Self-Motivation Explained + 100 Ways To Motivate Yourself

What is Self-Motivation? 100+ Ways to Motivate Yourself (Definition + Quotes)

To demonstrate this point, let’s consider two scenarios you’ve likely experienced:

  • You have something you have to do . You’re not excited or passionate about it, but you know you need to get it done. This feeling of obligation motivates you to work hard to complete the task;
  • You have something you get to do . You’re interested in your task—you might have even assigned this task for yourself rather than receiving it from someone else—and you are happy to put in the time and effort to complete it.

In which scenario are you more effective? In which scenario are you more efficient? And, in which scenario do you feel the most fulfilled?

I’m willing to bet that your answer to each of those questions is Scenario 2.

It likely won’t come as a surprise that doing something for its own sake and for your own purposes is likely to be more fulfilling, enjoyable, and successful than doing something to meet external standards or to please others.

The feeling described in Scenario 2 is that of being self-motivated . Read on to learn more about self-motivation and why it’s the most effective kind of motivation.

Before you continue, we thought you might like to download our three Goal Achievement Exercises for free . These detailed, science-based exercises will help you or your clients create actionable goals and master techniques to create lasting behavior change.

This Article Contains:

  • What Is the Meaning of Self-Motivation?

3 Examples of Self-Motivation

The psychology of self-motivation: how are self-efficacy and motivation related, the importance of self-motivation, is self-motivation a skill and can it be developed through training, how to foster self-motivation in the workplace, research on self-motivation.

  • 17 Activities, Exercises, and Worksheets for Self-Motivation (PDF)

5 Meditations to Promote Self-Motivation

Self-motivation quizzes, questionnaires, and tests, apps for increasing self-motivation, popular podcasts on self-motivation, 22 quotes and messages to ignite self-motivation, 6 images to inspire self-motivation, 15 recommended movies to get yourself motivated, ted talks, speeches, and videos on self-motivation, 7 books on self-motivation, a take-home message, what is the meaning of self-motivation.

Above, we explored a basic example of self-motivation, but here’s a succinct definition of the concept:

“Self-motivation is, in its simplest form, the force that drives you to do things”

(Skills You Need, n.d.).

It’s the drive you have to work toward your goals, to put effort into self-development, and to achieve personal fulfillment.

It’s important to note here that self-motivation is generally driven by intrinsic motivation, a kind of motivation that comes from sincerely wanting to achieve and desiring the inherent rewards associated with it.

Self-motivation can also be driven by extrinsic motivation, the drive to achieve that comes from wanting the external rewards (like money, power, status, or recognition), although it’s clear that intrinsic motivation is usually a more effective and fulfilling drive.

Self-Motivation and Emotional Intelligence

According to emotional intelligence expert Daniel Goleman, self-motivation is a key component of emotional intelligence . Emotional intelligence is the measure of one’s ability to recognize and manage his or her own emotions and the emotions of other people.

Self-motivation’s relevance to emotional intelligence highlights its role within our ability to understand ourselves, relate to others, and succeed in reaching our goals .

Goleman states that there are four components of motivation:

  • Achievement drive, or the personal drive to achieve, improve, and meet certain standards;
  • Commitment to your own personal goals;
  • Initiative, or the “readiness to act on opportunities”;
  • Optimism, or the tendency to look ahead and persevere with the belief that you can reach your goals (Skills You Need, n.d.).

What is Self-Motivation? examples

  • A man who goes to work every only as a means to pay the bills, keep his family off his back, and please his boss is not self-motivated, while a man who needs no external forces to make the trek into work every day and finds fulfillment in what he does is self-motivated;
  • The student who only completes her homework because her parents remind her or nag her, or because they ground her when she fails to complete it is not self-motivated, but the student who completes her homework with no prodding because she wants to learn and succeed in school is self-motivated;
  • The woman who only goes to the gym when her friends drag her there or because her doctor is adamant that she needs to exercise to get healthy is not self-motivated, but the woman who likes the way exercise makes her feel and schedules time at the gym whether or not anyone encourages her is self-motivated.

As you can see, self-motivation is all about where your drive comes from; if your motivation comes from within and pushes you to achieve for your own personal reasons, it can be considered self-motivation.

If you are only motivated to achieve standards set by someone else and not for your own internal satisfaction, you are probably not self-motivated.

It’s possible to be self-motivated in some areas and not in others. For example, if the man from the first example is not internally motivated to go to work but is sure to make time for his marathon training, he is not self-motivated when it comes to work but might be self-motivated to run.

essay on self motivation

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Psychologist Scott Geller is at the forefront of research on self-motivation, and he explains that there are three questions you can use to determine whether you (or someone in your life) is self-motivated:

  • Can you do it?
  • Will it work?
  • Is it worth it?

If you answered “yes” to each question, you are likely self-motivated.

If you believe you can do it, you have self-efficacy . If you believe it will work, you have response efficacy—belief that the action you are taking will lead to the outcome you want. And if you believe it is worth it, you have weighed the cost against the consequences and decided the consequences outweigh the cost (Geller, 2016).

Speaking of consequences, Geller considers “consequences” to be one of four vital “C” words that underpin self-motivation:

  • Consequences: To be self-motivated, you sincerely have to want the consequences associated with the actions you take rather than simply doing something to avoid negative consequences;
  • Competence: If you answer all three of the questions above with a “yes,” you will feel competent in your ability to get things done;
  • Choice: Having a sense of autonomy over your actions encourages self-motivation;
  • Community: Having social support and connections with others is critical for feeling motivated and believing in yourself and your power to achieve (Geller, 2016).

Much of Geller’s work on self-motivation is grounded in the research of psychologist and self-efficacy researcher Albert Bandura . In 1981, Bandura set the stage for Geller’s current conceptualization of self-motivation with this description:

“Self-motivation . . . requires personal standards against which to evaluate ongoing performance. By making self-satisfaction conditional on a certain level of performance, individuals create self-inducements to persist in their efforts until their performances match internal standards. Both the anticipated satisfactions for matching attainments and the dissatisfactions with insufficient ones provide incentives for self-directed actions”

(Bandura & Schunk, 1981).

From this quote, you can see where Geller’s three questions come from. Believing that you can do it, that it will work, and that it is worth it will drive you to match the internal standards you set for yourself.

We explore this further in The Science of Self-Acceptance Masterclass© .

The DARN-C acronym is a commonly used tool in motivational interviewing. Motivational interviewing is a directive, client-centered treatment that enhances intrinsic motivation to make positive life changes (Miller & Rollnick, 2013).

The DARN-C acronym stands for desire , ability , reason , need , and commitment , which builds the basis of change talk.

1. Desire indicates precisely what the client wants and wishes for. This desire is the motivating factor for change. 2. The ability component of motivation is necessary because clients must believe that they can change, so a realistic perspective on how achievable this change can be is needed. 3. The reason for the change can be motivated by current pitfalls, benefits of a changed future, or aspects of both. 4. The need indicates the urgency of the change without specifying the underlying reason. The needs that arise during motivational interviewing questions reflect the importance of the shift to the individual. 5. Lastly, commitment is about specific actions that the client will take to change, an understanding of how to convert intentions into concrete action plans.

essay on self motivation

As you have likely already guessed, self-motivation is an important concept. While pleasing others and meeting external standards can certainly motivate us to get things done, such efforts aren’t exactly labors of love.

In other words, doing things because we feel we have to do them or to gain some external reward is enough in many cases, but it doesn’t invoke the passion needed to drive innovation and excellence.

It’s fine to use external sources to motivate you in some areas, but external motivation is less likely to leave you feeling personally fulfilled and finding deeper meaning in your life .

Not only do we generally do better work when we are self-motivated, but we are also better able to cope with stress and are simply happier when we are doing what we want to be doing.

Is Self-Motivation a Skill and Can It Be Developed Through Training?

The answer is a definite “yes.”

Self-motivation is driven by a set of skills that are within your control. Read on to learn how to use this to your advantage.

12 Tips and Skills to Motivate Yourself Today

The Skills You Need website lists six vital skills that form the foundation of self-motivation, and they are all skills that you can develop through sustained effort:

  • Setting high but realistic goals (e.g., SMART goals);
  • Taking the right level of risk;
  • Constantly seeking feedback to figure out how to improve;
  • Being committed to personal and/or organizational goals and going the extra mile to achieve them;
  • Actively seeking out opportunities and seizing them when they occur;
  • Being able to deal with setbacks and continue to pursue your goals despite obstacles (i.e., resilience).

Further, there are six things you can do to maintain your self-motivation:

  • Continue learning and acquiring knowledge (i.e., develop a love of learning);
  • Spend time with motivated, enthusiastic, and supportive people;
  • Cultivate a positive mindset and build your optimism and resilience;
  • Identify your strengths and weaknesses, and work on them;
  • Avoid procrastination and work on your time management skills;
  • Get help when you need it, and be willing to help others succeed (Skills You Need, n.d.).

14 Strategies for Students to Increase Their Self-Motivation to Study

Students are particularly well-suited to reap the benefits of self-motivation, but it can be hard to be self-motivated in the current educational environment.

Luckily, there are some things you can do as teachers, parents, and adult mentors to help students become self-motivated. In addition, there are plenty of strategies that students can apply themselves.

Here are some ideas for how to encourage self-motivation in students:

  • Provide students with as much autonomy and freedom of choice as possible (e.g., give students a choice in their seating arrangements or a range of options for their final project, and implement problem-based learning);
  • Provide useful feedback, praise hard work, and deliver critical feedback using words like “and” and “what if” instead of “but” to encourage student competence;
  • Cultivate a high-quality relationship with your students by taking a genuine interest in them, acting friendly, staying flexible, keeping your focus on the end goal of learning, and not giving up on them;
  • Encourage your students to think about, write about, and discuss how what they are learning is relevant to their own lives (Ferlazzo, 2015).

And, here are some ways that students can bolster their own self-motivation:

  • Attach meaning to your studies and take personal ownership over your knowledge and learning;
  • Create a plan: Map out your semester, your month, your week, and even your day;
  • Build a routine and apply time management skills to become more organized and productive;
  • Identify several comfortable study environments (they should be quiet and have few distractions);
  • Get enough sleep, eat nutritious food, and exercise regularly to stay healthy;
  • Tame “time monsters” like the internet, video games, or unproductive time spent with friends;
  • Avoid multitasking by choosing one subject or task to work on at a time and focusing all of your attention on it;
  • Take planned—and well-earned—breaks to stay refreshed and motivated;
  • Connect with a support system of friends and family who will encourage you to do your best;
  • Talk positively to yourself (Buckle, 2013).

You may find it much easier to encourage self-motivation in the workplace than in school.

After all, everyone in the workplace is there because they chose to be there, not because they’re required to be there by the law or by their parents. Employees might have vastly disparate reasons for being at work, but it’s unlikely they were compelled to work for their specific organization against their will.

As a manager, there are many ways to foster self-motivation in the workplace, including:

  • Giving your employees one-on-one attention, feedback, and recognition;
  • Ensure your employees have opportunities for meaningful advancement as well as training and education opportunities;
  • Set the example in terms of tone, work ethic, and values . Be a role model for positivity, optimism, and hard work;
  • Cultivate an uplifting and motivating culture that encourages employees to want to do their best;
  • Foster socialization through teamwork and team-based activities, projects, and events;
  • Stay as transparent as possible and open yourself up to questions, concerns, and ideas from your employees. Implement an open-door policy to ensure your employees feel heard (DeMers, 2015).

Writers Nick Nanton and J. W. Dicks at Fast Company offer some further strategies to ensure that both you and your employees stay motivated:

  • Sell your mission statement to your team as you would to an investor. Ensure the people working to meet that mission understand it and buy into it;
  • Foster a culture in which each employee has a specific job and a specific role with the organization, and give them room to grow and opportunities to implement ambitious new ideas;
  • Focus on inspiring your staff instead of just motivating them. Inspired employees will inherently be motivated;
  • Show your team recognition and appreciation for the hard work they do;
  • Share your passion with your team and lead from the front by developing a positive mindset and displaying a positive attitude (2015).

