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III. Rhetorical Situation

3.14 Writing a Visual Analysis

Terri Pantuso

While visuals such as graphs and charts can enhance an argument when used to present evidence, visuals themselves can also present an argument. Every time you encounter an ad for a certain product, stop and consider what exactly the creators of that visual want you to believe. Who is the target audience? Does the message resonate more with one group of people than another? While most advertisements or political cartoons seem to be nebulous conveyors of commerce, if you look closely you will uncover an argument presented to you, the audience.

So how do you write a visual rhetorical analysis essay? First, you’ll want to begin by examining the rhetorical strengths and weaknesses of your chosen visual. If your purpose is to write an argument about the visual, such as what artworks are considered “fine art,” then your focus will be on demonstrating how the visual meets the criteria you establish in your thesis . To do this, try a method adapted from one on working with primary sources where you Observe, Reflect and Question. [1]

Arguments About a Visual

Take for example Vincent Van Gogh’s “The Starry Night” (Figure 3.14.1). [2] If you want to argue that the painting is a classic example of fine art, you’ll first have to define the criteria for your terms “classic” and “fine art.” Next, you’ll want to look for elements within the painting to support your claim. As you study the painting, try the following strategy for analysis: Describe/Observe ; Respond/Reflect ; Analyze/Question .

This is an image of Van Gogh's Starry Night.

Describe/Observe

First, describe what you see in the visual quite literally. Begin by focusing on colors, shading, shapes, and font if you’re analyzing an advertisement. In the case of “The Starry Night,” you might begin by describing the various shades of blue, the black figures that resemble buildings, or shades of yellow that cast light. As you describe them, observe the texture, shape, contour, etc. about each element. For this initial stage, you are simply describing what you observe. Do not look deeper at this point.

Respond/Reflect

Next, respond to the ways in which the things you described have impacted you as a viewer. What emotions are evoked from the various shadings and colors used in the ad or painting? If there are words present, what does the artist’s font selection do for the image? This is where you’ll want to look for appeals to ethos and pathos. In the case of “The Starry Night,” how does the use of black create depth and for what reason? Reflect on how the intermittent use of shades of blue impacts the overall impression of the painting. At this stage, you are questioning the elements used so that you may move to the final stage of analysis.

Analyze/Question

After you’ve described and reflected upon the various elements of the visual, question what you have noted and decide if there is an argument presented by the visual. This assessment should be made based upon what you’ve observed and reflected upon in terms of the content of the image alone. Ask yourself if the arrangement of each item in the visual impacts the message? Could there be something more the artist wants you to gather from this visual besides the obvious? Question the criteria you established in your thesis and introduction to see if it holds up throughout your analysis. Now you are ready to begin writing a visual rhetorical analysis of your selected image.

Arguments Presented By/Within a Visual

In the summer of 2015, the Bureau of Land Management ran an ad campaign with the #mypubliclandsroadtrip tag. The goal of this campaign was to “explore the diverse landscapes and resources on [our] public lands, from the best camping sites to cool rock formations to ghost towns.” [3] The photo below (Figure 3.14.2) [4] is of the King Range National Conservation Area (NCA) in California which was the first NCA designated by Congress in 1970. [5] Returning to the Observe, Reflect and Question method, analysis of this photo might focus on what the image presents overall as well as arguments embedded within the image.

This image is a perspective looking down on the beach at King Ranch National Conservation Area. In the center of the photo, waves are crashing onto the beach with a single individual standing at the edge of the water. On the right side of the photo are rocks and land. At the top left, the sun is setting above the ocean. In the top right corner is the Bureau of Land Management logo. At the bottom is the name of the area and the hashtag #mypubliclandsroadtrip

As with “The Starry Night”, you might start by describing what you see in the visual quite literally. Begin by focusing on colors, shading, shapes, and font. With the Bureau of Land Management ad, you could begin by describing the multiple shades of blues and browns in the landscape. Next, you might focus on the contrasts between the sea and land, and the sea and sky. Making note of textures presented by various rock formations and the sand would add depth to your analysis. You might also note the solitary person walking along the shoreline. Finally, you would want to observe the placement of the sun in the sky at the horizon.

