequate to take on this problem of meaning.

To address this problem, I considered more intentionally and reflectively what I knew about how children learn; issues of equity and inequality that have led to a perceived achievement gap; the voices of both teachers and families; a broader notion of what school might look like in the “new normal”; and the role of the community in the education of young children. Suddenly, I was thinking in a more critical way about how to address this problem from the mindset of an actual and more experienced teacher, one who had never faced such a conundrum before. I knew that I had to design a way to allow children to come back into a classroom setting, and ultimately find inspiration for learning in this new normal. I created this graphic (above) to inform families and teachers why it is vital to have students return to school. As a result, I became an educator. I was now thinking, feeling, and acting as a teacher. This case study made me think about myself and who I am becoming as a teacher in a way that was incredibly real and relevant to what teachers were facing. I now found inspiration in the COVID-19 pandemic, as it unlocked elements of myself that I did not know existed.

John Dewey (1916) has been attributed to stating, “Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.” Learning may begin in the classroom, but it does not end there. Likewise, teaching is not a role, but a way of being. The ability to connect with children and to engage them meaningfully depends less on the methods we use than on the degree to which we know and trust ourselves and are willing to share that knowledge with them. That comes through continually reflecting on who we are in relation to children and their families, and what we do in the classroom to create more meaningful understanding of our experiences. By embodying the role of being an educator, I grew in ways that classroom curriculum couldn't prepare me for. Had it not been for the pandemic, this might not have been possible.

Dewey, J. 1916. Democracy and Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education . New York: MacMillan.

Alyssa Marie Smith  is currently an early childhood education student studying at South Dakota State University. She has been a student teacher in the preschool lab on campus, and now works as a kindergarten out of school time teacher in this same lab school. In the fall, she plans to student teach in an elementary setting, and then go on to teach in her own elementary classroom.

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Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers

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P LANNING, PARAGRAPHING AND POLISHING: FINE-TUNING THE PERFECT ESSAY

Essay writing is an essential skill for every student. Whether writing a particular academic essay (such as persuasive, narrative, descriptive, or expository) or a timed exam essay, the key to getting good at writing is to write. Creating opportunities for our students to engage in extended writing activities will go a long way to helping them improve their skills as scribes.

But, putting the hours in alone will not be enough to attain the highest levels in essay writing. Practice must be meaningful. Once students have a broad overview of how to structure the various types of essays, they are ready to narrow in on the minor details that will enable them to fine-tune their work as a lean vehicle of their thoughts and ideas.

Visual Writing Prompts

In this article, we will drill down to some aspects that will assist students in taking their essay writing skills up a notch. Many ideas and activities can be integrated into broader lesson plans based on essay writing. Often, though, they will work effectively in isolation – just as athletes isolate physical movements to drill that are relevant to their sport. When these movements become second nature, they can be repeated naturally in the context of the game or in our case, the writing of the essay.

THE ULTIMATE NONFICTION WRITING TEACHING RESOURCE

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  • 270  pages of the most effective teaching strategies
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Planning an essay

essay writing | how to prepare for an essay | Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers | literacyideas.com

The Boys Scouts’ motto is famously ‘Be Prepared’. It’s a solid motto that can be applied to most aspects of life; essay writing is no different. Given the purpose of an essay is generally to present a logical and reasoned argument, investing time in organising arguments, ideas, and structure would seem to be time well spent.

Given that essays can take a wide range of forms and that we all have our own individual approaches to writing, it stands to reason that there will be no single best approach to the planning stage of essay writing. That said, there are several helpful hints and techniques we can share with our students to help them wrestle their ideas into a writable form. Let’s take a look at a few of the best of these:

BREAK THE QUESTION DOWN: UNDERSTAND YOUR ESSAY TOPIC.

Whether students are tackling an assignment that you have set for them in class or responding to an essay prompt in an exam situation, they should get into the habit of analyzing the nature of the task. To do this, they should unravel the question’s meaning or prompt. Students can practice this in class by responding to various essay titles, questions, and prompts, thereby gaining valuable experience breaking these down.

Have students work in groups to underline and dissect the keywords and phrases and discuss what exactly is being asked of them in the task. Are they being asked to discuss, describe, persuade, or explain? Understanding the exact nature of the task is crucial before going any further in the planning process, never mind the writing process .

BRAINSTORM AND MIND MAP WHAT YOU KNOW:

Once students have understood what the essay task asks them, they should consider what they know about the topic and, often, how they feel about it. When teaching essay writing, we so often emphasize that it is about expressing our opinions on things, but for our younger students what they think about something isn’t always obvious, even to themselves.

Brainstorming and mind-mapping what they know about a topic offers them an opportunity to uncover not just what they already know about a topic, but also gives them a chance to reveal to themselves what they think about the topic. This will help guide them in structuring their research and, later, the essay they will write . When writing an essay in an exam context, this may be the only ‘research’ the student can undertake before the writing, so practicing this will be even more important.

RESEARCH YOUR ESSAY

The previous step above should reveal to students the general direction their research will take. With the ubiquitousness of the internet, gone are the days of students relying on a single well-thumbed encyclopaedia from the school library as their sole authoritative source in their essay. If anything, the real problem for our students today is narrowing down their sources to a manageable number. Students should use the information from the previous step to help here. At this stage, it is important that they:

●      Ensure the research material is directly relevant to the essay task

●      Record in detail the sources of the information that they will use in their essay

●      Engage with the material personally by asking questions and challenging their own biases

●      Identify the key points that will be made in their essay

●      Group ideas, counterarguments, and opinions together

●      Identify the overarching argument they will make in their own essay.

Once these stages have been completed the student is ready to organise their points into a logical order.

WRITING YOUR ESSAY

There are a number of ways for students to organize their points in preparation for writing. They can use graphic organizers , post-it notes, or any number of available writing apps. The important thing for them to consider here is that their points should follow a logical progression. This progression of their argument will be expressed in the form of body paragraphs that will inform the structure of their finished essay.

The number of paragraphs contained in an essay will depend on a number of factors such as word limits, time limits, the complexity of the question etc. Regardless of the essay’s length, students should ensure their essay follows the Rule of Three in that every essay they write contains an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Generally speaking, essay paragraphs will focus on one main idea that is usually expressed in a topic sentence that is followed by a series of supporting sentences that bolster that main idea. The first and final sentences are of the most significance here with the first sentence of a paragraph making the point to the reader and the final sentence of the paragraph making the overall relevance to the essay’s argument crystal clear. 

Though students will most likely be familiar with the broad generic structure of essays, it is worth investing time to ensure they have a clear conception of how each part of the essay works, that is, of the exact nature of the task it performs. Let’s review:

Common Essay Structure

Introduction: Provides the reader with context for the essay. It states the broad argument that the essay will make and informs the reader of the writer’s general perspective and approach to the question.

Body Paragraphs: These are the ‘meat’ of the essay and lay out the argument stated in the introduction point by point with supporting evidence.

Conclusion: Usually, the conclusion will restate the central argument while summarising the essay’s main supporting reasons before linking everything back to the original question.

ESSAY WRITING PARAGRAPH WRITING TIPS

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●      Each paragraph should focus on a single main idea

●      Paragraphs should follow a logical sequence; students should group similar ideas together to avoid incoherence

●      Paragraphs should be denoted consistently; students should choose either to indent or skip a line

●      Transition words and phrases such as alternatively , consequently , in contrast should be used to give flow and provide a bridge between paragraphs.

HOW TO EDIT AN ESSAY

essay writing | essay editing tips | Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers | literacyideas.com

Students shouldn’t expect their essays to emerge from the writing process perfectly formed. Except in exam situations and the like, thorough editing is an essential aspect in the writing process. 

Often, students struggle with this aspect of the process the most. After spending hours of effort on planning, research, and writing the first draft, students can be reluctant to go back over the same terrain they have so recently travelled. It is important at this point to give them some helpful guidelines to help them to know what to look out for. The following tips will provide just such help: 

One Piece at a Time: There is a lot to look out for in the editing process and often students overlook aspects as they try to juggle too many balls during the process. One effective strategy to combat this is for students to perform a number of rounds of editing with each focusing on a different aspect. For example, the first round could focus on content, the second round on looking out for word repetition (use a thesaurus to help here), with the third attending to spelling and grammar.

Sum It Up: When reviewing the paragraphs they have written, a good starting point is for students to read each paragraph and attempt to sum up its main point in a single line. If this is not possible, their readers will most likely have difficulty following their train of thought too and the paragraph needs to be overhauled.

Let It Breathe: When possible, encourage students to allow some time for their essay to ‘breathe’ before returning to it for editing purposes. This may require some skilful time management on the part of the student, for example, a student rush-writing the night before the deadline does not lend itself to effective editing. Fresh eyes are one of the sharpest tools in the writer’s toolbox.

Read It Aloud: This time-tested editing method is a great way for students to identify mistakes and typos in their work. We tend to read things more slowly when reading aloud giving us the time to spot errors. Also, when we read silently our minds can often fill in the gaps or gloss over the mistakes that will become apparent when we read out loud.

Phone a Friend: Peer editing is another great way to identify errors that our brains may miss when reading our own work. Encourage students to partner up for a little ‘you scratch my back, I scratch yours’.

Use Tech Tools: We need to ensure our students have the mental tools to edit their own work and for this they will need a good grasp of English grammar and punctuation. However, there are also a wealth of tech tools such as spellcheck and grammar checks that can offer a great once-over option to catch anything students may have missed in earlier editing rounds.

essay writing | Perfect essay writing for students | Essay Writing: A complete guide for students and teachers | literacyideas.com

Putting the Jewels on Display: While some struggle to edit, others struggle to let go. There comes a point when it is time for students to release their work to the reader. They must learn to relinquish control after the creation is complete. This will be much easier to achieve if the student feels that they have done everything in their control to ensure their essay is representative of the best of their abilities and if they have followed the advice here, they should be confident they have done so.

WRITING CHECKLISTS FOR ALL TEXT TYPES

writing checklists

ESSAY WRITING video tutorials

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How to Impress Teachers With Your Essay

Last Updated: February 27, 2018

wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. To create this article, 15 people, some anonymous, worked to edit and improve it over time. This article has been viewed 47,416 times.