Techniques to Motivate Yourself at Work

You can also take control of your own self-motivation at work. Some good techniques for becoming more self-motivated at work include:

  • Finding work that interests you (This is a vital tip—it’s much easier to be self-motivated when you are passionate about what you do and fully engaged in it.);
  • Request feedback from your boss or colleagues to learn about where you can improve and to enhance role clarity;
  • Learn a new skill that is relevant to your role (or your desired role);
  • Ask for a raise. Financial incentives are generally considered extrinsic motivation, but if you’re happy with your position, being paid what you think you are worth can be very self-motivating;
  • Remind yourself of your “why,” the reason you do the work you do. When you are doing meaningful work, you are more likely to find fulfillment and stay self-motivated;
  • Volunteer your services to others (This is especially helpful if you have trouble defining your “why.”);
  • Take a vacation to allow yourself to rest, recharge, and come back refreshed and ready to work (Stahl, 2016).

The research on self-motivation clarifies its vital role in helping us achieve our goals. Check out the findings on two important and related topics below.

Self-Discipline and Self-Motivation

While self-discipline and self-motivation are two distinct concepts, self-discipline is vital to maintaining self-motivation. It’s not enough simply to be self-motivated—to achieve your goals, you need to couple self-motivation with self-discipline.

A study of online learners showed that even though they might all be considered self-motivated (since they are all taking a voluntary course with the goal of learning), those with self-discipline were the most likely to succeed.

Those who were highly self-disciplined displayed higher competence at the end of the course, fulfilled more external tasks, and were more effective in achieving their goals (Gorbunovs, Kapenieks, & Cakula, 2016).

Self-Motivation and Weight Loss

Very often, self-motivation is a key component of weight loss. Research on the connection between the two is quite clear.

In multiple studies, researchers found that participants who reported greater autonomy support and self-determined motivation were more effective in losing weight, more likely to keep the weight off for longer periods of time, and more positive about their weight loss journey (Teixeira, Silva, Mata, Palmeira, & Markland, 2012).

When we have our own closely held reasons for wanting to lose weight—and these reasons are based on personal fulfillment rather than meeting external standards—we are much more likely to find success.

16 Activities, Exercises, and Worksheets for Self-Motivation (PDFs)

17 Activities, Exercises, and Worksheets for Self-Motivation (PDF)

Check out the activities, exercises, and worksheets below to find ways to enhance your self-motivation. Or, share these resources with your clients to help them get self-motivated.

Quick and Easy Motivation Techniques

Some techniques and exercises are more difficult than others. If you’re looking for a quick and easy exercise or activity to boost your self-motivation, try these:

  • Listen to motivational music, like: a. Bill Conti’s Gonna Fly Now ; b. Paul Engemann’s Push it to the Limit ; c. Queen’s We Will Rock You ; d. Kenny Loggins’ Danger Zone ; e. ACDC’s Thunderstruck .
  • Watch a motivational movie, like: a. Forrest Gump ; b. The Pursuit of Happyness ; c. Life is Beautiful ; d. Rain Man ; e . The Family Man .
  • Read books that boost motivation from authors like: a. Napoleon Hill; b. Brian Tracy; c. Tony Robbins; d. Jim Rohn (Mueller, 2012).

Stronger Motivational Techniques

If you need techniques with a bit more power, you can try these:

  • Set wisely chosen and deeply personal goals that you are excited about working toward;
  • Schedule rewards for yourself when you accomplish your goals (or when you make steps toward your goals, for the larger ones);
  • Visualize yourself achieving and fulfilling these goals;
  • Create a vision board with your goals, aims, and dreams in mind, and post it somewhere you will see it often;
  • Pay attention to your “hierarchy of needs” (à la Abraham Maslow) and ensure you are meeting your lower-level needs (including physiological needs like food and sleep, safety needs, social needs, and esteem needs);
  • Consider using Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), the study linking neurology, language, and programming to understand human experience and motivation;
  • Envision what could happen when you reach your goals, as well as what could happen when you fail to reach your goals;
  • Incorporate things you are interested in and engage your curiosity when setting and working toward your goals;
  • Make a commitment to someone or something to ensure your future self will find it difficult to change plans or put things off (Mueller, 2012).

Self-Motivation Workbook (PDF)

This workbook is an excellent resource for anyone who wants to develop self-motivation.

It contains 23 pages of self-motivation information, activities, and exercises to help you find the drive within yourself that’s needed to achieve your goals.

You’ll find sections like:

  • What Makes People Self-Motivated?;
  • Lack of Energy or Self-Motivation?;
  • Making Decisions;
  • Don’t Make Excuses;
  • Be Clear About Your Decisions;
  • The Three Decisions That Will Shape Your Life;
  • The NAC Concept of Pain and Pleasure;
  • Transforming Yourself.

Please note that you will need to register with www.plr.me to download this workbook. You can find more free motivation tools and worksheets here .

Exercise: Build Self-Efficacy

Building self-efficacy is one of the best ways to develop your self-motivation. It might sound difficult or complex, but there are three simple activities you can do that help get you there:

  • Ensure early success by choosing activities or steps that you know you can do;
  • Watch others succeed in the activity you want to try—this is particularly effective if the person you are observing is similar to you and/or close to you;
  • Find a supportive voice, like a coach, counselor, friendly manager, or mentor to encourage you and give you feedback (Mantell, 2012).

Set SMART Goals

As noted earlier, setting SMART goals is a great way to enhance your self-motivation.

When you set these goals, make sure they are:

  • Measurable;
  • Attainable;

Creating goals for yourself is one of the best things you can do to build a foundation for self-motivation. And if your goals are SMART, you are much more likely to find it easy to motivate yourself.

Getting Motivated to Change

This PDF from Texas Christian University’s Institute of Behavior Research offers many useful handouts and worksheets on motivation, along with some instructions for how to use them and suggestions for implementing change-focused counseling and coaching (Bartholomew, Dansereau, & Simpson, 2006).

It breaks things down into four parts:

  • Motivation 101;
  • The Art of Self-Motivation;
  • Staying Motivated;
  • Making It Second Nature.

All four parts contain great resources, but the Art of Self-Motivation section includes some really useful handouts and worksheets, including:

  • Motivation and Change handout (page 28);
  • Taking a Hard Look – Pros and Cons (page 29);
  • Target Log (page 30).

Some of the resources in this PDF are targeted to people who are recovering from addiction, but it’s easy enough to alter and adapt them for more general use.

Click here to access this 63-page resource.

Meditation can be a great way to help maintain your self-motivation.

Try these meditations to help you stay self-motivated:

  • Mountain Refuge’s Meditation for Self-Motivation ( 20-minute guided meditation from Meditainment);
  • Meditation to Help Stop Procrastination (guided meditation from Jason Stephenson that’s about one half-hour);

  • Guided Meditation—Motivation (11-minute guided meditation from Minds with Integrity);

  • 10 Minute Meditation for Motivation and Building a Positive Mindset (10-minute guided meditation from The Mindful Movement);

  • Guided Meditation—Increase Motivation and Confidence (nine-minute guided meditation from Michael Mackenzie at Project Meditation).

There are several fun quizzes and questionnaires you can use to explore your level of self-motivation. They aren’t all rigorous and validated instruments, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be helpful.

Self-Motivation Quiz From Richard Step

You can find this quick five-minute quiz from Richard Step at this link . It includes 45 questions rated on a three-point scale (with Rarely, Maybe, and A Lot as the three options).

You can take it with a focus on your life in general, or you can narrow your focus to one of several areas, including:

  • Academics and schoolwork;
  • Business ownership;
  • Career growth and change;
  • Creativity;
  • Entrepreneurship and self-employment;
  • Faith and spirituality;
  • Family life;
  • Fitness and health;
  • Friendships;
  • Future vision;
  • Goal setting and completion;
  • Helping other people;
  • Hobbies and casual interests;
  • “I was asked to take the test”;
  • Just for fun or curiosity;
  • Leadership and management;
  • Life purpose and passions;
  • Marriage and relationships
  • Money and wealth;
  • Psychological research;
  • Retirement and legacy living
  • Self-discovery and development;
  • Shopping and spending;
  • Teaching and training others;
  • Teamwork and team-building;
  • Trauma recovery.

Your results from this quiz will help you determine what makes you tick and what your main motivators are.

Motivation Style Quiz

If you want to learn what type of incentives you are most responsive to, this quiz from Martha Beck at Oprah.com can help. It includes only 10 questions with five response options each, so it’s a quick and easy way to discover your motivation style.

Your results will be presented via a score on the five different motivator types:

  • Connection;
  • Accomplishment;
  • Enlightenment;

Scores can range from 1 to 10, with higher scores indicating that something is a greater motivator for you. Anything with a score of 6 or higher can be considered one of your major motivators, while anything below 3 is only minimally important. Your main motivational style is the component with the highest score.

Along with your scores, you will see descriptions of each motivation style to get an idea of what your “type” is like.

The Self-Motivation Inventory

For a slightly more research-backed scale of self-motivation, you might want to consider the Self-Motivation Inventory. This inventory will help you determine your level of self-motivation and whether you’re driven more by internal or external motivators.

It includes 30 items rated on a scale from 1 (less true) to 5 (more true), dependent on how well you feel each item describes you.

A few sample items include:

  • I frequently think about how good I will feel when I accomplish what I have set out to do;
  • If asked about what motivates me to succeed, I would say that the number one factor is a sense of personal fulfillment, that I gave my all and did my best;
  • When I think about the reward for doing something, the first thing I think about is the sense of accomplishment or achievement;
  • On several occasions, I have given myself a consequence for making a poor or less optimal decision. For instance, if I chose to eat an extra helping of dessert, I tell myself to work out an extra 10 minutes at the gym;
  • Even if something makes me feel slightly nervous or uncomfortable, I typically do not have much trouble getting myself to do it.

When you have answered all 30 questions, total your responses for your overall score. Your score will place you within one of the following categories:

  • Total Score 113-150: highly self-motivated;
  • Total Score 75-112: somewhat self-motivated;
  • Total Score 38-74: slightly self-motivated (perhaps in one or two areas, but not overall);
  • Total Score 0-37: not at all self-motivated (more externally motivated).

This inventory was developed by Milana Leshinsky and Larina Kase, and you can find it at this link .

If you’ve committed to becoming more self-motivated and working toward your goals, these seven smartphone apps can help you get started and maintain your drive:

  • DayOneApp : This journaling app allows you to add pictures, local weather data, and geo-location to each journal entry (iOS and Android);
  • MyFitnessPal : This food- and exercise-focused app helps determine the calories and overall nutrition of the food you eat and records your exercise activity (iOS and Android);
  • Headout : This app shares exciting, last-minute deals on fun experiences, including nearby activities, events, and tours. Make sure you make time to rest and relax in addition to all the work (iOS and Android);
  • Coach.me : This app acts as a sort of digital coach by posing powerful questions that will help you narrow down your desires, set goals, and stay open-minded and on track (iOS and Android) (Boss, 2016).

If you’re a fan of podcasts, you might be happy to know that there are plenty of motivation-related podcasts available.

Here’s just a sample of the podcasts out there focused on this topic:

  • The Daily Boost: Best Daily Motivation ( website );
  • The Accidental Creative ( website );
  • Inspire Nation—Daily Inspiration, Motivation, Meditation ( website );
  • The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes ( website );
  • Cortex ( website );
  • The Tony Robbins Podcast ( website );
  • Happier with Gretchen Rubin ( website );
  • Beyond the To Do List—Personal Productivity Perspectives ( website );
  • The Charlene Show ( website );
  • The Ziglar Show—Inspiring Your True Performance ( website );
  • Courageous Self-Confidence ( website ).

Check out other great podcasts that are focused on improving your motivation at https://player.fm/ .

Sometimes you just need a quick boost to get self-motivated, and quotes are a great way to get the spike in motivation that you need. Among this list are 17 quotes collected by Lydia Sweatt (2016). Give these quotes and messages a read next time you’re lacking in motivation.

“The only time you fail is when you fall down and stay down.”
“Most people can motivate themselves to do things simply by knowing that those things need to be done. But not me. For me, motivation is this horrible, scary game where I try to make myself do something while I actively avoid doing it. If I win, I have to do something I don’t want to do. And if I lose, I’m one step closer to ruining my entire life. And I never know whether I’m going to win or lose until the last second.”

Allie Brosh

“Always choose the future over the past. What do we do now?”

Brian Tracy

“You are your master. Only you have the master keys to open the inner locks.”
“Believe in yourself! Have faith in your abilities! Without a humble but reasonable confidence in your own powers you cannot be successful or happy.”