Next, respond to the ways in which the things you described have impacted you as a viewer. What emotions are evoked from the various shadings and colors used in the photo? How does the artist’s font selection impact the image? Through these observations, you will be able to identify appeals to ethos and pathos. In the Bureau of Land Management ad, you might respond to the various shades of blue as seemingly unreal yet reflect on their natural beauty as a way of creating an inviting tone. Next, reflect on the textures presented by the rocks and sand as a way of adding texture to the image. This texture further contributes to the welcoming mood of the image. By focusing on the solitary person in the image, you might respond that this landscape offers a welcoming place to reflect on life decisions or to simply enjoy the surroundings. Finally, you might respond to the placement of the sun as being either sunrise or sunset.

After describing and reflecting on the various elements of the visual, question what you have noted and decide if there is an argument presented by the image. Again, this assessment should be made based upon what you’ve observed and reflected upon in terms of the content of the image alone. Using the Bureau of Land Management ad, you might ask if the font choice was intentional to replicate the rolling waves, or if the framing around the edges of the image is done intentionally to tie back into the Bureau logo in the upper right-hand corner. Once you’ve moved beyond the surface image, question the criteria you established in your thesis and introduction to see if it holds up throughout your analysis. Now you are ready to begin writing a visual rhetorical analysis of an argument presented by/within your selected image.

  • This exercise was inspired by a workshop titled “Working with Primary Sources,” hosted by Meg Steele, given at the Library of Congress alongside the National Council of Teachers of English Convention in Washington, D.C. in November 2014. ↵
  • Vincent Van Gogh, The Starry Night, 1889, oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art, New York City, Wikimedia Commons, accessed November 15, 2021, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Van_Gogh_-_Starry_Night_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg . ↵
  • "Drop A Line: Explore Your Lands! My Public Lands Summer Roadtrip 2016," Bureau of Land Management, accessed November 14, 2021, https://www.arcgis.com/apps/Cascade/index.html?appid=0d3fdf6ca0e44d258adde314479b3bdb . ↵
  • Bureau of Land Management, My Public Lands Roadtrip, June 3, 2015, digital photograph, Flickr, accessed January 6, 2021, https://www.flickr.com/photos/91981596@N06/18607529954 . Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License . ↵
  • “King Range National Conservation Area,” U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management, accessed January 14, 2021, https://www.blm.gov/programs/national-conservation-lands/california/king-range-national-conservation-area . ↵

To resound, reverberate, or vibrate; to produce a positive emotional response about a subject.

Cloudy, hazy, or murky; ambiguous, imprecise, or vague.

A statement, usually one sentence, that summarizes an argument that will later be explained, expanded upon, and developed in a longer essay or research paper. In undergraduate writing, a thesis statement is often found in the introductory paragraph of an essay. The plural of thesis is theses .

Ceasing and beginning or stopping and starting in a recurrent, cyclical or periodic pattern.

3.14 Writing a Visual Analysis Copyright © 2023 by Terri Pantuso is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Humanities LibreTexts

15.3: Sample Student Essays

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The essays below are intended as models for students' own writing in college.

  • Sample summary "Spread Feminism, Not Germs" in PDF with margin notes     
  • Sample summary "Spread Feminism, Not Germs" accessible version with notes in parentheses     
  • Sample summary "Typography and Identity" in PDF with margin notes  
  • Sample summary "Typography and Identity" accessible version with notes in parentheses

Summary and Assessment Essays (Critical Analyses)

  • Sample assessment "Spread Feminism, Not Germs" in PDF with margin notes     
  • Sample assessment "Spread Feminism, Not Germs" accessible version with notes in parentheses     
  • Sample assessment "Typography and Identity" in PDF with margin notes  
  • Sample assessment "Typography and Identity" accessible version with notes in parentheses  

Summary, Assessment, and Response Essays

  • Sample response paper "Spread Feminism, Not Germs" in PDF with margin notes     
  • Sample response paper "Spread Feminism, Not Germs" accessible version with notes in parentheses     
  • Sample response paper "Typography and Identity" in PDF with margin notes  
  • Sample response paper "Typography and Identity" accessible version with notes in parentheses  

Compare-and-Contrast Essays

The essay "Contested Territory" compares and contrasts two arguments on immigration: "Wouldn't We All Cross the Border" by Anna Mills and "The Weight of the World" by Saramanda Swigart. Annotations point out how the author structures the comparison.