Ever wonder what it takes to get the A? Course you have.

Essay Template and Sample Essays

how to write essay about teacher

Impressing Teachers with Your Own Essay

Step 1 Be creative.

  • If you talk about something briefly at the very beginning of your intro, refer back to it quickly in your conclusion. It'll remind your teacher you know how to write an essay and you know what you're doing.

Step 3 Utilize sentence structures to your advantage.

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • Never repeat yourself. Never repeat yourself. Never repeat yourself. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Be funny. It doesn't have to be laugh-out-loud humor (it can be though), but just say a little something here and there to make the teacher slightly smile when reading. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 1
  • Be creative. Creativity is your best friend, your best weapon, and your best gift. Express your creativity in your essay, and it'll rub off on your teacher. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 1
  • Don't overdo the humor or emotion. Too little and it's not effective. Too much and the teacher sees right through your pitiful attempt at writing a good essay. Like a spoonful of sugar, it takes just the right dose to work. Thanks Helpful 3 Not Helpful 0
  • Don't include the teacher in your essay. Know who you're addressing, but don't say "And in conclusion, that's why you're reading this essay now and why if I don't say anything in this sentence, you won't give me an A." Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

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Gallery Teachers

The top 8 essay writing tips for Teachers

Pritam Nagrale

Technology is just a tool. In terms of getting the kids to work together and motivating them, the teacher is the most important – Bill Gates

how to write essay about teacher

Teachers are the most important tool when it comes to education and educating young minds. Every genius has had humble beginnings wherein he was taught by a teacher.

Teaching is not an easy job. It often requires dealing with unruly children who just won’t listen. Since the pandemic, most schools started their lectures online, and teachers and students alike were forced to interact with each other with the use of technology.

Teachers have had to adapt and change their ways of teaching as the world shut down. They’ve had to learn new techniques and modify them to leverage your teaching. Just like when a person prepares to become a teacher with all the similar efforts, any  teacher has to adopt these new changes and techniques  as well.

Teaching things online can be more difficult than teaching your students physically in the classroom. You have to find new ways to grab your students’ attention and oftentimes this isn’t easy, especially when it comes to the subjects which students already find boring! 

Take essay writing, for example. How often have your students looked at you bored or in a disinterested manner only because you gave them a writing assignment? Writing can be fun and is a great form of expression. In this article, we’re going to talk about our top 8 essay writing skills, which you can share with your students and make essay writing a fun and easy task.

Top 8 essay writing tips

1). plan your essay.

Essays tell a story. Every piece that’s writing should have a natural flow to their piece, and this extends beyond the basics of introduction, body, and conclusion. When advising students on how to write essays, recommend listing all the points which you would like to make. Every point should have its own individual paragraph. Once you’ve listed the points, sort them out in a logical manner, a manner that makes the most sense. As the essay progresses, a story narrative gets developed, which is interesting to the readers. Also, logically, every paragraph should be a buildup towards the final paragraph.

2). Using clear topic sentences

There’s a clear goal to essay writing when it comes to schools which is to gain marks. Teach your students an effective way of getting maximum results when writing an essay. The first sentence to a paragraph sets a tone. The crux of your article should be explained when the marker reads the first sentence of a paragraph. Ideally, explain your paragraph first and then explain it by building on it by adding examples and explanations which back up your key points and show your knowledge.

3). Be source heavy

This will depend on the kind of essay which you are asking your students to write. If it’s on a topic which your  students need to do research  on, then focus on the importance of good research. It’s important to base your essay around facts so that your article is reliable. Reading up on your information is also important when it comes to learning or gaining more knowledge. The more you read up on facts, the more you’ll learn.

4). Write the body first, the introduction second, and the conclusion last

Writing an introduction is hard. You’ll have to compile the basic crux of your essay in the introduction part of your essay even before you have the entire essay, which is why we recommend that you focus on the body of the essay first and write an introduction when you have the basic flow of your essay written down. As long as the entire essay makes sense at the end, it doesn’t really matter the way you write it and how you begin. Writing the essay body first is just our suggestion as we believe it to be the most helpful way when it comes to writing essays.

5). Remember the tone and the voice of your essay

Are you expecting your students to write the essay in an active voice or a passive voice? Focusing on the language that you are using is equally important. An essay should be informative and should also connect with your audiences. No matter how great your article is technically, if it doesn’t resonate with your audiences and connects with them, then the marks your students will receive won’t probably be very high.

6). Make use of technology

When teachers are teaching online, it’s best to make  use of online tools  which make your life easier. When it comes to writing essays, websites such as essay punch can help guide your students when you can’t. They say that practice makes perfect, and on Essay punch, students can spend time practicing their skills and overcome their writers’ block, if any. Teachers are human too, and they can’t reach each and every student no matter how much they want to, and even if they do, this process can be tedious and taxing, which is why teachers must make the use of technology whenever they can to make their lives easier.

7). Create drafts

No writer writes an essay on the first go and doesn’t edit them. Editing is the process of making an essay better. Once a final copy is submitted, no matter how much they may want it back, it’s not possible, so insist on writing rough drafts for your essay first, making edits on that draft, and only when they’re fully confident should the essay be submitted. Oftentimes it may so happen that after writing an essay, the writer may want to delete the whole thing because it doesn’t make sense anymore. Tell your students that it’s okay. The more you write, the better your content will be and even great writers have once scrapped everything they’ve worked on and started fresh to gain better results.

8). Eliminate unnecessary words

Sometimes, writers make the mistake of over-explaining their point. Understanding where short explanations are enough is the key to not boring an examiner. Sometimes smaller words have bigger impacts and moreover, when it comes to essay writing in schools, remember that teachers have to go through several essays at a time of the same subject, making it a boring task and having to read lengthy paragraphs for a basic concept can be frustrating which is why it’s important to tell your students to make their essay as short, informative and creative as possible.

These are just some essay writing tips that we think teachers should know about.

In Conclusion

Ultimately any form of writing is an expression, and even though the topic you give your students might be the same, it can be surprising the way every student writes an essay differently and with a different point of view for you to read. Some of these rules may or may not work when it comes to writing a fictional story, as in fictional stories, the writer relies on his mind’s imagination and then pens down these thoughts in the form of an essay for you to read.

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The Beginner's Guide to Writing an Essay | Steps & Examples

An academic essay is a focused piece of writing that develops an idea or argument using evidence, analysis, and interpretation.

There are many types of essays you might write as a student. The content and length of an essay depends on your level, subject of study, and course requirements. However, most essays at university level are argumentative — they aim to persuade the reader of a particular position or perspective on a topic.

The essay writing process consists of three main stages:

  • Preparation: Decide on your topic, do your research, and create an essay outline.
  • Writing : Set out your argument in the introduction, develop it with evidence in the main body, and wrap it up with a conclusion.
  • Revision:  Check your essay on the content, organization, grammar, spelling, and formatting of your essay.

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Table of contents

Essay writing process, preparation for writing an essay, writing the introduction, writing the main body, writing the conclusion, essay checklist, lecture slides, frequently asked questions about writing an essay.

The writing process of preparation, writing, and revisions applies to every essay or paper, but the time and effort spent on each stage depends on the type of essay .

For example, if you’ve been assigned a five-paragraph expository essay for a high school class, you’ll probably spend the most time on the writing stage; for a college-level argumentative essay , on the other hand, you’ll need to spend more time researching your topic and developing an original argument before you start writing.

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Before you start writing, you should make sure you have a clear idea of what you want to say and how you’re going to say it. There are a few key steps you can follow to make sure you’re prepared:

  • Understand your assignment: What is the goal of this essay? What is the length and deadline of the assignment? Is there anything you need to clarify with your teacher or professor?
  • Define a topic: If you’re allowed to choose your own topic , try to pick something that you already know a bit about and that will hold your interest.
  • Do your research: Read  primary and secondary sources and take notes to help you work out your position and angle on the topic. You’ll use these as evidence for your points.
  • Come up with a thesis:  The thesis is the central point or argument that you want to make. A clear thesis is essential for a focused essay—you should keep referring back to it as you write.
  • Create an outline: Map out the rough structure of your essay in an outline . This makes it easier to start writing and keeps you on track as you go.

Once you’ve got a clear idea of what you want to discuss, in what order, and what evidence you’ll use, you’re ready to start writing.

The introduction sets the tone for your essay. It should grab the reader’s interest and inform them of what to expect. The introduction generally comprises 10–20% of the text.

1. Hook your reader

The first sentence of the introduction should pique your reader’s interest and curiosity. This sentence is sometimes called the hook. It might be an intriguing question, a surprising fact, or a bold statement emphasizing the relevance of the topic.

Let’s say we’re writing an essay about the development of Braille (the raised-dot reading and writing system used by visually impaired people). Our hook can make a strong statement about the topic:

The invention of Braille was a major turning point in the history of disability.

2. Provide background on your topic

Next, it’s important to give context that will help your reader understand your argument. This might involve providing background information, giving an overview of important academic work or debates on the topic, and explaining difficult terms. Don’t provide too much detail in the introduction—you can elaborate in the body of your essay.

3. Present the thesis statement

Next, you should formulate your thesis statement— the central argument you’re going to make. The thesis statement provides focus and signals your position on the topic. It is usually one or two sentences long. The thesis statement for our essay on Braille could look like this:

As the first writing system designed for blind people’s needs, Braille was a groundbreaking new accessibility tool. It not only provided practical benefits, but also helped change the cultural status of blindness.

4. Map the structure

In longer essays, you can end the introduction by briefly describing what will be covered in each part of the essay. This guides the reader through your structure and gives a preview of how your argument will develop.

The invention of Braille marked a major turning point in the history of disability. The writing system of raised dots used by blind and visually impaired people was developed by Louis Braille in nineteenth-century France. In a society that did not value disabled people in general, blindness was particularly stigmatized, and lack of access to reading and writing was a significant barrier to social participation. The idea of tactile reading was not entirely new, but existing methods based on sighted systems were difficult to learn and use. As the first writing system designed for blind people’s needs, Braille was a groundbreaking new accessibility tool. It not only provided practical benefits, but also helped change the cultural status of blindness. This essay begins by discussing the situation of blind people in nineteenth-century Europe. It then describes the invention of Braille and the gradual process of its acceptance within blind education. Subsequently, it explores the wide-ranging effects of this invention on blind people’s social and cultural lives.