Norman Vincent Peale

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

Walt Disney

“Where there is a will, there is a way. If there is a chance in a million that you can do something, anything to keep what you want from ending, do it. Pry the door open or, if need be, wedge your foot in that door and keep it open.”

Pauline Kael

“Do not wait; the time will never be ‘just right.’ Start where you stand, and work with whatever tools you may have at your command, and better tools will be found as you go along.”

George Herbert

“Press forward. Do not stop, do not linger in your journey, but strive for the mark set before you.”

George Whitefield

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”

Eleanor Roosevelt

“Aim for the moon. If you miss, you may hit a star.”

W. Clement Stone

“Don’t watch the clock; do what it does. Keep going.”

Sam Levenson

“There will be obstacles. There will be doubters. There will be mistakes. But with hard work, there are no limits.”

Michael Phelps

“Keep your eyes on the stars, and your feet on the ground.”

Theodore Roosevelt

“We aim above the mark to hit the mark.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

“One way to keep momentum going is to have constantly greater goals.”

Michael Korda

“Change your life today. Don’t gamble on the future, act now, without delay.”

Simone de Beauvoir

“You just can’t beat the person who never gives up.”
“Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.”

Arthur Ashe

“Why should you continue going after your dreams? Because seeing the look on the faces of the people who said you couldn’t . . . will be priceless.”
“Never give up, for that is just the place and time that the tide will turn.”

Harriet Beecher Stow

Similarly, sometimes a motivational poster, meme, or image can work wonders for your self-motivation. Below are six of my favorite motivation-related images. (Images that are not Creative Commons can be accessed via the links.)

6 Images to Inspire Self-Motivation

The Classic Road Sign

I don’t know about you, but there’s something that calls to me in this image: the blue sky and clouds, the angle encouraging us to look up, and “Motivation” in big letters. For some reason, it just works!

Looking at this image makes me think about life as a journey and motivation as an important piece of that journey. If we want to reach our next destination, we need to put forth some effort to make it happen. And when we do, seeing that big road sign welcoming us can often be reward enough.

The Yes I Can image also points out that the best motivation is self-motivation; as we’ve learned in this piece, that is truly the case. When we are motivated for our own internal reasons and committed to reach our goals for personal fulfillment rather than meeting the standards of others, we are more likely to succeed.

Sometimes, all we need is a quick reminder that “Yes I can!” Keep this image handy, especially when you’re working towards a particularly challenging goal, and it might give you the boost of motivation you need to stay on track.

I Cannot Change Yesterday, But I Can Change Today

The message of this image  is such an important point to remember, especially for those of us who struggle with leaving the past where it belongs: in the past.

It can be all too easy to dwell on past experiences, mistakes you’ve made, and roads that you should have taken. However, that does nothing to improve your current state. It’s good to reflect on what has brought you to where you are today, but letting worry, shame, embarrassment, and self-doubt based on your past creep into your present is a sure recipe for failure.

Remember that yesterday is done and gone—you can’t change it, so there’s no point dwelling on it. Take your lessons learned and apply them to something you can change: today.

What Matters Most Is How You See Yourself

This is another classic image in self-motivation and self-esteem, probably because it has a kitten in it. Kittens make for popular images.

Besides being cute, it also gets an important point across: The most important thing is the view you have of yourself. What other people think simply doesn’t matter most of the time. It’s what you think and feel about yourself that drives your behavior.

If you want to stay motivated and achieve your long-term goals, make sure to work on your sense of self-esteem and self-efficacy. See the best in yourself when you look in the mirror, and you’ll ensure that the best in yourself is what you manifest through your actions.

(Im)possible

This exhilarating (and potentially anxiety-inducing) image reminds us that what seems impossible is sometimes very possible. Of course, some things are truly impossible, based on things like gravity and the laws of nature, but this image isn’t about those things. It’s about things that seem impossible until you actually try them.

Challenge yourself to try something that seems impossible, giving it at least one solid attempt. You may be surprised at the outcome.

Don’t Worry, You Got This

This meme is both adorable and motivational. Featuring a tiny hedgehog in a victorious pose, this is a great image to go to when you’re in need of self-motivation combined with light-heartedness and humor. It can sometimes give a boost that simply can’t be found in more solemn inspirational quotes.

Looking at the cute little hedgehog and telling yourself, “ You got this! ” might be enough to get yourself in the frame of mind to take on a new challenge with enthusiasm and a smile.

If you’re a cinephile, you might find movies a good source of motivation.

If so, this list of 15 motivational movies (along with the movies listed above) might be enough to give you a boost:

  • To Kill a Mockingbird (1962);
  • The Shawshank Redemption (1994);
  • Queen of Katwe (2016);
  • Apollo 13 (1995);
  • The Queen (2006);
  • Lion (2016);
  • Southpaw (2015);
  • The African Queen (1951);
  • Dangal (2016);
  • Field of Dreams (1989);
  • My Life as a Zucchini (2016);
  • The Finest Hours (2016);
  • Begin Again (2013);
  • Sing Street (2016).

To see descriptions of the motivational power of these movies, read Samuel R. Murrian’s (2017) article  here .

Don’t have time for a full-length feature film? That’s okay! There are also tons of great TED Talks and YouTube videos on self-motivation. Check out any of the videos listed below to learn more about self-motivation:

The Psychology of Self-Motivation – Scott Geller

Psychology Professor Scott Gellar (mentioned earlier in this article) explains how to become more self-motivated in this inspiring TEDx Talk.

How Can We Become More Self-Motivated – Kyra G.

Thirteen-year-old Kyra shares in this TEDxYOUTH talk how to be motivated by setting goals and looking up to positive role models.

Self Motivation – Brendan Clark

Another young TEDxYOUTH speaker, Brendan Clark shares his own philosophies on motivation and success in this video.

Of course, there’s always the old-fashioned option to learn more about self-motivation: reading.

Check out these excellent books on self-motivation if you want an in-depth look at the topic:

  • Why We Do What We Do: Understanding Self-Motivation by Edward L. Deci and Richard Flaste ( Amazon );
  • The Self-Motivation Handbook by Jim Cathcart ( Amazon );
  • Self-Theories: Their Role in Motivation, Personality, and Development by Carol Dweck ( Amazon );
  • The Motivation Manifesto by Brendon Burchard ( Amazon );
  • The Motivation Myth: How High Achievers Really Set Themselves Up to Win by Jeff Haden ( Amazon );
  • No Excuses! The Power of Self-Discipline by Brian Tracy ( Amazon );
  • The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives by William Stixrud and Ned Johnson ( Amazon ).

essay on self motivation

17 Tools To Increase Motivation and Goal Achievement

These 17 Motivation & Goal Achievement Exercises [PDF] contain all you need to help others set meaningful goals, increase self-drive, and experience greater accomplishment and life satisfaction.

Created by Experts. 100% Science-based.

In this piece, we covered what self-motivation is, how it fits into similar concepts in psychology, how you can boost it in yourself, and how you can encourage it in others.

It’s possible to increase self-motivation, and in turn, to increase your productivity and success. Hopefully, this article gave you some techniques and tools for achieving this.

What’s your take on self-motivation? What works best for you? Do you find yourself motivated more by external rewards or by internal drives? Did you find that your motivation differs in different areas of life? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

We hope you enjoyed reading this article. Don’t forget to download our three Goal Achievement Exercises for free .

  • Bandura, A., & Schunk, D. H. (1981). Cultivating competence, self-efficacy, and intrinsic interest through proximal self-motivation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 41 , 586-598.
  • Bartholomew, N. G., Dansereau, D. F., & Simpson, D. D. (2006). Getting motivated to change. TCU Institute of Behavioral Research. Retrieved from http://ibr.tcu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/TMA06Sept-mot.pdf
  • Boss, J. (2016). 7 apps to help integrate tech with self-improvement goals. Entrepreneur. Retrieved from https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/254636
  • Buckle, K. (2013). 10 tips for self-motivation for students. Gratia Plena. Retrieved from https://gratiaplenacounseling.org/10-tips-for-self-motivation-for-students/
  • DeMers, J. (2015). 6 motivation secrets to inspire your employees. Inc. Retrieved from https://www.inc.com/jayson-demers/6-motivation-secrets-to-inspire-your-employees.html
  • Ferlazzo, L. (2015). Strategies for helping students motivate themselves. Edutopia. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/strategies-helping-students-motivate-themselves-larry-ferlazzo
  • Geller, E. S. (2016). The psychology of self-motivation. In E. S. Geller (Ed.) Applied Psychology (pp. 83-118). New York, NY, US: Cambridge University Press.
  • Gorbunovs, A., Kapenieks, A., & Cakula, S. (2016). Self-discipline as a key indicator to improve learning outcomes in e-learning environment. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 231 , 245-262. Mantell, M. (2012). Four strategies that build lasting motivation (and how to use them to achieve your goals). LifeHacker. Retrieved from https://lifehacker.com/5958782/four-strategies-that-build-lasting-motivation-and-how-to-use-them-to-achieve-your-goals
  • Mueller, S. (2012). Self-motivation techniques: Proven motivation tactics to boost your motivation. Planet of Success. Retrieved from http://www.planetofsuccess.com/motivationtechniques/
  • Murrian, S. R. (2017). 15 inspiring, uplifting movies you can watch right now on Netflix for a hopeful new year. Parade. Retrieved from https://parade.com/632586/samuelmurrian/15-inspiring-uplifting-movies-you-can-watch-right-now-on-netflix-for-a-hopeful-new-year/
  • Nanton, N., & Dicks, J. W. (2015). 5 steps to keeping your employees—and yourself—motivated daily. Fast Company. Retrieved from https://www.fastcompany.com/3041620/5-steps-to-keeping-your-employees-and-yourself-motivated-daily
  • Skills You Need. (n.d.). Self-motivation. Skills You Need: Personal Skills. Retrieved from https://www.skillsyouneed.com/ps/self-motivation.html
  • Stahl, A. (2016). Seven ways to get motivated at work. Forbes: Leadership. Retrieved from https://www.forbes.com/sites/ashleystahl/2016/11/22/seven-ways-to-get-motivated-at-work/#414d52633cd5
  • Sweatt, L. (2016). 17 motivational quotes to help you achieve your dreams. Success. Retrieved from https://www.success.com/article/17-motivational-quotes-to-help-you-achieve-your-dreams
  • Texeira, P. J., Silva, M. N., Mata, J., Palmeira, A. L., & Markland, D. (2012). International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 9, 22.

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Thank you for the abundance of information.

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This article very helpful for me. For me, intrinsic motivation work for me. Thank you so much to the writer.

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Wow.. wonderful article. Covered all corners .. its so inspirational and insightful.

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thanks alot of information

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Excellent resource and information for all areas of life. I look forward to reading some of the books your listed.

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Thank you so much for this wonderful post. Really great

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This is the one of best example “A man who goes to work every only as a means to pay the bills, keep his family off his back, and please his boss is not self-motivated, while a man who needs no external forces to make the trek into work every day and finds fulfillment in what he does is self-motivated;” Thanks for sharing this helpful post in fast-changing life!

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  • Self-motivation

Table of Contents

Self-motivation is an essential element in achieving success and leading a fulfilling life. It refers to the internal drive that propels individuals to take action toward their goals, even in the face of adversity or challenges. Cultivating techniques for-self motivation help individuals foster a sense of purpose, unleash their creativity, and enhance their adaptability in different domains of life.

What is Self-Motivation?

Self-motivation is a valuable skill that enables individuals to drive themselves toward achieving their goals without any external influence.

It involves controlling the inner drive and determination that comes from an individual’s values, beliefs, interests, and past experiences of success and accomplishments. Self-motivation skills can also inspire and influence others, by drawing a strong sense of drive and purpose in their life.

Scholars and researchers in various fields, including psychology, education, and organizational behavior, have studied the concept of self-motivation over time.

Abraham Maslow 1  Liu, Z., Xiang, J., Luo, F., Hu, X., & Luo, P. (2022). The Study of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Theory in the Doctor-Nurse Integration Teaching Method on Clinical Interns.  Journal of healthcare engineering ,  2022 , 6388068. https://doi.org/10.1155/2022/6388068 , an American psychologist, proposed one of the earliest and most influential motivation theories, which highlights the innate drive individuals possess to achieve personal growth and realize their full potential through inner motivation.