  • Sample compare-and-contrast essay "Contested Territory" in PDF version with margin notes
  • Sample compare-and-contrast essay "Contested Territory" accessible version with notes in parentheses

Argument Analysis Essays (Rhetorical Analysis)

The brief essay "Henig's Perspective on the Gender Revolution" by student Jun Stephens can serve as an example of argument analysis.

  • Sample argument analysis essay "Henig's Perspective on the Gender Revolution" in PDF with margin notes
  • Sample argument analysis essay "Henig's Perspective on the Gender Revolution" accessible version with notes in parentheses

The essay "Argument Analysis of Cory Doctorow’s 'Why I Won’t Buy an iPad (and Think You Shouldn’t, Either)'" can serve as an example.

  • Sample argument analysis essay "Argument Analysis of Cory Doctorow’s “Why I Won’t Buy an iPad (and Think You Shouldn’t, Either) " in PDF with margin notes
  • Sample argument analysis essay "Argument Analysis of Cory Doctorow’s “Why I Won’t Buy an iPad (and Think You Shouldn’t, Either) " accessible version with notes in parentheses

Visual Argument Analysis Essays

The essay "An Image Is Worth a Thousand Calls to Arms" by Saramanda Swigart analyzes a visual argument.

  • Sample visual argument analysis essay "An Image Is Worth a Thousand Calls to Arms" in PDF with margin notes
  • Sample visual argument analysis essay "An Image Is Worth a Thousand Calls to Arms" accessible version with notes in parentheses

Research Papers

Research-based definition arguments.

  • Sample definition essay "Defining Stereotypes" in PDF version with margin notes
  • Sample definition essay "Defining Stereotypes" accessible version with notes in parentheses . 
  • “ Trust ” by Chris Thurman . This five-paragraph student essay defines the concept of trust and discusses its fragility and complications.  (CC BY-SA)
  • “ Mass Incarceration: The Real Trends of the United States Justice System ” by Darius Porter. This nine-paragraph student essay defines the concept of justice through the lens of America’s war on drugs resulting in mass incarcerations. The author discusses the impact of mandatory sentencing laws designed to target people based on race and/or income level in order to enrich the current private prison industry. Source:  Successful College Composition  by   Kathryn Crowther et al., provided by Galileo, Georgia's Virtual Library.  CC-NC-SA-4.0 .

Research-Based Evaluation Arguments

  • Sample evaluation essay "Universal Health Care Coverage for the United States" in PDF version with margin notes
  • Sample evaluation essay "Universal Health Care Coverage for the United States" accessible version with notes in parentheses

“ The Story of My Working Thesis Malfunction ” by Amanda Kenger. The author walks the reader through her process of writing a thesis on Janet Jackson’s 2004 Super Bowl wardrobe malfunction. The author wrote four essays trying to define the focus of the final essay: A proposal essay, a critique essay, an antithesis essay, and a categorization essay. The author discusses the development of research skills and evaluates the writing process and final thesis. (CC BY-NC-SA)  

Research-Based Causal Arguments

The article "Climate Explained: Why Carbon Dioxide Has Such Outsized Influence on Earth’s Climate" by Jason West, published in The Conversation , explains why scientists are convinced that carbon dioxide causes climate change. Annotations point out how the author uses several causal argument strategies.    