Write your essay introduction

The body of your essay is where you make arguments supporting your thesis, provide evidence, and develop your ideas. Its purpose is to present, interpret, and analyze the information and sources you have gathered to support your argument.

Length of the body text

The length of the body depends on the type of essay. On average, the body comprises 60–80% of your essay. For a high school essay, this could be just three paragraphs, but for a graduate school essay of 6,000 words, the body could take up 8–10 pages.

Paragraph structure

To give your essay a clear structure , it is important to organize it into paragraphs . Each paragraph should be centered around one main point or idea.

That idea is introduced in a  topic sentence . The topic sentence should generally lead on from the previous paragraph and introduce the point to be made in this paragraph. Transition words can be used to create clear connections between sentences.

After the topic sentence, present evidence such as data, examples, or quotes from relevant sources. Be sure to interpret and explain the evidence, and show how it helps develop your overall argument.

Lack of access to reading and writing put blind people at a serious disadvantage in nineteenth-century society. Text was one of the primary methods through which people engaged with culture, communicated with others, and accessed information; without a well-developed reading system that did not rely on sight, blind people were excluded from social participation (Weygand, 2009). While disabled people in general suffered from discrimination, blindness was widely viewed as the worst disability, and it was commonly believed that blind people were incapable of pursuing a profession or improving themselves through culture (Weygand, 2009). This demonstrates the importance of reading and writing to social status at the time: without access to text, it was considered impossible to fully participate in society. Blind people were excluded from the sighted world, but also entirely dependent on sighted people for information and education.

See the full essay example

The conclusion is the final paragraph of an essay. It should generally take up no more than 10–15% of the text . A strong essay conclusion :

  • Returns to your thesis
  • Ties together your main points
  • Shows why your argument matters

A great conclusion should finish with a memorable or impactful sentence that leaves the reader with a strong final impression.

What not to include in a conclusion

To make your essay’s conclusion as strong as possible, there are a few things you should avoid. The most common mistakes are:

  • Including new arguments or evidence
  • Undermining your arguments (e.g. “This is just one approach of many”)
  • Using concluding phrases like “To sum up…” or “In conclusion…”

Braille paved the way for dramatic cultural changes in the way blind people were treated and the opportunities available to them. Louis Braille’s innovation was to reimagine existing reading systems from a blind perspective, and the success of this invention required sighted teachers to adapt to their students’ reality instead of the other way around. In this sense, Braille helped drive broader social changes in the status of blindness. New accessibility tools provide practical advantages to those who need them, but they can also change the perspectives and attitudes of those who do not.

Write your essay conclusion

Checklist: Essay

My essay follows the requirements of the assignment (topic and length ).

My introduction sparks the reader’s interest and provides any necessary background information on the topic.

My introduction contains a thesis statement that states the focus and position of the essay.

I use paragraphs to structure the essay.

I use topic sentences to introduce each paragraph.

Each paragraph has a single focus and a clear connection to the thesis statement.

I make clear transitions between paragraphs and ideas.

My conclusion doesn’t just repeat my points, but draws connections between arguments.

I don’t introduce new arguments or evidence in the conclusion.

I have given an in-text citation for every quote or piece of information I got from another source.

I have included a reference page at the end of my essay, listing full details of all my sources.

My citations and references are correctly formatted according to the required citation style .

My essay has an interesting and informative title.

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An essay is a focused piece of writing that explains, argues, describes, or narrates.

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Writing Beginner

How to Describe a Teacher in Writing (100+ Examples & Guide)

Ever noticed how certain teachers linger in your memory long after you’ve left the classroom?

It’s often not just what they teach, but how they teach and who they are as a human being.

Here is how to describe a teacher in writing:

Describe a teacher in writing by focusing on their appearance, teaching style, classroom environment, interactions with students, and voice. Mention attire, posture, teaching methods, classroom decor, communication style, and speech characteristics to create a vivid portrayal.

In this article, you’ll learn everything you need to know about how to describe a teacher in writing.

Types of Teachers to Describe

Teacher in glasses holding a coffee - how to describe a teacher in writing

Table of Contents

I have a soft spot in my heart for teachers – some of my family are teachers and a teacher changed my life when I was a kid.

There are at least five common types of teachers that you can describe in writing.

  • The Inspirational Mentor : Charismatic and passionate, this teacher type ignites a love for learning.
  • The Strict Disciplinarian : Known for their firm rules, they command respect and instill discipline.
  • The Innovator : Always on the cutting edge of teaching methods and technology.
  • The Supportive Confidant : Approachable and empathetic, they often become students’ trusted advisors.
  • The Old-School Traditionalist : Sticks to classic teaching methods and often has a wealth of experience.

How to Describe a Teacher’s Appearance

When describing a teacher’s appearance, consider not only their clothing but also the subtleties of their personal style.

Is their attire crisply formal, suggesting a no-nonsense approach, or do they prefer comfortable, approachable clothing that reflects a more relaxed teaching philosophy?

The way they groom themselves, from neatly trimmed hair to a more carefree look, can also say much about their personality.

Pay attention to their posture: a straight-backed, authoritative stance versus a relaxed, open posture can convey very different messages.

Observe their gestures: are they expansive and expressive or more reserved and precise?

Facial expressions are equally telling – a constant smile can indicate warmth and approachability, while a more serious demeanor might suggest a more disciplined approach to teaching.

  • Mr. Jenkins always wore crisp suits, his tie perfectly knotted, exuding an air of formality.
  • Ms. Rivera’s flowing skirts and colorful scarves mirrored her creative teaching style.
  • Dr. Lee’s glasses perched on the tip of his nose, eyes twinkling behind them with a hint of humor.
  • Coach Thompson’s athletic attire and energetic stride reflected his dynamic personality.
  • Mrs. Smith’s hair was always in a neat bun, echoing her organized and methodical approach.
  • Mr. Patel’s warm, constant smile made students feel immediately at ease.
  • Ms. Johnson’s quirky jewelry and bright sneakers showed her playful side.
  • Mr. Grey’s stern expression rarely changed, commanding respect and attention.
  • Ms. Thompson’s casual jeans and t-shirts made her seem more like a friend than a strict teacher.
  • Dr. Anderson’s posture was always upright, exuding a sense of confidence and authority.

How to Describe a Teacher’s Teaching Style

A teacher’s teaching style is a window into their educational philosophy and personality.

Some teachers prefer a highly interactive style, encouraging lively discussions and group activities, fostering a dynamic learning environment.

Others might lean towards a more traditional, lecture-based approach, imparting knowledge in a structured, methodical manner.

Consider if they favor hands-on learning experiences, allowing students to explore and discover through practical activities.

Do they integrate storytelling into their lessons, making learning more engaging and memorable? Technology usage is another aspect to consider; are they adept at incorporating digital tools and multimedia into their lessons?

Their teaching style can also reveal their adaptability, patience, and how they cater to different learning styles within the classroom.

  • Mr. Brown’s lectures were filled with fascinating historical stories, bringing the past to life.
  • Ms. Kim’s classroom buzzed with group discussions and collaborative projects.
  • Mrs. Allen preferred quiet, focused individual work, guiding students through complex problems.
  • Mr. Harris used technology seamlessly, his slideshows and videos making learning more interactive.
  • Dr. Martin’s hands-on experiments made her biology classes exciting and insightful.
  • Ms. Lopez often took her class outside, believing in learning through nature and exploration.
  • Mr. Wilson’s teaching was flexible, adapting to the needs and interests of his students.
  • Ms. Davis was patient, ensuring every student understood the concept before moving on.
  • Mr. Khan’s math classes were a mix of traditional methods and innovative problem-solving activities.
  • Dr. Roberts had a knack for simplifying complex theories, making them accessible to all students.

How to Describe a Teacher’s Classroom

The layout and decoration of a teacher’s classroom can be a reflection of their teaching style and personality.

A neatly organized, minimally decorated classroom might suggest a teacher who values order and structure, focusing on discipline and efficiency.

On the other hand, a classroom filled with vibrant artwork, student projects, and creative displays could indicate a teacher who encourages creativity and self-expression.

Consider the arrangement of desks – are they in traditional rows facing the front, promoting an individual learning experience, or are they arranged in groups to facilitate collaboration? The presence of technology, like smartboards or computers, can also hint at a teacher’s inclination towards modern teaching methods.

Even the lighting, whether bright and invigorating or soft and calming, plays a role in setting the classroom’s mood and atmosphere.

  • Mr. Clarke’s classroom was a kaleidoscope of student art and colorful educational posters.
  • In Ms. Hall’s room, desks were arranged in circles to encourage open discussion.
  • Dr. Edwards’ classroom was minimalistic, with a focus on a clear, uncluttered learning space.
  • Mrs. Lopez had a cozy reading corner, filled with cushions and a variety of books.
  • Mr. Chang’s high-tech classroom had the latest gadgets, perfect for his computer science lessons.
  • Ms. Foster’s room was bathed in warm, soft light, creating a relaxed and welcoming atmosphere.
  • Mr. Thompson had a traditional setup with rows of desks, each student facing the front.
  • In Ms. Patel’s classroom, plants and nature-inspired decor created a serene learning environment.
  • Dr. Gomez’s walls were adorned with historical timelines and maps, complementing his teaching.
  • Mrs. Jennings’ room had flexible seating options, allowing students to choose where they learned best.

How to Describe a Teacher’s Interaction with Students

How a teacher talks and acts with their students is really important. It’s part of how they teach and can change how the classroom feels.

Some teachers maintain a formal and authoritative distance, ensuring a disciplined and structured classroom.

Others foster a more relaxed and friendly atmosphere, where students feel comfortable participating and expressing their opinions.

Observe how they respond to questions – are they patient and encouraging, or do they prefer quick, concise answers? How do they handle conflicts or disruptions?

A teacher who navigates these situations with calm and fairness can create a safe and respectful learning space.

Their approach to feedback, whether constructive and supportive or more critical, can also affect students’ confidence and willingness to engage in the learning process.