The self-determination theory 2  Patrick, H., & Williams, G. C. (2012). Self-determination theory: its application to health behavior and complementarity with motivational interviewing.  The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity ,  9 , 18. https://doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-9-18 is another crucial notion that suggests that self-motivation is heightened when individuals feel a sense of control over their actions and a connection to others who share similar goals and interests. By understanding the concept of self-motivation and developing the skills to harness it, individuals can push toward excellence, even in the face of obstacles or setbacks.

Examples of Self-Motivation

Self-motivation can be cultivated by:

  • Encouraging oneself with positive self-talk 3 Tod, D., Hardy, J., & Oliver, E. (2011). Effects of self-talk: a systematic review.  Journal of sport & exercise psychology ,  33 (5), 666–687. https://doi.org/10.1123/jsep.33.5.666
  • Setting specific, measurable goals
  • Celebrating momentary successes 4 Hart, W., & Albarracín, D. (2009). The effects of chronic achievement motivation and achievement primes on the activation of achievement and fun goals.  Journal of personality and social psychology ,  97 (6), 1129–1141. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0017146 along the way
  • Developing a consistent routine and committing to it
  • Surrounding oneself with positivity, whether it be through supportive people or uplifting content
  • Incorporating physical activity 5 Brophy, S., Cooksey, R., Davies, H., Dennis, M. S., Zhou, S. M., & Siebert, S. (2013). The effect of physical activity and motivation on function in ankylosing spondylitis: a cohort study.  Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism ,  42 (6), 619–626. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.semarthrit.2012.09.007 into one’s routine to boost energy levels and mental clarity
  • Pursuing activities 6 Chen, M., Xue, S., & Shi, Y. (2018). Leisure activities and leisure motivations of Chinese residents.  PloS one ,  13 (11), e0206740. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0206740 that align with one’s passions and interests.

Characteristics of a Highly Self-motivated Person

Individuals who possess a high degree of self-motivation have specific traits that enable them to stay focused and achieve their objectives. Some of the essential characteristics of highly self-motivated people are:

  • An optimistic attitude 7 Conversano, C., Rotondo, A., Lensi, E., Della Vista, O., Arpone, F., & Reda, M. A. (2010). Optimism and its impact on mental and physical well-being.  Clinical practice and epidemiology in mental health : CP & EMH ,  6 , 25–29. https://doi.org/10.2174/1745017901006010025 toward life, allows them to approach challenges with resilience and hope.
  • The ability to organize and manage their time and resources effectively, allowing them to prioritize tasks and remain productive.
  • A persistent and determined mindset enables them to push through setbacks.
  • A clear understanding of their strengths and weaknesses, allows them to leverage their strengths while addressing their weaknesses.
  • A desire to continuously improve and develop themselves, taking on new challenges and learning new skills.

Why is self-motivation essential in life?

Self-motivation plays a crucial role in achieving both success and happiness in life. Here are five reasons why is self-motivation important:

1. Creates a Sense of Purpose

Self-motivation helps individuals to identify their purpose 8  Sutin, A. R., Luchetti, M., Stephan, Y., & Terracciano, A. (2022). Sense of purpose in life and motivation, barriers, and engagement in physical activity and sedentary behavior: Test of a mediational model.  Journal of health psychology ,  27 (9), 2068–2078. https://doi.org/10.1177/13591053211021661 and goals in life, providing them with a clear direction and sense of meaning.

2. Fosters Creativity

Individuals with self-motivation are often more creative and innovative 9  Oleynick, V. C., Thrash, T. M., LeFew, M. C., Moldovan, E. G., & Kieffaber, P. D. (2014). The scientific study of inspiration in the creative process: challenges and opportunities.  Frontiers in human neuroscience ,  8 , 436. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2014.00436 , as they are not bound by external constraints and can think outside the box.

3. Promotes Adaptability

Self-motivated individuals are better equipped to adapt to changing 10  Ybarra O. (2023). The skills that help employees adapt: Empirical validation of a four-category framework.  PloS one ,  18 (2), e0282074. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0282074 circumstances and overcome obstacles, as they can maintain a positive attitude and persevere through challenges.

4. Improves Relationships

Self-motivation can lead to healthier and more positive relationships 11  Okello, D. R., & Gilson, L. (2015). Exploring the influence of trust relationships on motivation in the health sector: a systematic review.  Human resources for health ,  13 , 16. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12960-015-0007-5 with others. It helps people to become more assertive in their communication with others, leading to better understanding and more effective communication, which can help build stronger relationships.

5. Encourages Risk-taking

Self-motivation can empower individuals to take calculated risks 12  Li, M., Lauharatanahirun, N., Steinberg, L., King-Casas, B., Kim-Spoon, J., & Deater-Deckard, K. (2019). Longitudinal link between trait motivation and risk-taking behaviors via neural risk processing.  Developmental cognitive neuroscience ,  40 , 100725. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2019.100725 in pursuit of personal fulfillment and growth, leading to greater confidence and a broader range of experiences.

Elements of Self-Motivation

The elements of self-motivation refer to the factors or components that contribute to an individual’s ability to motivate themselves for achieving their goals.

Here are some points explaining the different elements of self-motivation:

1. Visualization

Visualizing oneself to achieve 13  Blankert, T., & Hamstra, M. R. (2017). Imagining Success: Multiple Achievement Goals and the Effectiveness of Imagery.  Basic and applied social psychology ,  39 (1), 60–67. https://doi.org/10.1080/01973533.2016.1255947 the desired outcome can help in building motivation, confidence, and focus.

2. Self-reflection

Reflecting on one’s experiences 14  Pillny, M., Krkovic, K., Buck, L., & Lincoln, T. M. (2022). From Memories of Past Experiences to Present Motivation? A Meta-analysis on the Association Between Episodic Memory and Negative Symptoms in People With Psychosis.  Schizophrenia bulletin ,  48 (2), 307–324. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbab120 , strengths, weaknesses, and progress helps in identifying areas of improvement, setting new goals, and staying motivated.

3. Self-belief

Believing in one’s abilities, skills, and potential helps in overcoming obstacles, taking risks 15  Bayat, B., Akbarisomar, N., Tori, N. A., & Salehiniya, H. (2019). The relation between self-confidence and risk-taking among the students.  Journal of education and health promotion ,  8 , 27. https://doi.org/10.4103/jehp.jehp_174_18 , and pursuing challenging goals is considered to be one of the crucial factors of self-motivation.

4. Self-discipline

Developing self-discipline 16  Claver, F., Martínez-Aranda, L. M., Conejero, M., & Gil-Arias, A. (2020). Motivation, Discipline, and Academic Performance in Physical Education: A Holistic Approach From Achievement Goal and Self-Determination Theories.  Frontiers in psychology ,  11 , 1808. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01808 and self-control helps in avoiding distractions, staying focused, and following through with commitments.

5. Persistence

Persisting towards one’s goals 17  Moyers, T. B., & Rollnick, S. (2002). A motivational interviewing perspective on resistance in psychotherapy.  Journal of clinical psychology ,  58 (2), 185–193. https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.1142 , despite setbacks and obstacles, and learning from failures helps to develop self-motivation.

Types of Motivators

Understanding different types of motivators can help individuals to identify their source motivation and create strategies to sustain it for achieving goals. Here are the two most common types of motivators:

1. Intrinsic Motivators

Intrinsic motivators refer to the internal drive 18  Di Domenico, S. I., & Ryan, R. M. (2017). The Emerging Neuroscience of Intrinsic Motivation: A New Frontier in Self-Determination Research.  Frontiers in human neuroscience ,  11 , 145. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00145 or desire that comes from within an individual to perform a certain behavior or activity. Intrinsic motivators can be very powerful and long-lasting.

Examples include the desire for personal growth, the sense of accomplishment, and the satisfaction to do a job well.

2. Extrinsic Motivators

This refers to external factors 19  Ramirez-Andreotta, M. D., Tapper, A., Clough, D., Carrera, J. S., & Sandhaus, S. (2019). Understanding the Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivations Associated with Community Gardening to Improve Environmental Public Health Prevention and Intervention.  International journal of environmental research and public health ,  16 (3), 494. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030494 that drive individuals to perform a certain behavior or activity. These motivators are usually tied to rewards or recognition from outside the individual.

Examples include money, promotions, awards, public recognition, etc.     

Self-motivation and Mental Health

Self-motivation can have both positive and negative effects on our mental health, depending on how it is experienced and expressed. Here are some examples:

Positive Effects

1. sense of control.

When people are self-motivated, they feel a greater sense of control 20  Yahya J. (2021). Breaking Beyond the Borders of the Brain: Self-Control as a Situated Ability.  Frontiers in psychology ,  12 , 617434. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.617434 over their lives. This can help reduce feelings of anxiety and stress, as individuals feel empowered to take action and make positive changes.

2. Resilience

Self-motivation can help us build greater resilience 21  Whitfield, K. M., & Wilby, K. J. (2021). Developing Grit, Motivation, and Resilience: To Give Up on Giving In.  Pharmacy (Basel, Switzerland) ,  9 (2), 109. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9020109 and cope with challenges more effectively. When people are motivated, they are better able to bounce back from setbacks and stay focused on their goals, even in the face of adversity.

Read More About Resilience Here

3. Better Mental Health Outcomes

Studies have shown that self-motivation is linked to better mental health 22  Sheehan, R. B., Herring, M. P., & Campbell, M. J. (2018). Associations Between Motivation and Mental Health in Sport: A Test of the Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation.  Frontiers in psychology ,  9 , 707. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00707 outcomes, including lower rates of depression and anxiety.

Negative Effects

1. pressure and stress.

When people are over-motivated, they may put too much pressure 23  Yang, M., Viladrich, C., & Cruz, J. (2022). Examining the relationship between academic stress and motivation toward physical education within a semester: A two-wave study with Chinese secondary school students.  Frontiers in psychology ,  13 , 965690. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2022.965690 on themselves to achieve their goals. This can lead to negative mental health outcomes, such as feelings of stress and burnout.

Read More About Stress Here

2. Obsession and Addiction

When self-motivation turns into an obsession, an individual may become overly occupied with a particular goal or behavior. Some individuals may exhibit addictive-like behaviors 24  Koob, G. F., & Volkow, N. D. (2016). Neurobiology of addiction: a neurocircuitry analysis.  The lancet. Psychiatry ,  3 (8), 760–773. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2215-0366(16)00104-8 such as working excessively long hours, neglecting their personal lives and relationships, or engaging in risky or unhealthy behaviors to maintain their productivity.

Read More About Addiction Here

3. Perfectionism

Self-motivation can sometimes lead to perfectionism, where individuals set impossibly high standards 25  Vicent, M., Sanmartín, R., Vásconez-Rubio, O., & García-Fernández, J. M. (2020). Perfectionism Profiles and Motivation to Exercise Based on Self-Determination Theory.  International journal of environmental research and public health ,  17 (9), 3206. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093206 for themselves and are never satisfied with their achievements. This can lead to a negative impact on mental health such as feelings of frustration and stress.

Read More About Perfectionism Here

Effects of Lack of Self-motivation  

Maintaining motivation and enthusiasm to achieve one’s objectives in challenging situations can be difficult. Lack of self-motivation can have a significant impact on an individual’s life, impeding one’s ability to reach their targets, pursue interests, and lead fulfilling lives.

A lack of self-motivation can lead to:

1. Procrastination

Without self-motivation, individuals may be more likely to put off important tasks or avoid taking action 26  Beutel, M. E., Klein, E. M., Aufenanger, S., Brähler, E., Dreier, M., Müller, K. W., Quiring, O., Reinecke, L., Schmutzer, G., Stark, B., & Wölfling, K. (2016). Procrastination, Distress and Life Satisfaction across the Age Range – A German Representative Community Study.  PloS one ,  11 (2), e0148054. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0148054 altogether. This can lead to a sense of overwhelm and a cycle of inactivity.

Read More About Procrastination Here

2. Low Productivity

It can be challenging to stay focused and productive without self-motivation. People may struggle to get things done or take longer to complete tasks, which can affect their work performance 27  Lohela-Karlsson, M., Jensen, I., & Björklund, C. (2022). Do Attitudes towards Work or Work Motivation Affect Productivity Loss among Academic Employees?.  International journal of environmental research and public health ,  19 (2), 934. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19020934 or personal goals.