  • Sample causal essay "Climate Explained: Why Carbon Dioxide Has Such Outsized Influence on Earth’s Climate" in PDF version with margin notes
  • Sample causal essay "Climate Explained: Why Carbon Dioxide Has Such Outsized Influence on Earth’s Climate" accessible version with notes in parentheses

“ Effects of Video Game Addiction .” This six-paragraph student essay focuses on the potential negative impact of excessive video game playing. Concerns mentioned are disruption in the player’s career, decline in overall health and hygiene, and a loss of valuable socialization. While video game players may perceive that they are involved in e-based communities, the author points out that these forms of communication rarely translate to face-to-face social interaction. ( English Composition I: Rhetorical Methods-Based,  CC BY-NC-SA) 

“ Crossing the Line: Remembering September 11 ” by Theresa Henkes. This seven-paragraph student essay discusses the negative impact of commercialization of September 11th by the entertainment industry. The author mentions special features, movies, magazines, and video games all designed to make money rather than help the nation mourn and heal. In contrast, voluntary and reverent memorials and museums offer the opportunity to reflect on the tragedy without the motive of financial gain. ( Excelsior OWL , CC BY 4.0)

Research-Based Proposal Arguments

The sample essay "Why We Should Open Our Borders" by student Laurent Wenjun Jiang makes a brief, general proposal argument. Annotations point out how Jiang uses several proposal argument strategies.    

  • Sample proposal essay "Why We Should Open Our Borders" in PDF with margin notes
  • Sample proposal essay "Why We Should Open Our Borders" accessible version with notes in parentheses
  • “ Rethinking Recycling: Why Reusing Needs to Be User Friendly ” by Emily Hanna. This seven-paragraph student essay, in APA format, proposes colleges and communities adopt a recycling approach currently being used by the University of Maryland. This approach uses numerous color-coded bins, in a uniform manner across the entire campus, making the process of recycling easier thereby attracting more participants. Citing the cost of resources to produce new materials and the lack of landfill space, the author encourages other colleges to adopt a similar recycling approach. ( Excelsior OWL , CC BY 4.0)

Attributions

List and essay descriptions by Cynthia Spence and Anna Mills, licensed CC BY NC 4.0 .

Visual Analysis Essay

Barbara P

Visual Analysis Essay - A Writing Guide with Format & Sample

14 min read

Visual Analysis Essay

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A visual analysis essay is a common assignment for the students of history, art, and communications. It is quite a unique type of academic essay. 

Visual analysis essays are where images meet text. These essays aim to analyze the meanings embedded in the artworks, explaining visual concepts in a written form. 

It may sound difficult to write a visual analysis essay, but it can be done in simple steps by following the right approach. Let’s dive into the writing steps, tips, example essays, and potential topics to help you write an excellent essay. 

Arrow Down

  • 1. What is a Visual Analysis Essay
  • 2. How to Write a Visual Analysis Essay - 7 Simple Steps
  • 3. Tips on How to Analyze a Photograph
  • 4. Tips on How to Analyze a Sculpture
  • 5. Visual Analysis Essay on Advertisement
  • 6. Visual Rhetorical Analysis Essay Examples
  • 7. Visual Analysis Essay Topics

What is a Visual Analysis Essay

A visual analysis essay basically requires you to provide a detailed description of a specific visual work of art. It is a type of analytical essay that deals with imagery and visual art instead of texts.

The subject of a visual analysis essay could be an image, painting, photograph, or any visual medium. 

In this type of essay, you need to describe the artwork and analyze its elements in detail. That is, how different elements and features fit together to make the whole work stand out. In this sense, you need to use a mixture of descriptive writing and analytical language. 

To write a good visual analysis essay, you need to know the basic visual elements and principles of design. Let’s learn about these concepts first before diving into the writing steps.

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Visual Elements for a Visual Analysis Essay

Writing a visual analysis essay involves analyzing the visual elements of a piece of art. These elements form the basis of the features and characteristics of an image. 

Below you can find the common visual elements of a visual analysis essay.