  • Mr. Hughes always had time for every student’s question, his responses thoughtful and thorough.
  • Mrs. Garcia navigated classroom conflicts with a fair and unbiased approach.
  • Mr. Ellis’ feedback was always constructive, aimed at helping students improve.
  • Ms. Wright’s classroom was a hub of lively debates, encouraging students to voice their opinions.
  • Dr. Kumar’s calm demeanor helped maintain a peaceful and focused classroom environment.
  • Ms. Chen’s encouragement and praise boosted her students’ confidence.
  • Mr. Bradley maintained strict classroom discipline, but was always fair in his decisions.
  • In Ms. Johnson’s class, every student felt heard and valued.
  • Mrs. Smith was known for her patience, especially with students who needed extra help.
  • Dr. Lee often used humor to defuse tension, keeping the classroom atmosphere light and engaging.

How to Describe a Teacher’s Voice and Speech Style

The way a teacher speaks can leave a lasting impression on students.

An authoritative voice, clear and firm, can command attention and convey confidence. A gentle, soft-spoken teacher might create a calm and soothing classroom atmosphere.

Consider their speech pace – a rapid, energetic speech might reflect their enthusiasm and dynamic nature, while a slower, deliberate pace can be calming and give students time to absorb the information.

The use of humor, anecdotes, or storytelling can make their lessons more engaging and relatable.

A teacher’s voice and speech style not only influence how they are perceived but also how well students engage with the material.

  • Ms. Parker’s voice was always gentle and encouraging, making students feel at ease.
  • Mr. Johnson’s booming voice filled the classroom, capturing everyone’s attention.
  • Dr. Ahmed spoke slowly and clearly, ensuring every student understood the lesson.
  • Ms. Lee’s lectures were peppered with humorous anecdotes, making learning enjoyable.
  • Mr. Foster’s enthusiastic tone made even the most mundane topics interesting.
  • Dr. Simmons used storytelling effectively, turning complex concepts into engaging narratives.
  • Ms. Gomez’s articulate speech was both captivating and inspiring.
  • Mr. Thompson’s commanding tone left no room for disruptions.
  • Mrs. Clark often varied her pitch and pace, keeping students engaged and attentive.
  • Mr. Davis’s passionate speeches about literature often left students inspired and thoughtful.

If you want to describe a good or great teacher, watch this video:

30 Best Words to Describe a Teacher

Consider using these words to describe teachers in your stories:

  • Knowledgeable
  • Compassionate
  • Charismatic
  • Approachable
  • Authoritative
  • Enthusiastic
  • Encouraging
  • Inspirational
  • Disciplined

30 Best Phrases to Describe a Teacher

Here are phrases you can use to describe a teacher:

  • A beacon of knowledge
  • Commands the classroom with authority
  • Nurtures curiosity and creativity
  • A pillar of patience
  • Engages students with interactive lessons
  • Voice resonates with passion
  • Cultivates a love for learning
  • Approachable and always willing to listen
  • Has a knack for simplifying complex concepts
  • Infuses humor into lectures
  • Master of storytelling
  • A guiding light in students’ academic journey
  • A fountain of wisdom
  • Fosters a collaborative learning environment
  • Maintains high expectations for all students
  • A true mentor at heart
  • Embodies the spirit of lifelong learning
  • Has an infectious enthusiasm for the subject
  • Known for their meticulous attention to detail
  • Balances discipline with compassion
  • An innovator in educational strategies
  • Cultivates independent thinkers
  • A guardian of academic integrity
  • A reassuring presence in the classroom
  • Skilled in addressing diverse learning needs
  • A natural orator
  • Exemplifies professionalism and dedication
  • A champion for student success
  • Has a calming influence on students
  • A master at engaging reluctant learners

3 Full Writing Examples of How to Describe a Teacher

Here are examples of how to describe a teacher in writing in different kinds of stories.

In a Mystery

Ms. Hawthorne stood at the front of the dimly lit classroom, her piercing blue eyes scanning her students. She spoke in a slow, calculated manner, each word dripping with intention. Her presence was commanding, yet there was an air of mystery around her. She often paused mid-lecture, lost in thought, as if hiding a secret only she knew.

Professor Elarion, with his flowing robes and twinkling eyes, seemed to have stepped out of a tale of old. His voice, filled with wonder, spoke of ancient magic and realms beyond. In his class, the walls shimmered with enchantments, and every lesson was an adventure into the unknown.

Mr. Adams, with his charming smile and warm, inviting voice, had a way of making every student feel seen. His laughter filled the room, creating an atmosphere of ease and comfort. There was a gentle grace in his movements, and his eyes sparkled with genuine care and interest in his students’ lives.

Final Thoughts: How to Describe a Teacher in Writing

Capturing the essence of a teacher in writing is like painting a portrait with words.

Each stroke reveals a unique blend of characteristics that shape their identity and influence in the classroom.

Read This Next

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  • How To Describe A Cat In A Story (100+ Examples & Guide)
  • How To Describe A Crowded Place In Writing (21 Best Tips & Examples)
  • How To Describe A Portal In A Story (Ultimate Guide)

Home — Essay Samples — Life — Personal Goals — Why I Want to Be a Teacher

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Why I Want to Be a Teacher

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Published: Mar 18, 2021

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how to write essay about teacher

Why I Want to Be a Teacher Essay: Writing Guide [2024]

Some people know which profession to choose from childhood, while others decide much later in life. However, and whenever you come to it, you may have to elaborate on it in your personal statement or cover letter. This is widely known as “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” essay.

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The primary reasons to pursue this career are:

  • Raising new generations and changing the world for the better are your goals.
  • You have all the qualities and skills to become a teacher.
  • Duties, responsibilities, and creativity that the profession involves fascinate you.
  • Growing up, you had a fantastic teacher who became your role model.

If you’re having trouble coming up with arguments, you have come to the right place! Here, at Custom-Writing , we gathered all the essential tips to use in a “being a teacher” essays.

🎓 7 Reasons to Become a Teacher

🛑 7 reasons not to become a teacher.

  • 📜 Paper Types

✍️ “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” Essay

📑 “why i want to be a teacher” personal statement, 🖨️ 50 teacher essay topics, 🤔 why i want to be a teacher faq, 🔗 references.

Why do you want to be a teacher? Being one seems manageable if it’s your dream job. At the same time, it’s the hardest profession that wouldn’t fit everyone. Check the following reasons to become a teacher that you can use in your paper.

Also, the following points are entirely appropriate for children. If they have a task like a “When I grow up, I want to become a teacher because…” essay, they will find this section useful.

🌱 Raising New Generations

Do you think that future generations require different teaching? Do you have an idea of a new proper approach? Whatever you believe, make sure to write about it:

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  • Elaborate on the problem:

Would you like to see a more environmentally-conscious generation? Or do you find that kids lack concentration and the will to succeed? Explain why you consider children and teens need guidance.

To support your argument, give statistics and real-life examples of the problems modern children and teens have. Provide the leading causes and solutions for this issue in your “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” essay.

  • Talk about your reasoning:

How did you understand that the problem above exists? You have to write why you thought about it in the first place.

For example, siblings. Do you have a younger sibling? Or a nephew who often asks you to play with him or her? Then, in your “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” essay, you might mention that this child helped you choose a future career.

  • Explain why you:

What makes you think you might be a good teacher? Does the child enjoy spending time with you? Did you manage to teach the child something useful? Make sure to discuss this in your essay.

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So, are you ready to write about raising new generations? Check this essay sample below to ensure your success:

🎨 Creativity in Teaching

In this kind of essay, you would shift the focus from yourself to the teacher’s profession in general. You’ll elaborate on why you find this profession a great creative outlet.

Talk about creativity that you’ll bring to the classroom. Use this reasoning to explain why this profession is one of a kind and appropriate for you in particular. Do you think that you might use your creative abilities to become an excellent teacher?

To underline your points:

Share several ideas on how to educate children using innovative approaches. Kids are naturally compelling storytellers because of their sincerity and imagination. Maybe, you’ll find a way to use it.

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🔍 Qualities of a Good Teacher

All the educator’s responsibilities require communication and writing skills. They have to acquire accountability, patience, creativity, etc.

You may be wondering: how can this topic help me explain why I want to become a teacher? The essay should compare the qualities of a good teacher with your own. Thus, you’ll show how good you are for the position.

  • Do you believe that a good teacher should be kind? If positive, mention some example that proves your desire to help. For example, you might have volunteered at an animal shelter.
  • Do you argue that a good teacher should be knowledgeable? Tell your readers about your good grades in college.

Still, wondering about how to write a good paper on an educator’s qualities? Check the useful teacher essay sample, written by a student:

🏫 Duties and Responsibilities

While this topic may sound similar to the previous ones, it’s all about how you present your arguments and structure your narrative. This topic offers you an opportunity to examine the day-to-day lives of teachers.

First of all , you can describe the duties and responsibilities of a teacher. Explore it, be it grading assignments, cooperating and communicating with parents, or continuously learning.

Secondly , you can focus on the aspects of teaching that you find rewarding. You can add in your essay writing the sadness that a teacher feels when his or her students graduate. Or talk about the joy they experience when they see students learning and improving their grades.

Whichever approach you choose, make sure it’s beneficial for you and reveals your strong sides.

👩‍🏫 My Best Teacher

This type of essay is similar to the previous ones. Here, you also describe the characteristics of an excellent teacher. There is, however, one key difference:

Rather than describing some abstract figures, you would describe a real-life teacher. Talk about the person who served as a role model and inspired you to pursue this career.

The premise of this essay is excellent:

First , you show an understanding of what the job of a teacher encompasses. Second , you also demonstrate your appreciation for someone who made a difference in your life.

“My best teacher” topic is an excellent opportunity to pay tribute to your teacher or a trainer who has significantly influenced your life.

🦉 Changing the World

How many times have you heard that teachers change the world? It might sound quite trivial, but they do. Educators have a significant impact on the new generation’s development and their effect on society. Their influence expands to every sphere of our life, from business to community, from ecology to economics.

How teachers change the world.