3. Lack of Achievement

When individuals lack self-motivation, they may find it challenging to achieve 28  Hart, W., & Albarracín, D. (2009). The effects of chronic achievement motivation and achievement primes on the activation of achievement and fun goals.  Journal of personality and social psychology ,  97 (6), 1129–1141. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0017146 their goals or pursue their passions, leading to a sense of frustration or regret.

4. Poor Self-esteem

A lack of self-motivation can also affect one’s self-esteem 29  van der Kaap-Deeder, J., Wouters, S., Verschueren, K., Briers, V., Deeren, B., & Vansteenkiste, M. (2016). The Pursuit of Self-Esteem and Its Motivational Implications.  Psychologica Belgica ,  56 (2), 143–168. https://doi.org/10.5334/pb.277 and confidence. People may feel like they’re not living up to their potential or that they’re not capable of achieving their goals. This can lead to self-doubt and low self-worth.

Read More About Self-Esteem Here

5. Decreased Happiness

Ultimately, a lack of self-motivation can impact an individual’s overall happiness 30  Esch T. (2022). The ABC Model of Happiness-Neurobiological Aspects of Motivation and Positive Mood, and Their Dynamic Changes through Practice, the Course of Life.  Biology ,  11 (6), 843. https://doi.org/10.3390/biology11060843 and sense of fulfillment. Without the drive and passion to pursue their goals and dreams, they may feel unfulfilled or unsatisfied with their lives.

How to Increase Self-motivation

Here are six effective tips for self-motivation that can help an individual to get started:

1. Set Specific Goals

Clear and concise goals can help you focus and stay motivated 31  Fang, H., He, B., Fu, H., Zhang, H., Mo, Z., & Meng, L. (2018). A Surprising Source of Self-Motivation: Prior Competence Frustration Strengthens One’s Motivation to Win in Another Competence-Supportive Activity.  Frontiers in human neuroscience ,  12 , 314. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2018.00314 . Break down larger goals into smaller, achievable steps to keep yourself on track.

2. Establish a Routine

A consistent routine can help you develop positive habits 32  van der Weiden, A., Benjamins, J., Gillebaart, M., Ybema, J. F., & de Ridder, D. (2020). How to Form Good Habits? A Longitudinal Field Study on the Role of Self-Control in Habit Formation.  Frontiers in psychology ,  11 , 560. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.00560 and increase productivity. Whether it’s a morning routine to kick-start your day or a set schedule for work or exercise, find a routine that works for you.

3. Identify Your Why

Understanding the reasons behind your goals 33  Manton, K. J., Gauld, C. S., White, K. M., Griffin, P. M., & Elliott, S. L. (2019). Qualitative study investigating the underlying motivations of healthy participants in phase I clinical trials.  BMJ open ,  9 (1), e024224. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024224 and aspirations can provide a powerful source of motivation. Connect with your values and motivations regularly to stay inspired.

4. Focus on Progress, Not Perfection

Perfectionism can lead to feelings of self-doubt and procrastination. Instead, focus on incremental progress 34  Höchli, B., Brügger, A., & Messner, C. (2018). How Focusing on Superordinate Goals Motivates Broad, Long-Term Goal Pursuit: A Theoretical Perspective.  Frontiers in psychology ,  9 , 1879. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01879 and celebrate small victories along the way.

5. Reward Yourself

Celebrate your achievements, no matter how small. Rewards 35  Liu, Y., Yang, Y., Bai, X., Chen, Y., & Mo, L. (2022). Do Immediate External Rewards Really Enhance Intrinsic Motivation?.  Frontiers in psychology ,  13 , 853879. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2022.853879 can motivate you to continue making progress toward your goals.

6. Surround Yourself with Positivity

Surrounding yourself with positive people 36  Horowitz L. G. (1985). The self-care motivation model: theory and practice in healthy human development.  The Journal of school health ,  55 (2), 57–61. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1746-1561.1985.tb04079.x , messages, and environments can increase your mood and motivation. Seek out supportive friends and family members, read inspiring books or articles or create a workspace that inspires you.

Self-motivation nearly affects every facet of our lives. Therefore, maintaining realistic goals, practicing self-care, and focusing on positive outcomes are of utmost need to lead a fulfilling life.

At A Glance

  • Self-motivation is a key factor in achieving success and fulfillment in all areas of our lives.
  • Examples of self-motivation include pursuing personal goals, seeking new challenges, and finding inspiration within oneself.
  • Self-motivation is important in life because it helps individuals achieve their targets, and fulfill their potential which leads to a fruitful life.
  • It can positively impact our mental health, providing a sense of purpose and control, and developing strength.
  • It is important to cultivate healthy self-motivation to avoid negative outcomes such as stress, burnout, and addiction.
  • Some effective techniques for self-motivation include prioritizing self-care, striving for balance in all aspects of life, and setting realistic and achievable goals.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. how does self-motivation influence self-concept.

Self-motivation can positively influence self-concept by fostering a sense of competence, achievement, and control over one’s life.

2. Is self-motivation an attitude?

Self-motivation can be considered an attitude as it involves having a positive mindset and internal drive to achieve one’s goals.

3. Are people born with self-motivation?

While some people may have a natural inclination towards self-motivation, it is primarily a learned skill that can be developed and improved over time.

4. What is the power of self-motivation?

The power of self-motivation lies in its ability to push individuals towards achieving their goals, even in the face of obstacles and setbacks, ultimately leading to personal growth and success.

5. What causes lack of self-motivation?

Lack of self-motivation can be caused by various factors, such as fear of failure, lack of direction, low self-confidence, and lack of interest or passion in the task at hand.

6. How does self-motivation affect mental health?

Self-motivation can have a positive impact on mental health by promoting feelings of accomplishment, purpose, and self-esteem, and reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety.

References:

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  • 32  van der Weiden, A., Benjamins, J., Gillebaart, M., Ybema, J. F., & de Ridder, D. (2020). How to Form Good Habits? A Longitudinal Field Study on the Role of Self-Control in Habit Formation.  Frontiers in psychology ,  11 , 560. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.00560
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11 examples of self-motivation, 4 elements of self-motivation, why is self-motivation so important at work, how to show self-motivation in a job interview, what causes demotivation in the workplace, how to show self-motivation at work, something to remember: the importance of obligation.

If you’re wondering how you can achieve your goals and get inspired, self-motivation examples can help. 

The thing is, motivated people, don't just wake up in the morning and drink motivation juice. Like most of us, they probably drink coffee — but that isn’t their secret. Staying motivated takes hard work, a positive attitude , and a lot of focus. 

We can find examples of self-motivation everywhere. Think about it: To complete tasks and do your goal-setting, you need motivation. Something gets you out of bed in the morning, convinces you to turn on your coffee maker, and helps you choose an outfit. 

That might be your job, your family, or your desire to work out. And while sometimes that motivation is hard to find, we depend on it to succeed in life. 

We all need to fine-tune our motivation skills and become self-motivated to achieve our goals. We’re here to show you why self-motivation is important, some self-motivation examples, how to improve motivation at work, and more. Let's go.

Motivation is behind what you do every day. It pushes you to go to work and hit the gym. Your motivation also pushes you to accomplish your goals and complete your everyday tasks . It helps you to find your passions and learn how to manage yourself .

You should know that there are two main types of motivation : intrinsic and extrinsic. Intrinsic motivation is all about what we want to do and relates to our values and interests — typically, self-motivation is intrinsic. Extrinsic motivation makes us act because there are external factors like rewards at stake. These rewards can be things like good grades and earning money. 

When it comes to learning , motivation is extra important. Studies have actually found that extrinsic motivation can sometimes undermine our intrinsic motivators . But without intrinsic motivations, our rewards don't always motivate us.

For example, we won't grasp the purpose of a lesson in school or a course without an internal reason. Intrinsic motivation leads to enhanced learning, creativity, wellness, and more . 

What rewards are most effective also depends on our interests or values. If we had to take a course on a subject we didn’t like, a reward of a passing grade might not be enough incentive to motivate us . But if it’s a subject we love, we’ll be inspired to learn and achieve a high grade.

What's fun about self-motivation is that it can come in all forms. It’s not just useful for our personal goals , either. Self-motivation is everywhere. However, since it covers such a broad array of areas, it's helpful to have some examples of what self-motivation is.

Here are 11 examples of self-motivation for you to think about:

  • Tidying up your room when things get messy because you want it to be organized and calming
  • Washing your dishes right after you use them because it’ll make your space clean
  • Watering the flowers in your backyard because you’ll see how much your plants grow
  • Helping your mom out with some chores without her asking because it’ll make you feel productive and supportive
  • Working through a disagreement with your partner calmly because you want to be on the same page 
  • Helping to boost your friend's self-esteem because you want to see them thrive
  • Starting your workday on time each day because you want to create a structured routine and finish on time
  • Volunteering to help out on extra projects at work because you’re happy to help where you can
  • Remaining focused at work and avoiding social media because you know that social media tends to drain your energy
  • Pointing out problems and providing solutions on projects because you want your work to succeed
  • Working out to boost your mood because you value physical activity

Self-motivation doesn't happen as a result of wishful thinking. It happens when four important elements work together at the same time. If we have one but not the other, we'll be missing important parts of what it means to be motivated.

Here are the four elements of self-motivation:

1. Personal drive to accomplish your goals

When we discuss this element, it's all about mindset. We can have two types of mindsets: a fixed mindset or a growth mindset . With a fixed mindset, we believe that we can't change or improve, and the skills we have now are the only ones we'll ever have.

A growth mindset, on the other hand, invites challenges. It welcomes the opportunity to learn new skills , grow, and improve ourselves. A growth mindset is key when it comes to motivation.

Woman-looking-up-and-smiling-self-motivation-examples

2. A balance of optimism and resilience

Resilience is all about thinking of ways to turn negative events around. We need to think rationally and logically about our obstacles to overcome them. Our optimism is there to help out with that. It helps us develop a positive attitude and still believe in ourselves. Resiliency helps us bounce back, but optimism helps our well-being .

3. Commitment level to your goals

Our goals should be connected to our core values and what we can do to live meaningful lives. But it's not always easy to point those things out. If you find that your commitment level to your goals is poor, you might need to evaluate them.

If they’re unrealistic, you may be discouraged or disappointed when you can’t achieve them. Make sure you’re committed to reasonable, authentic goals. Try setting SMART goals to stay motivated.

4. Taking the initiative to work hard

Your dreams and goals aren't going to be achieved by anyone except yourself. Taking the initiative to put in hard work and remain focused is important if we want to stay motivated.

Sometimes we have to face things we don't want to that might be difficult, but that doesn't mean they aren't worth it. Our initiative can also bring us positive opportunities. These will allow us to experience things that wouldn't have happened unless we worked for them.

It can be challenging to remain committed to your goals all by yourself. BetterUp can help sustain your motivation levels as you continue your hard work to be your best self.

Portrait-of-businesswoman-smiling-in-meeting-self-motivation-examples

Why is self-motivation important in the workplace, and why should we set goals for self-improvement anyways? Well, for many reasons, actually. 

One of them is that we should be bringing our whole selves to work . If you have motivation outside of work, why not bring it with you to the office? Our work values will help dictate our ability to stay intrinsically motivated in the workplace. 

However, if you can’t find the spark, it might be time for a career change . Finding a job that fulfills your purpose and aligns with your values will improve your overall well-being. Plus, it’ll help you motivate yourself.

Feeling like we're making progress and accomplishing things at the end of the day is great. Your boss isn't going to tell you that you're doing good work for nothing, so we have to put effort into our jobs. When we have to do some teamwork to complete tasks, we might also rely on our motivation to get us through it if we're used to working independently. 

Motivation at work is important for business reasons as well. Studies have shown that workplaces with engaged, interested, and motivated employees are up to 43% more productive . If you aren’t interested in your work, it’s harder to do it — and do it well. 

Plus, Gallup found that in 2021, only 35% of US employees were engaged with their work . Of the disengaged employees, 74% said they were actively looking for new work . Motivation and engagement help keep employee turnover rates low and the quality of work high.

A job interview is a great place to give examples of your self-motivation. Hiring managers want to see that you're interested in the work, value what you'd be doing, and don't need to constantly be told what to do. Make sure you answer your interview questions thoughtfully and in alignment with the job description. 