Principles of Design in a Visual Analysis Essay

In addition to visual elements, you must also consider the principles of design for writing a great visual analysis essay. These principles help you identify and explain the characteristics of the image. 

How to Write a Visual Analysis Essay - 7 Simple Steps

Now that you have an idea about visual elements and principles, you are now ready to proceed. 

Here are the steps that you need to follow for writing a visual analysis essay. Let’s discuss them in detail.

Step 1 - Gather General Information About the Artwork

Once you have a specific artwork or image, here is how to start a visual analysis essay. You need to ask some basic questions about the work and jot down your ideas.

This pre-writing step is for brainstorming ideas. Ask these questions to begin:

  • Who and what does the artwork represent? 
  • Who is the author of the piece? 
  • Who did the artist create the work for? Who is the intended audience?
  • When and where was the work created? What is its historical context?
  • Where was this work displayed for the first time?
  • Identify which medium, materials, and techniques were used to create the image?

Step 2 - Note Down the Characteristics of the Artwork

The next thing that you need to do is identify what the image depicts. Moreover, you need to identify and describe the visual art elements and design principles used in the work. 

Here’s what you need to note:

  • The subject matter and its representation.
  • Colors, shapes, and lines used in the composition.
  • The balance, proportion, and harmony within the artwork.
  • Any symbolism or metaphors present.

By pointing out such characteristics, you set the stage for a nuanced analysis in your essay.

Step 3 - Visual Analysis Essay Outline 

Once you have gathered your main points by carefully studying the image, you should now organize them in an outline.

Here is how you make an outline for your visual analysis essay:

Step 4- Write the Introduction

This is the first paragraph of a visual analysis essay in which you need to provide some background information on the topic. After grabbing the readers’ attention with an interesting fact, briefly provide information on the following points. 

  • Talk briefly about the painting and its artist or creator.
  • Provide a brief description of the painting and give historical context
  • Add an interesting fact about the artist or the painting. 

The introduction should end with a thesis statement. The visual analysis essay thesis states the analysis points on the artwork that you aim to discuss in your essay. 

Step 5 - Provide Detailed Description, Analysis, and Interpretation

In the body section, you need to explore the artwork in detail. In the first body paragraph, simply describe the features and characteristics of the work. For instance, talk about the technique being used, shape, color, and other aspects to support your thesis. 

In the next paragraphs, you can go into the analysis and interpretation of these elements and the work as a whole. Present all the details logically and discuss the relationship between the objects. Talk about the meaning, significance, and impact of the work.

Step 6 - Writing a Conclusion

Once you have completed the body section, move to the conclusion paragraph. This is the last paragraph of the essay that should be strong and well-written to create a sense of closure.

Here’s how you can do it

  • Revisit the main insights gained through the analysis, summarizing the key visual elements and principles discussed. 
  • Emphasize the significance of cultural or historical context in interpreting the visual narrative. 
  • Tie together the threads of your analysis to reinforce your thesis or main argument.
  • End with a memorable statement and encourage readers to carry the lessons learned from the analysis into their own encounters with art. 

Step 7 - Edit & Revise Your Essay

Here’s how to end your visual analysis essay: edit and revise your first draft until it becomes the perfect version. Consider these steps for an excellent revision:

  • Review for Clarity: Ensure your ideas flow logically. Clarify any ambiguous or unclear statements to enhance the overall readability of your essay.
  • Trim Unnecessary Details: Trim excess information that doesn't directly contribute to your main points. Keep your analysis focused and concise.
  • Check Consistency: Verify that your writing style remains consistent throughout the essay. Maintain a balance between formal language and engaging expression.
  • Fine-Tune Transitions: Ensure smooth transitions between different sections of your essay. Transitions help guide your reader through the analysis, making the journey more enjoyable and comprehensible.
  • Proofread for Errors: Carefully proofread your essay for grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors. A polished essay enhances your credibility and the overall professionalism of your work.

With these basic steps, you can craft an amazing visual analysis essay. Read on for some useful tips for analyzing different kinds of visual subjects.