Here are the four secrets of how teachers change the world:

  • Sharing. A good educator shares their knowledge with others: students and colleagues. They bring their ideas and concepts to conferences, write blogs, and hold school meetings. Everyone benefits from this sharing. An educator gets feedback while their audience learns something new and motivating. Yes, it takes a lot of effort to set aside time for this, especially when you have a tight schedule. But it’s worth it. Think, would learning theories have ever existed if teachers didn’t share them?
  • Caring. Educators not only care for their students, but in most cases, they actively participate in charity. Think about what impact it can have when students, parents, and teachers work together for something significant. It can be anything: from planting trees to fundraising for cancer. Such activities help students to gain valuable experience in helping others and saving our planet. In most cases, they will continue doing so even after graduation.
  • Networking. In daily lives, teachers overcome various challenges. The networking and learning from other’s experiences allow the educator to see alternative points of view, motivate others, and find out new approaches to teaching.
  • Reflection. Educators regularly analyze what works and what not at their lessons. Regular observations help them adjust the curriculum or change teaching methods. A critical approach to their work allows the educator to optimize and make their job more impactful.

Now you have all the arguments to consider in your essay about the teacher’s profession.

Teaching is not easy and not a profession you should choose unless ready to face all its challenges. And here’s the “shortlist” of them:

  • Low salary. Yes. Educators from all over the world don’t get paid enough. On average, teachers’ weekly wages are 19.6% lower than those of other professions. So if you are not ready to live, hardly able to make ends meet, being a school educator is not your number one career choice.
  • Teachers spend their salaries on students and school staff. Most teachers spend a part of their earnings on purchasing school tools and gear. In 2012-2013, K-12 educators spent 1.6 billion dollars on classroom supplies. That’s not fair. Are you ready to waste your hard-earned money this way? Moreover, you will have to transport all this stuff to class on your own.
  • Teachers have to deal with all disturbing trends. Des-pa-si-to. Does this song make you roll up your eyes? And what about the whole class with fidget spinners? How about that these things repeat day by day for a couple of months? Think if you can deal with your irritation and anger. If negative, consider another profession.
  • Teachers don’t have weekends and vacations. You may be wondering why. And here’s the answer: they write lesson plans, check countless essays and projects, etc. Yes, in most cases, you won’t have time for yourself and your hobby. And… even for your family.
  • Educators are at high risk of public embarrassment. This means you will have to control everything you post on social media, your behavior, and every word you say to anyone. It’s like living under the microscope. And it’s exhausting.
  • Students always try to escape studying, and some parents blame teachers for that. Have you ever missed an essay submission deadline because of procrastination? Even if the answer is “No,” your students will. And some of their parents will blame you. They can say that you did not adequately explain the lesson material, or you’re too prejudiced to their kids, or… whatever it would be, you’ll be wrong.
  • Students can be abusive. Even the best teacher faced abuse and bullying in class. Think, will you be able to deal with troubled youth and bad behavior day by day?

As you can see, teaching is a stressful, low-paying, and thankless job. There are many reasons not to become a teacher you can use in your paper and to think about when choosing a career. However, many people still decide to be teachers because it is much more than just a profession. They want this career path as the passion of their lives.

📜 Teacher Topic: Paper Types

You may say that it’s just a teacher topic essay, what are we talking about? There are plenty of other types of essays on teaching that your professor may also ask to write. Check our blog to learn more about their specifics.

Below, we will give you all the essentials on being a teacher paper:

🗺️ Application Essay

You will have to write this type of essay when applying for a job. This paper is a crucial part of your application. You have to prove to your future employer that you meet all the requirements of your future career.

At first sight, it’s similar to a CV or a cover letter. But the job application essay is an entirely different paper. And here are some of the features of these papers:

  • Life experience and hobbies. In your CV or resume, you state your hobbies, interests, and even the places you have visited. However, in the teacher application, you provide only relevant information about yourself that clearly shows that your experience makes you the best candidate for this position.
  • Personalization. You may not change your CV when applying to various companies (unless you want to tailor it to a particular employer and position). But your teacher application essay must be customized. Some employers will ask you to tell more about yourself while others require you to solve a specific issue in the application.
  • Your ambitions and enthusiasm. The CV doesn’t show your objectives or attitude to various teaching theories. Otherwise, your employer can ask you to write an essay that represents your professional goals.

🔔 Personal Statement

The personal statement is quite similar to the job application letter. You will write it when applying to a college, university, or for a job. The difference between personal statement and a job application essay is that the first one leaves more space for your creativity.

As in the teacher application essay, you will have to customize it according to the job requirements and express both your ambitions and personal features.

Some employers require you to submit a personal statement along with the CV and cover letter.

💭 Autobiography

You may be wondering why you may need to write an autobiography of a teacher. This essay will be useful for your future portfolio. For example, you can add it to a job search portfolio or “about me” section on social media.

Needless to say that social networking nowadays is an essential part of a job search or career change. So, make sure that your autobiography of becoming a teacher contains only positive details.

However, you have to remember that an autobiography on Facebook or LinkedIn (or wherever you decide to place it) should make your profile searchable .

Above, we’ve provided the pros and cons of being a teacher. We hope, by now, you have the answer to the “why I want to be a teacher” question.

So, another issue arises: how to write an essay? Below we will show you all the essentials on writing teacher topic essays with examples.

1. ✔️ Preparation

Proper preparation is key to an A+ paper. First, you should determine the topic and arguments you will use in your essay on teacher jobs.

The arguments depend on the paper type you have to write. For example, you should prepare merits and demerits, or choose points to use in the argumentative essay. Maybe, you should research for a literature review. Whatever it takes, don’t skip this stage!

2. ✔️ Outline

The next step is to outline your future paper. An outline is a mandatory part of any essay writing. It’s a plan that will let you structure your ideas and stick to the required word count.

Here’s an example of “Why I Want to Be a Teacher” college essay outline:

“Why I want to be a teacher” college essay outline.

In this 300-word “Why I Would Like to Be a Teacher of Political Science” essay, our experts organized the paper structure and put key ideas to explore in the paper. As you can see, after the introduction, they put the topic aspects to cover and left a part for sources analysis.

Make a list of your arguments and ensure that they are logically connected. Your professor can require you to write an outline with headings and subheadings as complete sentences or a series of words (phrases). So make sure you’ve carefully read the paper guidelines and understood them.

3. ✔️ Thesis Statement

After you’ve finished your outline, you can start essay writing. At this stage, you need to develop a good thesis statement.

The purpose of your thesis is to explain your position—the central idea of the essay. Tell your reader what you will write in the paper and explain the significance of the subject.

The thesis statement is usually 1-2 sentences long and concludes the introduction paragraph. You can sketch out your thesis and add some touches after the paper is completed to make sure it meets the essay content.

4. ✔️ Introduction

Next, start with an introduction. Here you will have to briefly show the understanding of the teaching profession and its peculiarities:

  • A teacher essay introduction opens your paper with a hook. This first sentence aims to grab your reader’s attention. You can start it with a quote or an interesting fact.
  • Then provide the context necessary for understanding the issue.
  • End with the thesis statement. Make it as clear and precise as possible.
  • If you have time and space, outline the evidence that you’ll use in the body paragraphs.
  • Try to avoid phrases like “In this essay, I…” or “In my essay, I’m going…”

Here’s how your introduction can look like:

Teacher essay introduction sample.

5. ✔️ Body Paragraphs

Now, it’s time to recall all the arguments and evidence you put in your outline. You will write them in your essay body paragraphs. Depending on the required word count and the number of evidence, the paper body typically contains at least three body paragraphs.

However, some papers can have two body paragraphs. You should know that each idea and point of view must be stated in a separate part. If you have three or five arguments, you have to write three or five paragraphs in your essay, respectively.

Here’s our sample:

Teacher essay body sample.

6. ✔️ Conclusion

And the last but not the least part of your essay is the conclusion. Here you have to summarize all the ideas presented in the body section and explain how they meet your thesis statement.

Don’t try to repeat the thesis word by word or provide any new ideas. Here’s an example of a conclusion for an “I Want to Become a Teacher” essay:

Teacher essay conclusion sample.

If you used any sources, don’t forget to include the reference list in your paper according to the required citation style .

The purpose of the personal statement is to tell the admissions officer or recruiter why you decided to become a teacher. You can be required to submit one along with your college, university, scholarship, or job application.

A teacher’s personal statement is a document where you can express your personality. Want to learn all the dos and don’ts of its writing?

Just keep reading!

📝 Personal Statement: Tips

A typical personal statement is up to 700 words or 4,000 characters long, including intro, body, and conclusion. To keep word count tracking, you can type it in Word or Google Documents. Now, let’s consider critical points of personal statement writing that you can use for college/uni and job application:

  • Intro. Your introductory paragraph is an excellent opportunity to open the statement with memorable sentences about why you chose to become a teacher. Make it bright and clear.
  • Structure. As we mentioned above, each of your points should have supporting evidence. For example, if you’re writing about your experience, explain what you have learned and how this will help you in your future career.
  • Conclusion. The secret of good personal statement endings is to keep it simple and clear. Explain why you would be a perfect asset to this company or college and make a statement on why they would be lucky to have you as an employee or a student.
  • Personal statement for primary teaching. In case you’re going to apply for a teaching role or major, you should mention skills that will be useful for extracurricular school activities. You need to prove that you will be able to help with school plays or organize various off-class events.
  • Postgraduate personal statement. Here, you have to show your abilities and academic interests. Persuade the admission officers how you will benefit from studying the program and your impact on science.

The next point to consider is what to write in the body section of your “Why Do You Want to Be a Teacher” personal statement. Here are some questions to answer in your paper:

  • Why do you want to become a teacher?
  • Why did you decide to teach at this level?
  • What are your strengths?
  • Do you have teaching experience?
  • What personal skills do you have?
  • Why do you think you deserve a place in this company/university above others?
  • What is your background?
  • What are your career goals?