Group-of-people-sitting-waiting-before-job-interview-self-motivation-examples

Here are eight examples of describing self-motivation in a job interview:

  • Talk about when you did great work because of your passion
  • Give an example of when and how you overcame an obstacle independently 
  • Mention your strong work ethic 
  • Describe with personal anecdotes how self-motivation is a core trait of yours
  • Stay optimistic with your answers
  • Avoid one-word answers or examples with external motivators 
  • Give an example that displays your commitment and resilience
  • Admit when you've made mistakes, but highlight how they taught you important things

Knowing how to handle a motivation problem is difficult when you don't know what causes it. To keep people inspired at work and boost their motivation , it's important to identify what might cause these things to decline.

Let's review the five potential causes of employee demotivation at work:

  • They're bored: When employees aren't passionate about what they're doing, they won't have a sense of accomplishment even after reaching their goals.
  • They lack confidence: Without a strong leader setting a good example, employees might not know what healthy motivation looks like.
  • They feel unappreciated: Employees who know that their efforts are valued and appreciated will work better than those who don't feel like their actions matter.
  • They lack growth opportunities: If people know that they don't have anything else to learn or ways to grow, they won't sustain their motivation levels.
  • External issues: We all have lives outside of work . The problems we face in our personal lives can carry over and impact how we work professionally.

If you already have plenty of self-motivation or want to flex your newly developed skill, there are a few good ways to do that. You can demonstrate that you're a self-motivated employee to your team members and managers with a few tips.

Portrait-of-businessman-at-work-self-motivation-examples

Give one of these six ideas a try next time you're at work:

  • Smile and greet your team in the mornings
  • Share suggestions on projects and listen to feedback
  • Take the initiative on projects, especially when nobody else will
  • Participate in professional events that are outside of your working office
  • Inquire into career development opportunities
  • Put in the effort to become a better leader

We've discussed self-motivation examples, why self-motivation is important, and how we can demonstrate it at work. But one last thing we're going to highlight is an obligation . It's not a type of motivation that's necessarily intrinsic or extrinsic, but it still influences us to act. 

When we feel obligated to do things, it can be from our sense of duty, ethics, and values. Our obligations can still show us how to be disciplined and follow a set routine that gets things done.

Turning your to-do list into a series of obligations might take away from the fun, but it will help you stay loyal to what you need to do. And no matter where our motivation comes from, our actions matter. Goal-setting requires us to be driven, committed, optimistic and resilient. 

We have to take the initiative when needed. Our self-motivation and sense of obligation also carry over to our professional lives. These are both important traits to demonstrate in our jobs. And they’re important to convey when we're looking for a new one. 

Next time you set your intentions and make a plan of action , don't forget your motivation. 

Find someone to help you stay accountable as you try to sustain your motivation. At BetterUp , we can help you track your progress and goal setting so that you continue to learn new skills.

Cultivate a growth mindset

Ignite your motivation and build a growth mindset. Our coaches give you the tools to overcome challenges and achieve your goals.

Maggie Wooll, MBA

Maggie Wooll is a researcher, author, and speaker focused on the evolving future of work. Formerly the lead researcher at the Deloitte Center for the Edge, she holds a Bachelor of Science in Education from Princeton University and an MBA from the University of Virginia Darden School of Business. Maggie is passionate about creating better work and greater opportunities for all.

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Student Essays

Essay on Self Motivation

3 Best Essays on Self Motivation – Key to Success – 2024

Self motivation is essentially important in our life. During the different phases of our life, we come across many ups and downs of life. There’s only power of self motivation that help us to stand out with resilience, courage and commitment. The following essay on Self motivation mentions the meaning, purpose & importance of self motivation, additionally it details how to have self motivation in life for greater purpose in life

Essay on Self Motivation | Meaning, Purpose of Self Motivation in Life

Self motivation is simply the act of motivating oneself. But what exactly does it entail? Self motivation affects everything you do in life, from waking up early in the morning to complete your daily tasks, to studying hard for that upcoming exam, to working out at the gym when you are tired and just want to chill on the couch with a bag of chips. Self motivation is what makes you accomplish your goals and reach your full potential as a human being, and with it we can truly be unstoppable!

Essay on Self Motivation

Self Motivation is the Key to Success

Motivation in life can come in different forms, it may be purely materialistic like wanting money or a nice fancy car to make you feel cooler, or it may be something that relates more to your life’s purpose like wanting to help others.

It’s a great way to perseverance and consistency in life. Self motivation comes in all shapes and sizes, but what is important to remember is that it is completely unique to you. The best kind of self motivation comes from within, and requires a lot of introspection and soul searching to really understand what it is that truly motivates you.

How to Stay Self Motivated

So how do we give ourselves that necessary push to motivate ourselves? Here are some tips on how you can become more self motivated:

  • Wake up early. Like, as early as 5 am if you can manage it (or even earlier if you’re really hardcore). There’s a reason why all successful people seem to be early risers.
  • Plan your day the night before, and write it on a note on your wall, on your desktop background, or in some other place you will see everyday. A day planner also works very well if it is the kind that you carry around with you to remind yourself of what you should be doing at any given time.
  • Make a schedule for yourself, and include all the tasks you need to accomplish for that day. This will make it easier to do everything on time, without forgetting anything, and will keep you on track with your goals.
  • Take small steps to success. You don’t have to wake up early and immediately start running 10 kilometers. Just get up, have a shower and breakfast, and start studying or working out. Once you get used to it you will be able to do it without even thinking about it.
  • Once you start feeling tired or lazy, try doing some exercise or stretching. This will get your blood going and you’ll feel energized after that. Also, drinking a lot of water throughout the day will keep you hydrated and feeling good.
  • Remember: A new day will always begin after just one night! So don’t feel bad about the things you didn’t accomplish yesterday, because there’s always a chance to start all over again.
  • Make your goals SMART. Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Time-bound goals will make it easier to stay motivated. For example, instead of saying “I will go to the gym three times a week”, saying “I will go to the gym every day from Monday through Friday at 5 pm” will make your goals more specific and measurable.
  • Find a workout buddy. Someone who is going to be able to push you to do your best and motivate you if you happen to slack off.
  • Listen to music while at the gym, cooking, studying or doing homework. Or watching a movie if you’re procrastinating on your studies. Music has the power to change our mood and can motivate us immensely!
  • Treat yourself, but in moderation. Buy yourself a new top if you’ve been good this week and have met your goals, or if you’re having a good day, but don’t reward yourself with that expensive ice cream or chocolate cake if you’ve been slacking off. Treating yourself is a good incentive to stay motivated, but don’t let it become too much of a crutch.

As human beings, we are all motivated by different things. It’s a way to self respect and courage.  It is completely natural to not be motivated about certain tasks at certain times, but what is important is that you are aware of what it is that motivates you, and then use these motivations to your advantage. Find your motivation!

Essay on Motivation For Students:

Motivation is the driving force that enables individuals to achieve their goals and dreams. It is what pushes us to take action, even when faced with challenges and setbacks. For students, motivation plays a crucial role in their academic success. A motivated student has the desire and determination to learn and excel in their studies.

In today’s fast-paced world, where distractions are everywhere, it can be challenging for students to stay motivated constantly. However, there are several strategies that students can use to boost their motivation levels.

Setting Clear Goals

Having clear goals is essential for maintaining motivation. When students have a specific target or objective in mind, they are more likely to put in the effort and work towards achieving it. These goals can be short-term or long-term, and they should be challenging yet realistic. By setting clear goals, students can see the progress they are making, which can further motivate them to keep going.

Focusing on Intrinsic Motivation

Intrinsic motivation refers to the internal desire and enjoyment that comes from learning and mastering a subject. It is different from extrinsic motivation, which involves external rewards such as grades or praise from others.

While extrinsic motivators can be helpful, relying solely on them can lead to a decrease in motivation once the reward is no longer present. On the other hand, intrinsic motivation provides a more sustainable source of drive for students.

Creating a Positive Learning Environment

The environment in which students learn plays a significant role in their motivation levels. A positive learning environment is one that promotes collaboration, creativity, and growth. It should also be a safe space where students feel comfortable taking risks and making mistakes without fear of judgment or criticism.

When students are in a positive environment, they are more likely to engage with the material and stay motivated throughout the learning process.

Taking Breaks and Practicing Self-Care

While working hard towards their goals is essential, students must also remember to take breaks and practice self-care. Burnout can quickly occur when students push themselves too hard without giving themselves time to rest and recharge. By taking breaks, students can come back to their studies feeling refreshed and energized, which can boost their motivation levels.

Finding Support

Having a support system can be invaluable for students’ motivation. Whether it’s from family, friends, or teachers, having people who believe in them and their abilities can provide the encouragement and support they need during tough times. Additionally, joining study groups or finding a mentor in their field of interest can also be beneficial for students.

Overall, motivation is crucial for students to reach their full potential. By setting clear goals, focusing on intrinsic motivation, creating a positive learning environment, taking breaks and practicing self-care, and finding support, students can maintain their drive to succeed academically. With determination and perseverance, anything is possible for motivated students

Essay on Self Motivation For Students:

Motivation is the driving force that helps individuals achieve their goals and overcome challenges. It is a key ingredient to success in life, especially for students who face academic pressure and personal responsibilities. However, motivation is not something that magically appears; it requires constant effort and self-motivation to stay motivated. In this essay, we will discuss the importance of self-motivation for students and provide tips on how to foster it.

Why Is Self-Motivation Important For Students?

Self-motivation is crucial for students as it enables them to achieve academic excellence, build valuable skills, and become successful individuals. Here are some reasons why self-motivation is essential for students:

  • Academic Success: Students who are self-motivated have a strong desire to learn and excel in their studies. They set high goals for themselves and work tirelessly towards achieving them, even when faced with obstacles or setbacks.
  • Personal Growth: Self-motivation helps students develop important life skills such as time management, discipline, and perseverance. These skills not only benefit them in their academic pursuits but also prepare them for future challenges in their personal and professional lives.
  • Self-Confidence: When students are self-motivated, they believe in their abilities and have a positive attitude towards learning. This confidence can help them overcome any self-doubt or fear of failure, leading to better performance and higher levels of achievement.
  • Sense of Purpose: Self-motivation helps students identify their goals and align their efforts towards achieving them. This sense of purpose can give meaning to their academic journey and keep them focused on the bigger picture.

Tips for Fostering Self-Motivation

Here are some practical tips that can help students cultivate self-motivation:

  • Set Clear Goals: Having specific, achievable goals is essential for staying motivated. Students should set both short-term and long-term goals, with actionable steps to work towards them.
  • Find Your Why: It is crucial for students to understand why they are pursuing a particular goal or studying a certain subject. Knowing their motivations can help them stay committed during challenging times.
  • Celebrate Small Wins: Celebrating even the smallest achievements can provide students with a sense of accomplishment and motivation to keep going.
  • Create a Support System: Having a support system of friends, family, or mentors can help students stay motivated. They can offer encouragement, share experiences, and provide helpful advice when needed.
  • Take Breaks: It is essential for students to take breaks and recharge their energy levels. This can prevent burnout and help them maintain a healthy work-life balance.

Self-motivation is the key to success for students. It helps them overcome challenges, achieve their goals, and develop important life skills along the way. By setting clear goals, finding their why, celebrating small wins, creating a support system, and taking breaks when needed, students can foster self-motivation and excel in their academic and personal pursuits.

Remember, motivation is not something that can be given or taken; it comes from within, and with the right mindset, anyone can cultivate it. So, stay motivated and reach for your dreams!

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Mary Sharp: The Self Motivated Student by Mary

Maryof Julian's entry into Varsity Tutor's March 2014 scholarship contest

Mary Sharp: The Self Motivated Student by Mary - March 2014 Scholarship Essay

I consider self motivation my greatest academic achievement. My self motivation has had a positive impact on my life. Self motivation has allowed me to be an independent learner. I set due dates for myself, and I push myself to my full potential. Self motivation is ultimately the greatest academic achievement. A good grade, a high score, a blue ribbon on a science fair project; all these things are events that come and go. Thirty years from now I will have lost that report card, a high score will not matter, and that blue ribbon will be buried in a box somewhere, forgotten. Self motivation is a skill that will stick with me the rest of my life. No matter what job I have, no matter how old I am, self motivation will allow me to excel in any area of life.