Tips on How to Analyze a Photograph

Painting and photograph analysis are very similar. There are three ways in which photo visual analysis is conducted: description, reflection, and formal analysis.

Although the historical study may be used, it is not necessary.

  • Description -  It implies examining the picture carefully and considering all of the details. The description should be neutral, focusing on simple facts without expressing a personal viewpoint.
  • Reflection -  For the next stage, consider the emotions that the picture stirs in you. Every viewer will have a distinct viewpoint and feelings about the piece. Knowing some historical background might be useful when formulating an educated response.
  • Formal analysis -  Consider the visual components and concepts. How are they shown in the photo?
  • Historical analysis -  For a contextual analysis, keep an eye on the photo's surroundings. Make sure you comprehend the surrounding environment in which the photograph was taken. What era was this image shot during?

Tips on How to Analyze a Sculpture

A sculpture, unlike a painting or photograph, requires a different approach to visual analysis. It still depends on visible components and principles, however it does so in a slightly different way.

When you're writing about sculptures, keep the following in mind:

  • Medium, size, and technique -  What kind of material is it? Is it carved in a negative or positive method?
  • Color and lightning -  Describe the hue of the sculpture, whether it is painted. Was the sculptor concerned with the illumination when creating the work?
  • Human body and scale -  Consider how a human body is portrayed in the piece. Also, assess the sculpture's size compared to that of the viewer.
  • Function -  What was the sculpture's main aim? You could speak about whether it represented a religious conviction or honored someone, for example.
  • Composition -  Examine the placement of the piece and determine whether there is a focal point.

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Visual Analysis Essay on Advertisement

In advertisements, visuals are used to pique interest or persuade the public that what is being advertised is needed. The goal of a visual argument is to generate attention and intrigue. Images are utilized in advertisements to transmit information and interact with the audience.

When conducting a visual analysis of an ad, keep the following in mind:

  • Textual Elements
  • Illustrations
  • Composition

This all has an impact on how people perceive information and how they react to it.

When you analyze the visuals of an ad, you're performing a rhetorical analysis. The study of images and extracting information from them is known as visual rhetoric. It aids in the comprehension of typography, imagery, and the structure of elements on the page.

How to Write a Visual Analysis Paper on an Advertisement

Visual components in advertising are important. It aids in the persuasion of the audience.

Always keep the rhetorical situation in mind while analyzing visual arguments. The following are some key elements to consider:

  • Audience -  Who is the advertisement meant to attract?
  • Purpose -  What message does the photo try to get across to the audience?
  • Design -  What kind of visualizations are included? Are the visuals clear and easy to follow? Are there any patterns or repetitions in the design?
  • Strategies -  Is there any humor, celebrities, or cultural allusions in the graphic's message?
  • Medium -  Is the photograph surrounded by text? Is there any text within the picture? How does it interact with the picture to produce an intended effect if there is any?
  • Context -  What are the characters in an ad? Where are they positioned?
  • Subtext -  Consider the meaning of the picture's words. What are they trying to say?

Visual Rhetorical Analysis Essay Examples

Here are some visual analysis essay samples that you can read to understand this type of essay better. 

Art history Visual Analysis Essay Example

Political Cartoon Visual Analysis Essay

Rhetorical and Visual Analysis Essay Sample

Mona Lisa Visual Analysis Essay

Visual Analysis Essay Topics

Here are some top visual analysis essay topics that you can choose from and begin the writing process.

  • Make a review of your favorite Hollywood production and discuss the visual arts involved.
  • Write about the use of color and action in TV commercials.
  • Discuss how the brand name is displayed in digital media campaigns.
  • Discuss different types of visual appeals used in web ads.
  • What is the special about Cleo Award-winning ads?
  • The Use of Light and Shadow in Caravaggio's "The Calling of Saint Matthew"
  • The Symbolism of Colors in Vincent van Gogh's "Starry Night"
  • What is the importance of art and culture in our life?
  • How has art changed over the last 50 years?
  • The use of colors in marketing and advertising. 