🙅‍♀️ Personal Statement: Common mistakes

A personal statement may be the only way to make a first impression on your recruiter or admissions officer. There might be no other opportunity. That’s why you must know the most common mistakes to avoid:

  • Negative tone. Believe us: no one wants to read the pessimistic, weak, or adverse essay. Even if you have to describe an uncomfortable fact, try to make it positive.
  • Using online templates. If you found a great personal statement template that you think will perfectly fit your paper, stop! Recruiters and college admissions have seen dozens and dozens of them, so there are high chances that your application will be declined. Spend a little more time and write a statement yourself.
  • Including irrelevant facts or lies. Recruiters spend, on average, six seconds on reading the CV and a personal statement. That’s why you should neither tell a cool story about your grandmother’s birthday nor tell lies. In the first case, it’s annoying. Moreover, it may lead to firing or dismissal from the college.
  • Using clichés, jargon, overused words, etc. A personal statement requires a formal tone, so conversational tone is merely unacceptable.
  • Using the same personal statement for different applications. Even if you send your application to ten different companies or colleges, personalize it! Include some facts from the firm’s or university’s history, mission, or vision, and explain how your skills meet them.
  • Leaving writing the statement to the last minute. It takes some time to prepare, draft, and polish your paper to make it stand out from other applications.

10 Cliches to avoid.

If you still need a “Why Do You Want to Be a Teacher?” personal statement example, check the sample below:

In case you want something more than “why did you decide to become a teacher,” check the topics below. We believe that your teacher will appreciate reading your paper.

  • A recess for primary school students. Imagine if you were a school principal. Would you sacrifice breaks in favor of additional study time? Explain your point of view.
  • Homework : yay or nay? Think about how much time students should spend on their homework in elementary school. Should there be any homework at all? Provide your points and evidence and show how they are connected to your teaching philosophy.
  • Technologies in education : pros and cons. Examine the advantages and disadvantages of using desktops and tablets at school and for homework.
  • Handwriting in elementary school . Some schools stopped teaching students cursive handwriting. Provide your point of view on whether handwriting is a lost art or an unnecessary relic.
  • School uniform and dress code. Should students wear a uniform? And what about the teachers?
  • Standardized tests in school. Are these tests discriminatory? Should they be tied to funding? Elaborate on whether they cause too much anxiety for students.
  • Second language learning : advantages and disadvantages. How many languages should an average school graduate know? Do pupils need to learn any second language at school?
  • Armed security in educational institutions. More and more school mass shootings are reported every year. Can armed guards protect students? Do your research on gun control and demonstrate your opinion.
  • Early start times at school . Explore how such start times impact on students’ perception of the lesson material.
  • Inclusive education for children with disabilities . Research the techniques that will fit your students with special needs. Show the connection between them and your teaching approach.
  • Personal philosophy of education and views on teacher’s career .
  • Discuss how teachers can influence students’ personal life .
  • Analyze the social and emotional competencies teachers should possess.
  • Describe the difficulties a teacher may face when working with children.
  • Personal development plan of a teacher .
  • Who is responsible for children’s low academic achievement.
  • Explain why you want to be physical education teacher .
  • Discuss pros and cons of distance education and traditional degree .
  • Describe an ideal public school .
  • Remembering who you were: my teacher .
  • What educational system would you prefer if you were a teacher?
  • Analyze the difficulties a teacher may face trying to implement multicultural educational practices .
  • Compare the efficiency of private and public schools .
  • Road to becoming a good teacher .
  • Why constant professional development is crucial for teachers.
  • Describe an educational style a teacher can use when teaching English as a second language .
  • Is music useful or harmful for student academic performance?
  • Methods teachers can use to improve the school for young learners.
  • Examine the effect a teacher has on student’s personality .
  • Discuss the specifics of teaching music in middle schools .
  • Analyze the crucial meaning of effective student-teacher interaction in inclusive education .
  • Explain the teacher’s role in integration of children with special needs .
  • Reading problems and ways of helping students with reading disabilities .
  • Describe the strategies a teacher can use to improve student learning .
  • What can a teacher do to help students in developing social and emotional skills ?
  • Examine the value of education in student life .
  • Why e-learning is an important part of contemporary education.
  • Teacher’s influence on student’s career choice .
  • Discuss the role teacher plays in students’ moral development .
  • What can a teacher do to avoid workplace burnout .
  • Compare and analyze the role of teachers and parents in students’ math performance .
  • Career goal of a maths teacher.
  • Should the government allow armed teachers on campus for students’ safety?
  • Examine the most important classroom management areas for a new teacher .
  • Why are laptops and iPads so important for students?
  • Analyze how book clubs for teachers can stimulate professional development.
  • Is it right to expel bullies from school ?
  • Motivation to choose a teacher’s profession .
  • Explain why teachers’ attitude is important for educational system success.
  • Why is low teacher retention a real problem and what can be done about that?

Want more tips and advice on resume writing? Check this article on how to make a resume written by our experts!

Good luck with your essay about being a teacher! Share the article with those who may need it.

Learn more on this topic:

  • Scholarship Essay Examples about Yourself
  • How to Write a Scholarship Essay about Why You Deserve It
  • Financial Assistance Essay: Useful Tips to Make It Rock
  • How to Write an Essay Describing Your Financial Need
  • Why i Want to be a Pharmacist Essay: Step-by-step Guide
  • College Application Essay Writing Mistakes to Avoid
  • How to Write a 250 Words College Personal Statement

Becoming a good professional has never been easy. Getting employed as a teacher is not the most difficult part of the process. Acquiring professionalism (e.g., building “soft skills,” psychological competence, broad knowledge base) takes more time and effort.

Formalities of the employment process might not coincide in Canada, US, UK, and any other location. The overall algorithm is as follows:

Choose an educational level and/or a subject to focus on. Study the requirements for the desired role and opportunities to meet them.

Start developing the competencies you are lacking.

Try to recollect how you first thought you would wanna become a teacher

Compose a list of the benefits of this rewarding occupation.

Organize the selected ideas to create a body of the essay. Write an appropriate introduction and conclusion.

Recollect what you dreamed about in your childhood.

Compare it with what you want to be in the future as of today.

Think about the reasons for your choice.

Present the comparison and why your choice looks like this in the essay body.

Write an appropriate introduction and conclusion.

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  • Review Essay: Reflections on Scholarship and Teaching in the Humanities
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Nice And informative article

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Glad you liked it, Thomas! Thanks for the feedback!

Thanks all of this was so helpful, could you send me more on being a teacher to my email [email protected]

Unfortunately, we don’t have more articles on teaching for the time being, but you can check the blog later in case we post something useful for you.

Nice and informative

Glad you liked the article, Muhammad!

This article is really very informative and full of great ideas.

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I am happy to see new creative writing and wonderful thoughts.

Thank you for your kind words, Riona!

These are super cool guidelines to help me with my essay. Fresh ideas started popping right up. Thnx a whole bunch!

Happy that you enjoyed the post. Thanks, Mario!:)

You have really done a good job. More grace to you.

Thank you, Katey 🙂

What My Professors Never Told Me About Teaching

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When I was in graduate school studying to teach English/language arts, my professors taught me about the value of student choice and the profound impact of a worthwhile text in the hands of a hungry learner. They taught me about classroom setup and assessments and the power of ceaseless positivity. Valuable lessons, of course, but weightless compared with the real challenges of teaching.

A decade in, here is what I wish they had taught me:

Your work is necessary—but it is work.

You will not be properly thanked, through money or otherwise. You did not go into it for thanks and you will not get thanks out of it.

Opinion illustration of teachers and students, about job perceptions.

You will sometimes forget that you are working, when a lesson is engaging and you have kids who are really interested in their learning, but mostly you will cram the grueling labor of mind growing into inedible chunks, force feeding, and begging for something— anything —to take.

You will question the necessity of the work, especially when nearly everyone believes they could do the job better than you can, and what’s more, that you should do it for less money and more hours because the love alone should be enough to sustain you.

While the work is necessary, it does not necessarily have to be yours. Only you will know when the work, for you, has ended. It is OK to let it go.

You will rely on your routine.

Alarm. Snooze. Alarm. Snooze. Alarm. Rise. You will park in the same spot and you will become irrationally irritated when a new car parks over the line. You will appreciate the breaks—you will need them. You will learn to schedule your restroom breaks by a bell and you will learn to eat breakfast and lunch at unholy hours.

You will know the waxing and waning moon by the moods of your students. You will come to dread the day before Thanksgiving and the week before Christmas, though of course, you will need the time to recover. You will limp your way through spring to summer break—which you will adamantly inform the uniformed public is not paid vacation but deferred-pay vacation. You need this summer break to soak up sun and energy for another year.

You will feel lonely and insignificant.

Most of your time will be spent in cinder block cells, in markedly prisonlike edifices. Sometimes, the teachers in your same content area and grade will be called your ‘team,” but, ultimately, you are a team of one. You will see yourself lined up as a series of statistics next to the names of students you have only barely begun to know and you will be asked to account for those numbers. You will doubt yourself and you will wonder if you have made a mistake.

Decisions will be made about you and for you. You will realize you are mostly a customer service representative. You will have books plucked from your hands with spines unbent, words unseen. Everyone who only has a passing knowledge of your school will have an opinion on what should happen inside.

You will be called into meetings over and again asking you to remember your purpose and to love away the pain of your chosen career. If you are ever angry, you will be asked to reevaluate your values.

You will find solace in your colleagues.

Without them, you will not survive. You will laugh at yourself as you lament the good old days with the people on your same journey. You will not like all of them. You will find yourself envious of those who love and are loved, of those who leave work at work and don’t think about it until the next school day, of those who are seen. You will despise yourself for this envy, which you will understand is the thief of joy.

But you will also have your work to thank for introducing you to your best friends—you will never have found them otherwise. And you will need to find them. You will need to find joy, because time is finite, and all of your joy cannot be reserved for after hours and weekends.

You will find this joy in the people beside you. They will be your lifeline and, though this work will always feel impossible, they will make it a little more possible.

You will be sowing seeds in the dark.

You will spend about 108 hours with each new student. Of these 108 hours, your time will be divided across a number of tasks: taking attendance, conducting safety drills, monitoring assemblies, escorting students to various locations, mediating their disputes, redirecting their outbursts, and, occasionally, teaching. Interspersed in the bursts of teaching the content, you will learn about your students’ lives and wonder who they will become after you.

Conceptual Illustration

You will laugh with them or when they are not looking (if you are the stoic and serious type), cry with them, grieve with them.

You will experience great joy and, sometimes, immense anger with them. You are human, and, as you will quickly learn, this is the most human of all the professions.