I have been educated at home since I was in kindergarten. The first few years of my schooling my mom taught me using several different curriculums designed for homeschool students. From third grade to ninth grade I was enrolled PAVCS, an online school designed for independent learners. By tenth grade my parents and I made the decision to switch back to regular homeschooling, since it was a better fit with my advanced learning style and busy schedule. Being home educated my entire life has developed my learning style into that of a self motivated, responsible, and driven student.

Being a self motivated learner has also allowed me to become a self taught student. Over the past four years of highschool I have independently taught myself four English and Composition courses, four Social Studies courses, two Spanish courses, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Calculus. I was tutored in my Algebra and Geometry courses, but this year I exceeded the mathematical abilities of my tutor and decided to venture out on my own into the unknown waters of Calculus. Seven months into my Calculus course I am excelling and loving it! Not only am I a self motivated student in academia, but also in my extracurricular studies. I continued to teach myself piano for years after I exceeded the skill level of my teacher. I taught myself guitar, and I am now teaching myself to play the ukulele. Being self taught has showed me the value of an education.

Self motivation has had a tremendous impact on my life. I am responsible with my duties, my possessions, and my time. Self motivation has given me the drive to make myself complete a task, even when I don’t feel like it. Procrastination is not a habit I take part in. Being self motivated has allowed me to keep up with my school assignments. I’ve been able to maintain good grades through all of highschool, in all subjects. Being on top of my schedule and assignments helps to reduce stress in my life as well. Self motivation has had a positive impact on my life.

Self motivation is a great achievement. It allows me to be independent, driven, and responsible. Being self motivated has taught me to value my education. It has enabled me to be a good student, as well as reduced stress in my life. I consider self motivation my greatest academic achievement because it is a feat that will stay with me the rest of my life.

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Home — Essay Samples — Psychology — Personality Psychology — Motivation

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Essays on Motivation

🌟 the importance of writing a motivation essay 📝.

Motivation is like that extra sprinkle of magic dust that gives us the boost we need to achieve our goals and dreams ✨✨. It's the driving force behind our actions and the fuel that keeps us going when things get tough. Writing an essay about motivation allows us to delve deeper into this fascinating topic and explore its various aspects. So, why not grab your pen (or keyboard) and let's dive into the world of motivation! 💪📚

🔍 Choosing the Perfect Motivation Essay Topic 🤔

When it comes to choosing a topic for your motivation essay, there are a few things to consider. First, think about what aspect of motivation you find most intriguing. Is it personal motivation, motivation in the workplace, or maybe the psychology behind motivation? Once you have a general idea, narrow it down further to a specific angle that interests you the most.

💡 Motivation Argumentative Essay 💪📝

An argumentative essay on motivation requires you to take a stance and provide evidence to support your viewpoint. Here are ten exciting topics to get those creative juices flowing:

  • The role of intrinsic motivation in academic success
  • The impact of extrinsic rewards on employee motivation
  • Does social media affect motivation levels in teenagers?
  • The connection between motivation and self-esteem
  • How does motivation differ between genders?
  • The influence of music on motivation levels
  • Does money truly motivate people in the workplace?
  • The effects of positive reinforcement on motivation
  • The link between motivation and mental health
  • How does goal-setting impact motivation?

🌪️ Motivation Cause and Effect Essay 📝

In a cause and effect essay, you explore the reasons behind certain motivations and their outcomes. Here are ten thought-provoking topics to consider:

  • The causes and effects of procrastination on motivation
  • How does a lack of motivation impact academic performance?
  • The relationship between motivation and success in sports
  • The effects of parental motivation on children's achievements
  • How does motivation affect mental well-being?
  • The causes and effects of burnout on motivation levels
  • The impact of motivation on work-life balance
  • How does motivation affect creativity and innovation?
  • The causes and effects of peer pressure on motivation
  • The relationship between motivation and goal attainment

💬 Motivation Opinion Essay 💭📝

In an opinion essay, you express your personal thoughts and beliefs about motivation. Here are ten intriguing topics to spark your imagination:

  • Is self-motivation more effective than external motivation?
  • Are rewards a necessary form of motivation?
  • Should schools focus more on intrinsic motivation?
  • The role of motivation in achieving work-life balance
  • Is motivation a learned behavior or innate?
  • The impact of motivation on personal growth and development
  • Does motivation play a significant role in overcoming obstacles?
  • Is fear an effective motivator?
  • The role of motivation in maintaining a healthy lifestyle
  • Can motivation be sustained in the long term?

📚 Motivation Informative Essay 🧠📝

An informative essay on motivation aims to educate and provide valuable insights. Here are ten fascinating topics to explore:

  • The psychology behind motivation and its theories
  • How to stay motivated in challenging times
  • The impact of motivation on personal and professional success
  • Motivation techniques for achieving fitness goals
  • The role of motivation in leadership and management
  • Motivation in the context of mental health and well-being
  • The history of motivation research and key figures
  • Motivation strategies for students and educators
  • Motivation and its connection to creativity and innovation
  • Motivation in different cultural and societal contexts

📜 Thesis Statement Examples 📜

Here are a few thesis statement examples to inspire your motivation essay:

  • 1. "Motivation, whether intrinsic or extrinsic, plays a pivotal role in driving individuals towards achieving their goals and aspirations."
  • 2. "This essay explores the multifaceted nature of motivation, examining its psychological underpinnings, societal influences, and practical applications."
  • 3. "In a world filled with challenges and opportunities, understanding the mechanisms of motivation empowers individuals to overcome obstacles and reach new heights of success."

📝 Introduction Paragraph Examples 📝

Here are some introduction paragraph examples for your motivation essay:

  • 1. "Motivation is the driving force behind human actions, the invisible hand that propels us toward our goals. It is the spark that ignites the fire of determination within us, pushing us to overcome obstacles and realize our dreams."
  • 2. "In a world where challenges often outnumber opportunities, motivation serves as the compass guiding us through life's intricate maze. It is the unwavering belief in our abilities and the fuel that keeps our ambitions burning bright."
  • 3. "Picture a world without motivation—a world where dreams remain unfulfilled, talents remain hidden, and aspirations remain dormant. Fortunately, we do not live in such a world, and this essay delves into the profound impact of motivation on human lives."

🔚 Conclusion Paragraph Examples 📝

Here are some conclusion paragraph examples for your motivation essay:

  • 1. "As we conclude this journey through the realm of motivation, let us remember that it is the driving force behind our accomplishments, the cornerstone of our achievements. With unwavering motivation, we can surmount any obstacle and turn our aspirations into reality."
  • 2. "In the grand tapestry of human existence, motivation weaves the threads of determination, perseverance, and success. This essay's culmination serves as a testament to the enduring power of motivation and its ability to shape our destinies."
  • 3. "As we bid farewell to this exploration of motivation, let us carry forward the knowledge that motivation is not just a concept but a potent force that propels us toward greatness. With motivation as our guide, we can continue to chase our dreams and conquer new horizons."

The Puzzle of Motivation Analysis

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Brutus Character Analysis

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Motivation and Its Various Types

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Learning Styles and Motivation Reflection 

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Motivation is what explains why people or animals initiate, continue or terminate a certain behavior at a particular time. Motivational states are commonly understood as forces acting within the agent that create a disposition to engage in goal-directed behavior.

There are four main tyoes of motivation: Intrinsic, extrinsic, unconscious, and conscious.

Theories articulating the content of motivation: Maslow's hierarchy of needs, Herzberg's two-factor theory, Alderfer's ERG theory, Self-Determination Theory, Drive theory.

Relevant topics

  • Growth Mindset
  • Procrastination

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essay on self motivation

Motivation Essay for Students and Children

500+ words essay on motivation.

Everyone suggests other than the person lack motivation, or directly suggests the person remain motivated. But, no one ever tells what is the motivation of how one can stay motivated. Motivation means to face the obstacle and find an inspiration that helps you to go through tough times. In addition, it helps you to move further in life.

Motivation Essay

Meaning of Motivation

Motivation is something that cannot be understood with words but with practice. It means to be moved by something so strongly that it becomes an inspiration for you. Furthermore, it is a discipline that helps you to achieve your life goals and also helps to be successful in life .

Besides, it the most common practice that everyone does whether it is your boss in office or a school teacher or a university professor everyone motivates others in a way or other.

Role of Motivation

It is a strong tool that helps to get ahead in life. For being motivated we need a driving tool or goal that keeps us motivated and moves forward. Also, it helps in being progressive both physically and mentally.

Moreover, your goal does not be to big and long term they can be small and empowering. Furthermore, you need the right mindset to be motivated.

Besides, you need to push your self towards your goal no one other than you can push your limit. Also, you should be willing to leave your comfort zone because your true potential is going to revel when you leave your comfort zone.

Types of Motivation

Although there are various types of motivation according to me there are generally two types of motivation that are self- motivation and motivation by others.

Self-motivation- It refers to the power of someone to stay motivated without the influence of other situations and people. Furthermore, self-motivated people always find a way to reason and strength to complete a task. Also, they do not need other people to encourage them to perform a challenging task.

Motivation by others- This motivation requires help from others as the person is not able to maintain a self-motivated state. In this, a person requires encouragement from others. Also, he needs to listen to motivational speeches, a strong goal and most importantly and inspiration.

Get the huge list of more than 500 Essay Topics and Ideas

Importance of Motivation

Motivation is very important for the overall development of the personality and mind of the people. It also puts a person in action and in a competitive state. Furthermore, it improves efficiency and desire to achieve the goal. It leads to stability and improvement in work.

Above all, it satisfies a person’s needs and to achieve his/her goal. It helps the person to fight his negative attitude. The person also tries to come out of his/her comfort zone so that she/ he can achieve the goal.

To conclude, motivation is one of the key elements that help a person to be successful. A motivated person tries to push his limits and always tries to improve his performance day by day. Also, the person always gives her/his best no matter what the task is. Besides, the person always tries to remain progressive and dedicated to her/his goals.

FAQs about Motivation Essay

Q.1 Define what is motivation fit. A.1 This refers to a psychological phenomenon in which a person assumes or expects something from the job or life but gets different results other than his expectations. In a profession, it is a primary criterion for determining if the person will stay or leave the job.

Q.2 List some best motivators. A.2 some of the best motivators are:

  • Inspiration
  • Fear of failure
  • Power of Rejection
  • Don’t pity your self
  • Be assertive
  • Stay among positive and motivated people
  • Be calm and visionary

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David J Bredehoft Ph.D.

The Science Behind Self-Affirmations

Science is showing self-affirmations are valuable for health and well-being..

Posted August 7, 2023 | Reviewed by Michelle Quirk

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  • Affirmations are short statements that are said aloud or to oneself regularly.
  • Social psychologists have been doing research on self-affirmation theory for more than 40 years.
  • Researchers have found that self-affirmation can improve one's health and well-being in a variety of ways.

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Does repeating a positive phrase called an affirmation out loud or to oneself change one's feelings or behavior? Some psychologists believe the answer to this question is yes. Others remain skeptical. To answer this question we need to look at the science behind self- affirmations .

What Are Affirmations?

Affirmations are short statements that are said aloud or to oneself regularly. They also may be written and placed in locations always visible to the individual. They are repeated multiple times on a daily basis (for greater detail and background on affirmations, please read " Affirmations May Improve Life Satisfaction and Well-Being "). Affirmations are any act that underscores one's adequacy and reaffirms one's sense of self-integrity.

Research on Self-Affirmations

Social psychologists began serious academic research on self-affirmations in the 1980s and have continued for more than 40 years. This research is based on self-affirmation theory. Self-affirmation theory assumes the following:

  • In times of threat, we maintain the self by defending it from outside conflicting information.
  • We respond to threats in one domain by affirming self-worth in other domains.
  • Our core values play an essential role in maintaining the self.

The majority of research on self-affirmation theory follows the same research design or variations of it:

  • Participants are asked to identify a set of core values that they believe in.
  • Participants are followed longitudinally in an existing threat situation (e.g., student academic underperformance). Participants repeat affirmations to themselves daily. Performance is measured and compared both pre and post. Or
  • Participants are randomly assigned to either the (a) self-affirmation or (b) non–self-affirmation control condition. Participants in the self-affirmation condition experience affirmations of self-worth while the control group does not. Participants are then asked to complete a difficult task that induces an experience of failure. Pre- and post-experiment measurements are taken and the two groups' scores are compared.

Do Self-Affirmations Work?