To conclude, 

From gathering information about the artwork to crafting a compelling analysis, we've navigated the essential steps you need for a visual analysis essay. Moreover, with the specific tips and examples, you have everything you need to get started.

So dive into the writing process with confidence and return to this blog whenever you need help on any step!

However, if you have gone through the whole article and are still unsure how to start your essay, we can help you.

Our professional essay writers at MyPerfectWords.com can help you with your visual analysis essay assignment. Contact us with your order details, and we will get it done for you. 

We provide the best essay writing service that you can trust for better grades. Place your order now and get the best visual analysis essay writing help. 

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Barbara P

Dr. Barbara is a highly experienced writer and author who holds a Ph.D. degree in public health from an Ivy League school. She has worked in the medical field for many years, conducting extensive research on various health topics. Her writing has been featured in several top-tier publications.

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    Visual Argument Example: Gatorade Ad. Among the diversity of visual argument images, one of the most powerful for a visual argument analysis essay is Gatorade’s advertisement—a drink for sportspeople. It illustrates the superiority of the Gatorade drink, among other beverages. A bright picture of a bottle and a memorable slogan is a ...

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    The use of visuals to reflect naturality in an advertisement impacts more than just mere words to the target groups. The use of shock appeal in this advertisement has largely made the message being conveyed sink deeper in the target group’s heart. Having a figurative contestant in a racing tournament who seems to be reaching the sky, reflects ...

  3. 10.8.1: Annotated Sample Visual Argument Analysis ...

    Listen to an audio version of this page (10 min, 27 sec): Format note: This version is accessible to screen reader users. Refer to these tips for reading our annotated sample arguments with a screen reader. For a more traditional visual format, see the PDF version of "An Image Is Worth a Thousand Calls to Arms." Student Y.

  4. 3.14 Writing a Visual Analysis – Informed Arguments: A Guide ...

    Arguments About a Visual. Take for example Vincent Van Gogh’s “The Starry Night” (Figure 3.14.1). [2] If you want to argue that the painting is a classic example of fine art, you’ll first have to define the criteria for your terms “classic” and “fine art.”

  5. 10.8: A Sample Visual Argument Analysis - Humanities LibreTexts

    Sample visual argument analysis essay "An Image Is Worth a Thousand Calls to Arms" accessible version with notes in parentheses. This page titled 10.8: A Sample Visual Argument Analysis is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Saramanda Swigart. 10.8.1: Annotated Sample Visual Argument Analysis.

  6. How to Write Visual Argument Essays: Pros and Cons of Visuals

    A visual argument essay is an argumentative essay that includes photos or illustrations. Using visuals in your argumentative essays is a good idea, especially if you want to make your points stronger. A visual argument essay is a form of persuasion and can use to persuade people by showing them how they feel about something.

  7. 15.3: Sample Student Essays - Humanities LibreTexts

    Attributions. List and essay descriptions by Cynthia Spence and Anna Mills, licensed CC BY NC 4.0. 15.3: Sample Student Essays is shared under a license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts. These student essays serve as models for the specific kinds of college writing described in the textbook.

  8. How to write Visual Argument Essay: Format & Topic Examples

    3. Write Your Visual Argument Essay. When writing your visual argument essay, begin with an introduction. It should briefly provide the content and context of the essay. Be brief and start the introduction with a statement that hooks the audience. Let it be catchy to arouse the interest of your audience.

  9. Tips for Writing Effective Visual Arguments Essay

    Visual Argument Examples. Writing a visual argument essay can be difficult if you are inexperienced. However, if you want to make your work more comfortable, you can check visual arguments online to familiarize yourself with how to compose high-quality papers. Reasons Why You Should Write Visual Essays

  10. Visual Analysis Essay: Outline, Topics, & Examples

    Here are some top visual analysis essay topics that you can choose from and begin the writing process. Make a review of your favorite Hollywood production and discuss the visual arts involved. Write about the use of color and action in TV commercials. Discuss how the brand name is displayed in digital media campaigns.