Occasionally, you will hear from them years later, but mostly you will not see the effects of whatever you have—or haven’t—done.

You are more powerful than you think.

You are. People will tell you that you are not. Parents will tell you that you are not. Legislators and other politicians, superintendents and principals, and even other teachers will devalue you. You will learn to let them. You will see the evidence of your worth and you remember what they do not: When COVID closes the classrooms, they will not be able to continue their lives without you. They will need you more than you ever need them.

You will be encouraged to forget this in favor of “remembering your why.” Instead, remember your power.

You know you will not see the fruits of your labor, but you know your labor will bear fruit. You have not toiled to see the earth you have tended go barren. You will develop an infinite capacity for hope. When all else fails (and it will all fail again and again), this hope must sustain you.

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  • How to Teach Essay Writing

Don't just throw your homeschooled-student intoformal essay crafting. Focus on sentence structure and basic paragraph composition before movingto more complicated formal essay composition.

Are you a competent essay writer? Even if you know how to write an essay , chances are you are dreading the coming years of teaching homeschool writing just as much as your novice writer could be dreading learning how to write . Writing comes naturally for very few, but most view writing as an insurmountable abstract mountain. The Write Foundation writing curriculum is a divide and conquer method of teaching writing. Focusing on small portions of writing paragraphs and later five-paragraph college level essays, eventually you and your students will be able to use all the necessary writing skills to easily compose wonderfully crafted formal essays .

Start with a good foundation

That is, of course, what The Write Foundation teaches. Don’t just throw your homeschooled-child into the middle of essay crafting. Focus on sentence structure and basic paragraph composition before moving to more complicated formal essay composition . Learn to write essays one bite at a time. This helps students develop writing skills by using writing tools which helps them gain confidence and enables parents who are insecure about their own writing skills learn with their students.

Hold their hand as much as they need you hold their hand.

An abstract assignment with limited instructions can appear quite daunting to a reluctant, struggling, or new writer; tiny decisions can become writing blocks in a new writer’s mind.

Share the experience with your homeschooler. Discuss writing blocks and ways to overcome them. Discuss the planning process and experience how it helps flesh out an essay. Walk them through each lesson making sure they complete each step successfully before attempting to move on in the writing process. Working side by side with your student also helps you become a better instructor by solidifying the lesson for yourself. As students gain confidence with their new skills they will need your help less and less so they will shoo you away as they learn writing is much easier using the complete writing process.

Use concrete assignments

Creative writing is very subjective, and it is also very abstract for a new writer. You need a writing curriculum which focuses on concrete assignments and provides a variety of writing topics that fit the type of writing being taught in that assignment. Give your students a structure to work into a paragraph using their creative information. Leaving several factors to the unknown, such as type of writing, structure, and so on, leaves more decisions that the novice writer is not ready to determine. An abstract assignment with limited instructions can appear quite daunting to a reluctant, struggling, or just new writer; tiny decisions can become writing blocks in a new writer’s mind. Even experienced writers face writer’s block. Students need to be given tools and taught skills that overcome “But, what do I write about?”

Know your audience

Let your child select from a list of possible writing topics that may be interesting to them. Your child may enjoy the experience more if he is writing about his favorite pastime instead of writing about your favorite pastime. Choosing topics about things that directly influence your child, such as different views about their favorite sport, the influence of network TV or political topics that hit close to home may open the doors for lively discussion and insight into your child’s mind.

Writing is a necessary life skill. When teaching writing remember you are not alone. If you are worried about teaching formal writing to your homeschooler, use the support system of The Write Foundation for any questions you may have through the process, and know that you are not alone. Look into a homeschool writing co-op in your area to lighten the burden and give new perspective on your child’s essay writing development. Use The Write Foundation and use a proven writing system.

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What’s it like to be a teacher in america today, public k-12 teachers are stressed about their jobs and few are optimistic about the future of education; many say poverty, absenteeism and mental health are major problems at their school.

A teacher leads an English class at a high school in Richmond, Virginia. (Parker Michels-Boyce/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Pew Research Center conducted this study to better understand the views and experiences of public K-12 school teachers. The analysis in this report is based on an online survey of 2,531 U.S. public K-12 teachers conducted from Oct. 17 to Nov. 14, 2023. The teachers surveyed are members of RAND’s American Teacher Panel, a nationally representative panel of public K-12 school teachers recruited through MDR Education. Survey data is weighted to state and national teacher characteristics to account for differences in sampling and response to ensure they are representative of the target population.

Here are the questions used for this report , along with responses, and the survey methodology .

Low-poverty , medium-poverty and high-poverty schools are based on the percentage of students eligible for free and reduced-price lunch, as reported by the National Center for Education Statistics (less than 40%, 40%-59% and 60% or more, respectively).

Secondary schools include both middle schools and high schools.

All references to party affiliation include those who lean toward that party. Republicans include those who identify as Republicans and those who say they lean toward the Republican Party. Democrats include those who identify as Democrats and those who say they lean toward the Democratic Party.

Public K-12 schools in the United States face a host of challenges these days – from teacher shortages to the lingering effects of COVID-19 learning loss to political battles over curriculum .

A horizontal stacked bar chart showing that teachers are less satisfied with their jobs than U.S. workers overall.

In the midst of all this, teachers express low levels of satisfaction with their jobs. In fact, they’re much less satisfied than U.S. workers overall.

Here’s how public K-12 teachers are feeling about their jobs:

  • 77% say their job is frequently stressful.
  • 68% say it’s overwhelming.
  • 70% say their school is understaffed.
  • 52% say they would not advise a young person starting out today to become a teacher.

When it comes to how their students are doing in school, teachers are relatively downbeat about both academic performance and behavior.

Here’s how public K-12 teachers rate academic performance and behavior at their school:

A horizontal stacked bar chart showing that about half of teachers give students at their school low marks for academic performance and behavior.

  • 48% say the academic performance of most students at their school is fair or poor. A third say it’s good, and only 17% describe it as excellent or very good.
  • 49% say the behavior of most students at their school is fair or poor; 35% say it’s good and 13% say it’s excellent or very good.

The COVID-19 pandemic likely compounded these issues. About eight-in-ten teachers (among those who have been teaching for at least a year) say the lasting impact of the pandemic on students’ behavior, academic performance and emotional well-being has been very or somewhat negative.

Assessments of student performance and behavior differ widely by school poverty level. 1 Teachers in high-poverty schools have a much more negative outlook. But feelings of stress and dissatisfaction among teachers are fairly universal, regardless of where they teach.

Related: What Public K-12 Teachers Want Americans To Know About Teaching

A bar chart showing that most teachers see parents’ involvement as insufficient.

As they navigate these challenges, teachers don’t feel they’re getting the support or reinforcement they need from parents.

Majorities of teachers say parents are doing too little when it comes to holding their children accountable if they misbehave in school, helping them with their schoolwork and ensuring their attendance.

Teachers in high- and medium-poverty schools are more likely than those in low-poverty schools to say parents are doing too little in each of these areas.

These findings are based on a survey of 2,531 U.S. public K-12 teachers conducted Oct. 17-Nov. 14, 2023, using the RAND American Teacher Panel. 2 The survey looks at the following aspects of teachers’ experiences:

  • Teachers’ job satisfaction (Chapter 1)
  • How teachers manage their workload (Chapter 2)
  • Problems students are facing at public K-12 schools (Chapter 3)
  • Challenges in the classroom (Chapter 4)
  • Teachers’ views of parent involvement (Chapter 5)
  • Teachers’ views on the state of public K-12 education (Chapter 6)

Problems students are facing

A horizontal stacked bar chart showing that poverty, chronic absenteeism and mental health stand out as major problems at public K-12 schools.

We asked teachers about some of the challenges students at their school are facing. Three problems topped the list:

  • Poverty (53% say this is a major problem among students who attend their school)
  • Chronic absenteeism (49%)
  • Anxiety and depression (48%)

Chronic absenteeism (that is, students missing a substantial number of school days) is a particular challenge at high schools, with 61% of high school teachers saying this is a major problem where they teach. By comparison, 46% of middle school teachers and 43% of elementary school teachers say the same.

Anxiety and depression are viewed as a more serious problem at the secondary school level: 69% of high school teachers and 57% of middle school teachers say this is a major problem among their students, compared with 29% of elementary school teachers.

Fewer teachers (20%) view bullying as a major problem at their school, though the share is significantly higher among middle school teachers (34%).

A look inside the classroom

We also asked teachers how things are going in their classroom and specifically about some of the issues that may get in the way of teaching.

  • 47% of teachers say students showing little or no interest in learning is a major problem in their classroom. The share rises to 58% among high school teachers.
  • 33% say students being distracted by their cellphones is a major problem. This is particularly an issue for high school teachers, with 72% saying this is a major problem.
  • About one-in-five teachers say students getting up and walking around when they’re not supposed to and being disrespectful toward them (21% each) are major problems. Teachers in elementary and middle schools are more likely than those in high schools to see these as challenges.

A majority of teachers (68%) say they’ve experienced verbal abuse from a student – such as being yelled at or threatened. Some 21% say this happens at least a few times a month.

Physical violence is less common. Even so, 40% of teachers say a student has been violent toward them , with 9% saying this happens at least a few times a month.

About two-thirds of teachers (66%) say that the current discipline practices at their school are very or somewhat mild. Only 2% say the discipline practices at their school are very or somewhat harsh, while 31% say they are neither harsh nor mild. Most teachers (67%) say teachers themselves don’t have enough influence in determining discipline practices at their school.

Behavioral issues and mental health challenges

A bar chart showing that two-thirds of teachers in high-poverty schools say they have to address students’ behavioral issues daily.

In addition to their teaching duties, a majority of teachers (58%) say they have to address behavioral issues in their classroom every day. About three-in-ten teachers (28%) say they have to help students with mental health challenges daily.

In each of these areas, elementary and middle school teachers are more likely than those at the high school level to say they do these things on a daily basis.

And teachers in high-poverty schools are more likely than those in medium- and low-poverty schools to say they deal with these issues each day.

Cellphone policies and enforcement

A diverging bar chart showing that most high school teachers say cellphone policies are hard to enforce.

Most teachers (82%) say their school or district has policies regarding cellphone use in the classroom.