Years of research show promise for self-affirmations as an intervention. Researchers have found that self-affirmation can improve one's life in a variety of ways. Here's a sampling of those findings:

  • Affirmations and the brain. Cascio et al. 2 used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology to measure two parts of the brain associated with (1) self-related processing and (2) rewards following self-affirmation activities. They found a measurable significant increase in brain activity in both of these regions, concluding that self-affirmations affect brain activity.
  • Self-control . Schmeichel and Vohs 10 found that self-affirmations helped participants achieve self-control by reflecting upon the values that guide their lives.
  • Self-efficacy . Epton and Harris 5 found that self-affirmation promotes health behavior changes. They designed an experiment to see if self-affirmation would increase a health-promoting behavior (eating more fruits and vegetables). A seven-day diary record of fruit and vegetable consumption showed that self-affirmed participants ate significantly more portions of fruit and vegetables.
  • Prosociality. Crocker, Niiya, and Mischkowski 4 found that writing essays about one's own important values increases feelings of love compared to writing about unimportant values.
  • Improving academic achievement. Cohen et al. 3 had African American students complete a series of brief structured writing assignments focusing on self-affirmation. A two-year follow-up showed that African Americans' grade point average (GPA) was raised by 0.24 grade points on average. Low-achieving African American students benefited the most. Sherman et al. 13 conducted a similar longitudinal field experiment in middle school with Latino-American and European American students. Affirmed Latino-American students earned higher grades than non-affirmed Latino-American students and were less likely to have their daily feelings of academic fit and motivation undermined by identity threat. These effects persisted for a period of three years or more.
  • Reducing stereotyping toward minority group members. Badea and Sherman 1 studied self-affirmation and prejudice reduction: "One exciting implication of the self-affirmation approach in the domain of prejudice reduction is that self-affirmation shows the potential malleability of prejudice in situations of intergroup conflict."
  • Happiness and meaning in life. Nelson et al. 9 conducted experiments with two different cultures: (a) psychology students in South Korea and (b) psychology students in a public U.S. university of which the majority were Asian American (66 percent). Participants were randomly assigned to either a self-affirmation or a control condition. Results suggest that affirming important values bolsters one's happiness and meaning in life.
  • Promoting health behavior change. Epton et al. 6 conducted a meta-analysis with 41 self-affirmation studies. The studies all had participants reflect upon important values, attributes, or social relations to reduce one's defensiveness to health behavior change. They found that when self-affirmations were paired with persuasive health information it was effective in changing health attitudes and behaviors. Falk et al. 7 used MRI technology to measure brain activity in participants' prefrontal cortex, a portion of the brain associated with positive valuation. They found that participants in the self-affirmation condition produced more brain activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex during exposure to health messages and went on to increase their objectivity. Affirmation of core values allows at-risk individuals to be open to health messages and behavior change.
  • Affirmations and smartphone overuse. Xu et al. 14 found that just-in-time self-affirmations helped smartphone overusers reduce phone use by 57.2 percent.

This is only a brief review of self-affirmation research. For a more comprehensive review, I direct you to Self-Affirmation Interventions by Sherman et al. 12 and Self-Affirmation Theory and the Science of Well-Being by Andrew Howell. 8 There is a growing body of evidence showing the use of self-affirmations to be a valuable tool for health and well-being.

Practice Aloha. Do all things with love, grace, and gratit ude.

© 2023 David J. Bredehoft

1. Badea, C., & Sherman, D. K. (2019). Self-affirmation and prejudice reduction: When and why? Current Directions in Psychological Science, 28 (1), 40–46.

2. Cascio, C. N., et al. (2016). Self-affirmation activates brain systems associated with self-related processing and reward and is reinforced by future orientation. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience , 2016, 621–629.

3. Cohen, G. L., et al. (2009). Recursive processes in self-affirmation: Intervening to close the minority achievement gap. S cience, 324 , 400–403.

4. Crocker, J., Niiya, Y., & Mischkowski, D. (2008). Why does writing about important values reduce defensiveness? Self-affirmation and the role of positive, other-directed feelings. Psychological Science , 19 , 740–747.

5. Epton, T., & Harris, P. R. (2008). Self-affirmation promotes health behavior change. Health Psychology , 27, 746–752. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.27.6.746

6. Epton, T., et al. (2014, August 18). The impact of self-affirmation on health-behavior change: A meta-analysis. Health Psychology . Advanced online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0000116

7. Falk, E. B., et al. (2015). Self-affirmation alters the brain’s response to health messages and subsequent behavior change. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112 (7), 1977–1982.

8. Howell, A. J. (2017). Self-affirmation theory and the science of well-being. Journal of Happiness Studies, 18, 293–311.

9. Nelson, S. K., Fuller, J. A. K., Choi, I., & Lyubomirsky, S. (2014). Beyond self-protection: Self-affirmation benefits hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin , 40 , 998–1011.

10. Schmeichel, B. J., & Vohs, K. (2009). Self-affirmation and self-construal: Affirming core values counteracts ego depletion. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 96 , 770–782.

11. Sherman, D. K. (2013). Self-affirmation: Understanding the effects. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 7 (11), 834–845.

12. Sherman, D. K., Lokhande, M., Muller, T., & Cohen, G. L. (2021). Self-affirmations Interventions. In G. M. Walton & A. J. Crum (Eds.), Handbook of Wise Interventions: How Social Psychology Can Help People Change (pp. 63–99). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

13. Sherman, D. K., et al. (2013). Defecting the trajectory and changing the narrative: How self-affirmation affects academic performance and motivation under identity threat. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104 (4), 591–618.

14. Xu, X et al. (2022). TypeOut: Leveraging just-in-time self-affirmation for smartphone overuse reduction. Creative Commons Attribution International. https://doi.org/10.1145/3491102.3517476

David J Bredehoft Ph.D.

David Bredehoft, Ph.D., is a professor emeritus and former chair of psychology at Concordia University.

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COMMENTS

  1. Self-Motivation Explained + 100 Ways To Motivate Yourself

    Much of Geller's work on self-motivation is grounded in the research of psychologist and self-efficacy researcher Albert Bandura. In 1981, Bandura set the stage for Geller's current conceptualization of self-motivation with this description: "Self-motivation . . . requires personal standards against which to evaluate ongoing performance.

  2. Self-Motivation: 5 Reasons It Is Crucial And How To Improve

    1. Visualization. Visualizing oneself to achieve 13 the desired outcome can help in building motivation, confidence, and focus. 2. Self-reflection. Reflecting on one's experiences 14 , strengths, weaknesses, and progress helps in identifying areas of improvement, setting new goals, and staying motivated. 3.

  3. Self-Motivation: Definition, Examples, and Tips

    Making sure to clean the house when it gets messy. Keeping the grass cut. Doing the dishes right after eating a meal. Examples of self-motivation in relationships. Doing kind things for your partner. Being sure to frequently say words of affirmation to your partner. Working through problems instead of running away.

  4. What Is Self-Motivation? Push Yourself to Meet Your Goals

    Self-motivation is the secret weapon to achieving your goals. It impacts both your professional and personal life. Without it, you could struggle. Though having a support network is important, you can't depend on others to push you your entire life. Our goals require a lot of focus, which can be easy to lose.

  5. How to Motivate Yourself: 11 Tips for Self Improvement

    Put your goal on the calendar. Make working toward your goal a habit. Plan for imperfection. Set small goals to build momentum. Track your progress. Reward yourself for the little wins as well as the big ones. Embrace positive peer pressure. Practice gratitude (including for yourself). Do some mood lifting.

  6. Essay about Self-Motivation is Empowering

    For me, self- motivation is empowering. Finding something that I enjoy and love to do and setting the final goal of achieving it. My main goal that I have set right now is to work towards finishing my degree. My motivation behind this is to be able to get a better job and …show more content…. I am learning to take each assignment and task ...

  7. How to Increase Self-Motivation

    Complementing goals: To increase goal commitment, select multiple means serving a single goal (e.g., eating healthy and dancing both help you lose weight; Figure 1B). To attain more goals, use ...

  8. 11 self-motivation examples to help you achieve your goals

    Here are eight examples of describing self-motivation in a job interview: Talk about when you did great work because of your passion. Give an example of when and how you overcame an obstacle independently. Mention your strong work ethic. Describe with personal anecdotes how self-motivation is a core trait of yours.

  9. Motivation

    Motivation encompasses the desire to continue striving toward meaning, purpose, and a life worth living. ... Eventually, Maslow extended the theory to include a need for self-transcendence: People ...

  10. 3 Best Essays on Self Motivation

    Essay on Self Motivation For Students: Motivation is the driving force that helps individuals achieve their goals and overcome challenges. It is a key ingredient to success in life, especially for students who face academic pressure and personal responsibilities. However, motivation is not something that magically appears; it requires constant ...

  11. Mary Sharp: The Self Motivated Student by Mary

    Mary Sharp: The Self Motivated Student by Mary - March 2014 Scholarship Essay. I consider self motivation my greatest academic achievement. My self motivation has had a positive impact on my life. Self motivation has allowed me to be an independent learner. I set due dates for myself, and I push myself to my full potential.

  12. Self-Motivation's Role in Academic Success

    In this essay, the role of self-motivation is explored, while drawing from personal experiences and scholarly sources to show its impact on academic success. To begin with, self-motivated students ...

  13. Motivation Essay

    Motivation in different cultural and societal contexts; 📜 Thesis Statement Examples 📜. Here are a few thesis statement examples to inspire your motivation essay: 1. "Motivation, whether intrinsic or extrinsic, plays a pivotal role in driving individuals towards achieving their goals and aspirations." 2.

  14. Essay on Motivation for Students and Children in English

    February 13, 2024 by Prasanna. Motivation Essay: Motivation is important in life because it helps us gain valued results like personal growth, better well-being, enhanced performance, or a sense of confidence. Motivation is a road to improve our way of feeling, thinking, and behaving. The advantages of motivation are seen in our way of living life.

  15. Motivation Essay for Students and Children

    Motivation by others-This motivation requires help from others as the person is not able to maintain a self-motivated state. In this, a person requires encouragement from others. Also, he needs to listen to motivational speeches, a strong goal and most importantly and inspiration. Get the huge list of more than 500 Essay Topics and Ideas ...

  16. PDF SELF-CONFIDENCE AND PERSONAL MOTIVATION

    0 1{θ≥c/βδV } (δθV − c)dF (θ), where 1{·} denotes the indicator function, and note that the integrand is increasing in θ. Definition 1 An individual with distribution F over ability θ has higher self-confidence than another one with distribution G if the likelihood ratio f (θ) /g (θ) is increasing in θ.

  17. Self Motivation

    This essay is about the importance of self-motivation and self-management in my studies. Motivation is one of the factors that cause, channel, and sustain an individual's behaviour (Stoner,2006) While management is the process of planning, leading, and controlling the work of organization members and of using all available organizational ...

  18. How Self-Motivation can Create a Positive Impact on Your Life?

    Introduction Self-motivation is a process wherein a person develop ways on how to keep his or her self motivated at all times despite challenging times and without direct help from other people. Exper ... From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

  19. The Science Behind Self-Affirmations

    Defecting the trajectory and changing the narrative: How self-affirmation affects academic performance and motivation under identity threat. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104 (4 ...

  20. Motivation, self-regulation, and writing achievement on a university

    The changes in participants' motivation, self-regulation and essay writing scores between T1 and T2 are detailed in Table 3. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests indicated that the mean score of self-efficacy increased with a large effect size and statistical significance (Z = -6.06, p < .000, r = -.76).

  21. Self Motivation Essay

    Self Motivation Essay. This essay sample was donated by a student to help the academic community. Papers provided by EduBirdie writers usually outdo students' samples. Friends I witnessed so many bad and discouraging moments here as whenever my earnings sometimes go to zero and for almost two to three hours of regular activities I hardly earned ...

  22. [PDF] Self-Efficacy, Motivation and Learning Strategies in Germany and

    Learning strategies are important factors for students' academic success. Motivation and self-efficacy influence the choice and the use of specific learning strategies (Entwistle & Ramsden, 1983). In this study, we want to assess how these three factors and their interaction are determined by the cultural setting (eastern vs. western culture). Therefore, we tested 271 Japanese students (198 ...

  23. Transforming Learning and Teaching Strategies Free Essay Example

    5. Examine your attitudes about college and yourself. If you positively approach your studies, your professors, your books, your fellow students, and yourself, you increase your academic motivation. A negative attitude produces negative results in performance.