Of those, 56% say these policies are at least somewhat easy to enforce, 30% say they’re difficult to enforce, and 14% say they’re neither easy nor difficult to enforce.

Experiences with cellphone policies vary widely across school levels. High school teachers (60%) are much more likely than middle school (30%) and elementary school teachers (12%) to say the policies are difficult to enforce (among those who say their school or district has a cellphone policy).

How teachers are experiencing their jobs

Thinking about the various aspects of their jobs, teachers are most satisfied with their relationship with other teachers at their school (71% are extremely or very satisfied).

They’re least satisfied with how much they’re paid – only 15% are extremely or very satisfied with their pay, while 51% are not too or not at all satisfied.

Among teachers who don’t plan to retire or stop working this year, 29% say it’s at least somewhat likely they will look for a new job in the 2023-24 school year. Within that group, 40% say they would look for a job outside of education, 29% say they’d seek a non-teaching job in education, and only 18% say they’d look for a teaching job at another public K-12 school.

Do teachers find their work fulfilling and enjoyable?

Overall, 56% of teachers say they find their job to be fulfilling extremely often or often; 53% say their job is enjoyable. These are significantly lower than the shares who say their job is frequently stressful (77%) or overwhelming (68%).

Positive experiences are more common among newer teachers. Two-thirds of those who’ve been teaching less than six years say their work is fulfilling extremely often or often, and 62% of this group says their work is frequently enjoyable.

Teachers with longer tenures are somewhat less likely to feel this way. For example, 48% of those who’ve been teaching for six to 10 years say their work is frequently enjoyable.

Balancing the workload

Most teachers (84%) say there’s not enough time during their regular work hours to do tasks like grading, lesson planning, paperwork and answering work emails.

Among those who feel this way, 81% say simply having too much work is a major reason.

Many also point to having to spend time helping students outside the classroom, performing non-teaching duties like lunch duty, and covering other teachers’ classrooms as at least minor reasons they don’t have enough time to get all their work done.

A diverging bar chart showing that a majority of teachers say it’s difficult for them to achieve work-life balance.

A majority of teachers (54%) say it’s very or somewhat difficult for them to balance work and their personal life. About one-in-four (26%) say it’s very or somewhat easy for them to balance these things, and 20% say it’s neither easy nor difficult.

Among teachers, women are more likely than men to say work-life balance is difficult for them (57% vs. 43%). Women teachers are also more likely to say they often find their job stressful or overwhelming.

How teachers view the education system

A large majority of teachers (82%) say the overall state of public K-12 education has gotten worse in the past five years.

Pie charts showing that most teachers say public K-12 education has gotten worse over the past 5 years.

And very few are optimistic about the next five years: Only 20% of teachers say public K-12 education will be a lot or somewhat better five years from now. A narrow majority (53%) say it will be worse.

Among teachers who think things have gotten worse in recent years, majorities say the current political climate (60%) and the lasting effects of the COVID-19 pandemic (57%) are major reasons. A sizable share (46%) also point to changes in the availability of funding and resources.

Related:  About half of Americans say public K-12 education is going in the wrong direction

Which political party do teachers trust more to deal with educational challenges?

On balance, more teachers say they trust the Democratic Party than say they trust the Republican Party to do a better job handling key issues facing the K-12 education system. But three-in-ten or more across the following issues say they don’t trust either party:

  • Shaping school curriculum (42% say they trust neither party)
  • Ensuring teachers have adequate pay and benefits (35%)
  • Making schools safer (35%)
  • Ensuring adequate funding for schools (33%)
  • Ensuring all students have equal access to high-quality K-12 education (31%)

A majority of public K-12 teachers (58%) identify or lean toward the Democratic Party. This is higher than the share among the general public (47%).

  • Poverty levels are based on the percentage of students in the school who are eligible for free and reduced-price lunch. ↩
  • For details, refer to the Methodology section of the report. ↩
  • Urban, suburban and rural schools are based on the location of the school as reported by the National Center for Education Statistics (rural includes town). Definitions match those used by the U.S. Census Bureau. ↩

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Table of contents, ‘back to school’ means anytime from late july to after labor day, depending on where in the u.s. you live, among many u.s. children, reading for fun has become less common, federal data shows, most european students learn english in school, for u.s. teens today, summer means more schooling and less leisure time than in the past, about one-in-six u.s. teachers work second jobs – and not just in the summer, most popular.

About Pew Research Center Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping the world. It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical social science research. Pew Research Center does not take policy positions. It is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts .

how to write essay about teacher

Teachers are using AI to grade essays. But some experts are raising ethical concerns

W hen Diane Gayeski, a professor of strategic communications at Ithaca College, receives an essay from one of her students, she runs part of it through ChatGPT, asking the AI tool to critique and suggest how to improve the work.

“The best way to look at AI for grading is as a teaching assistant or research assistant who might do a first pass … and it does a pretty good job at that,” she told CNN.

She shows her students the feedback from ChatGPT and how the tool rewrote their essay. “I’ll share what I think about their intro, too, and we’ll talk about it,” she said.

Gayeski requires her class of 15 students to do the same: run their draft through ChatGPT to see where they can make improvements.

The emergence of AI is reshaping education, presenting real benefits, such as automating some tasks to free up time for more personalized instruction, but also some big hazards, from issues around accuracy and plagiarism to maintaining integrity.

Both teachers and students are using the new technology. A report by strategy consultant firm Tyton Partners, sponsored by plagiarism detection platform Turnitin, found half of college students used AI tools in Fall 2023. Meanwhile, while fewer faculty members used AI, the percentage grew to 22% of faculty members in the fall of 2023, up from 9% in spring 2023.

Teachers are turning to AI tools and platforms — such as ChatGPT, Writable, Grammarly and EssayGrader — to assist with grading papers, writing feedback, developing lesson plans and creating assignments. They’re also using the burgeoning tools to create quizzes, polls, videos and interactives to up the ante” for what’s expected in the classroom.

Students, on the other hand, are leaning on tools such as ChatGPT and Microsoft CoPilot — which is built into Word, PowerPoint and other products.

But while some schools have formed policies on how students can or can’t use AI for schoolwork, many do not have guidelines for teachers. The practice of using AI for writing feedback or grading assignments also raises ethical considerations. And parents and students who are already spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on tuition may wonder if an endless feedback loop of AI-generated and AI-graded content in college is worth the time and money.

“If teachers use it solely to grade, and the students are using it solely to produce a final product, it’s not going to work,” said Gayeski.

The time and place for AI

How teachers use AI depends on many factors, particularly when it comes to grading, according to Dorothy Leidner, a professor of business ethics at the University of Virginia. If the material being tested in a large class is largely declarative knowledge — so there is a clear right and wrong — then a teacher grading using the AI “might be even superior to human grading,” she told CNN.

AI would allow teachers to grade papers faster and more consistently and avoid fatigue or boredoms, she said.

But Leidner noted when it comes to smaller classes or assignments with less definitive answers, grading should remain personalized so teachers can provide more specific feedback and get to know a student’s work, and, therefore, progress over time.

“A teacher should be responsible for grading but can give some responsibility to the AI,” she said.

She suggested teachers use AI to look at certain metrics — such as structure, language use and grammar — and give a numerical score on those figures. But teachers should then grade students’ work themselves when looking for novelty, creativity and depth of insight.

Leslie Layne, who has been teaching ChatGPT best practices in her writing workshop at the University of Lynchburg in Virginia, said she sees the advantages for teachers but also sees drawbacks.

“Using feedback that is not truly from me seems like it is shortchanging that relationship a little,” she said.

She also sees uploading a student’s work to ChatGPT as a “huge ethical consideration” and potentially a breach of their intellectual property. AI tools like ChatGPT use such entries to train their algorithms on everything from patterns of speech to how to make sentences to facts and figures.

Ethics professor Leidner agreed, saying this should particularly be avoided for doctoral dissertations and master’s theses because the student might hope to publish the work.

“It would not be right to upload the material into the AI without making the students aware of this in advance,” she said. “And maybe students should need to provide consent.”

Some teachers are leaning on software called Writable that uses ChatGPT to help grade papers but is “tokenized,” so essays do not include any personal information, and it’s not shared directly with the system.

Teachers upload essays to the platform, which was recently acquired by education company Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, which then provides suggested feedback for students.

Other educators are using platforms such as  Turnitin  that boast plagiarism detection tools to help teachers identify when assignments are written by ChatGPT and other AI. But these types of detection tools are far from foolproof; OpenAI shut down its own AI-detection tool last year due to what the company called a “low rate of accuracy.”

Setting standards

Some schools are actively working on policies for both teachers and students. Alan Reid, a research associate in the Center for Research and Reform in Education (CRRE) at Johns Hopkins University, said he recently spent time working with K-12 educators who use GPT tools to create end-of-quarter personalized comments on report cards.

But like Layne, he acknowledged the technology’s ability to write insightful feedback remains “limited.”

He currently sits on a committee at his college that’s authoring an AI policy for faculty and staff; discussions are ongoing, not just for how teachers use AI in the classroom but how it’s used by educators in general.

He acknowledges schools are having conversations about using generative AI tools to create things like promotion and tenure files, performance reviews, and job postings.”

Nicolas Frank, an associate professor of philosophy at University of Lynchburg, said universities and professors need to be on the same page when it comes to policies but need to stay cautious .

“There is a lot of danger in making policies about AI at this stage,” he said.

He worries it’s still too early to understand how AI will be integrated into everyday life. He is also concerned that some administrators who don’t teach in classrooms may craft policy that misses nuances of instruction.

“That may create a danger of oversimplifying the problems with AI use in grading and instruction,” he said. “Oversimplification is how bad policy is made.”

To start, he said educators can identify clear abuses of AI and begin policy-making around those.

Leidner, meanwhile, said universities can be very high level with their guidance, such as making transparency a priority — so students have a right to know when AI is being used to grade their work — and identifying what types of information should never be uploaded into an AI or asked of an AI.

But she said universities must also be open to “regularly reevaluating as the technology and uses evolve.”

For more CNN news and newsletters create an account at CNN.com

Leslie Layne teaches her students how to best use ChatGPT but takes issue with how some educators are using it to grade papers. - Courtesy Leslie Layne

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