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How to Get Into UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine: The Definitive Guide

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by internationalmedicalaid

Part 1: Introduction

Located in San Antonio, Texas, the University of the Incarnate Word is one of the oldest Catholic universities in the state. The UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine is one of the newest additions to the university. UIW admitted its first class in July 2017 and received pre-accreditation status through the Commission on Osteopathic Colleges.

Community involvement is important to UIW. They’ve partnered with Southside ISD, San Antonio Housing Authority, WellMed and the Texas Immunization Partnership, among others, to provide healthcare to all of San Antonio’s citizens. 

In this article, we’re continuing our series of definitive guides on how to get into medical school. It’s all part of our medical school admissions consulting. Today, we’re going to dive into the world of the University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine. Differing from the traditional MD degree in word and deed, osteopathic schools set a holistic, whole-body foundation to practicing medicine. 

Part 2: Programs Offered at UIW

Being a brand new medical school, UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine is currently offering two degree options: 

  • Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO)
  • Master of Biomedical Sciences (MBS)

Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine

Doctors who practice osteopathic medicine have a unique approach to medical care. While traditional MDs usually focus on  symptom relief and pain management , DOs focus on how the mind, body, and spirit work together. DOs believe that the body can heal itself when everything is balanced. The ultimate goal of every DO is for their patients to have healthy, self-healing bodies.

UIW School of Medicine’s DO program consists of two phases, with each phase lasting for two years. Phase I focuses on the principles and practices behind osteopathic medicine. How are those principles implemented in clinical settings? How are they applied to biomedical sciences? The curriculum seeks to answer those questions. It does so through ten different modules.

  • Essentials/EMT
  • MSK, Touch and Personhood
  • Molecules, Cells, Compassion
  • Host Defense and Communication
  • GI System, Nutrition, Appetite
  • Circulation, Respiration, Regulation
  • Endocrine Reproduction Respect
  • Mind Brain, and Behavior
  • Capstone (Spirituality, Mental Health and Wellness)
  • Board Exam Preparation

Phase II builds on Phase I  but also takes students outside their comfort zones. Enough time has been spent in the classroom to enable students to step into the clinic. They’ll begin with eight different rotations that each last for six weeks. 

  • Family Medicine
  • General Surgery
  • Internal Medicine
  • Women’s Health
  • Underserved (Rural, Military, Correctional)
  • Hospital Medicine
  • Emergency Medicine (fourth year)

Students will have a one-week break after every two rotations. They will reflect on what they’ve learned and prepare to move forward. Mentorship is an important part of each student’s rotation experience. 

For more in-depth information about the program, go  here .

Now, let’s take a look at the Master of Biomedical Sciences degree.

Master of Biomedical Sciences

Please note that this program does not award graduates with a DO degree. But successfully completing this master’s degree does make it easier to get into the DO program. You’ll have the following advantages:

  • After filling out your AACOMAS application, you’ll automatically receive the UIWSOM application, which is normally on an invitational basis. You won’t need to pay the $50 application fee, either.
  • You’re guaranteed an interview with the admissions committee. The interview format will be the Multiple Mini Interview format (which we discuss here) and will be scheduled after you’ve submitted your application.

So, what does the Master of Biomedical Sciences program entail? Take a look at the coursework you’ll complete during the 37-month long program.

  • Professional Development Seminar I & II
  • Health Humanities
  • Research Methods & Design I & II
  • Advanced Cell Biology and Biochemistry
  • Epidemiology
  • Human Anatomy I & II
  • Biomedical Physiology
  • Introduction to Bioethics
  • Microbial Pathogenesis

Go  here  for detailed information about each course. If you’re interested in osteopathic medicine, the University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine might be perfect for you. Let’s take a look at how much it costs to attend UIW.

Part 3: Tuition and Cost of Attendance

The DO program and MBS degree both fall under the Graduate category for tuition. You’ll pay $1,030 per credit hour for the time you’re enrolled in the DO program. That’s $3,090 per three-credit courses. If you take 12 credits per semester, that’s $74,160 per year at UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine.

The MBS program costs $975 per credit hours. You’ll pay approximately $109,000 for this master’s degree.

Keep in mind that these numbers only refer to tuition. University fees, textbooks and supplies, housing, food and transportation will need to be calculated separately.

For discounts and more information regarding tuition, go  here . 

Financial aid is available for students who qualify. For more information, go  here .

Part 4: Requirements for Applicants

Doctor of osteopathic medicine program.

If you want to apply to the University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine, now is the time. The application process opened last month and will be open until March 15, 2022. 

UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine doesn’t have specific requirements for getting in. But if you want to be competitive (which you should!), these are the stats for the Class of 2020.

  • 3.57 overall GPA
  • 3.46 science GPA
  • 503 MCAT score

The school does expect students to meet the following technical standards:

  • Observation
  • Communication
  • Motor Function
  • Intellectual—Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities
  • Behavioral and Social Attributes
  • Legal and Ethical Standards

For detailed information on each of these technical standards, go  here . 

Master of Biomedical Sciences Program

To be considered for this program, you’ll need to meet the following requirements:

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited university in the United States
  • Official transcripts of all completed college coursework
  • Three letters of recommendation: – One letter from a faculty member – One letter from a health care provider – Committee letters are accepted.
  • Test scores appropriate for your discipline: – GRE for PA, PT and Pharmacy – DAT for Dental – MCAT for Medical
  • GPA must be at least 3.0/4.0
  • Completed secondary application and $50 application fee

Ready to apply? Get started with the  AACOMAS , your primary application. After you’ve completed this application, the admissions committee will review it and decide whether to send you the school’s secondary application. Both schools operate with a rolling admissions system (we cover that here). So, the sooner you apply, the better your chance of getting in! 

It’s a great sign if you receive a secondary application. This means that you impressed the admissions committee. They want to learn more about you as an applicant. After reading your secondary essays, they’ll decide whether to interview you. 

Part 5: Secondary Essays

The University of the Incarnate World School of Osteopathic Medicine asks applicants to answer the following questions. All questions are required and come with a 200-word limit. This means that you’ll need to answer each question in as few words as possible. For some writers, this can be more challenging than writing a long personal statement. 

If you need help, International Medical Aid offers admissions consulting services. We have hourly consulting, as well as four different tiers of consulting packages. So, whatever you might need help with, we’ve got your back. Go  here  for more information. 

Question #1 Explain your understanding of osteopathic medicine. Tell us why you’re pursing a DO degree instead of an MD degree.

While this question might seem unnecessary, it’s valid. Osteopathic physicians practice medicine  very differently  from medical doctors. UIW wants to make sure you know what you’re getting yourself into. Remember, you only have 200 words to answer this question. So, you’ll want to explain very concisely.

Here’s an example:

Osteopathic medicine has proven to be a great blessing to my family. To make a long story short, my little brother is a brain tumor survivor. He chronically dealt with headaches when he was younger. His pediatrician was convinced that he was dehydrated or just chronically had headaches. There was no loss of balance or any of the usual symptoms that indicate a tumor. But Matthew’s headaches didn’t go away.  My parents got tired of Michael’s pain. They wanted him to feel better, but taking him to his pediatrician felt like a moot point. So, they found an osteopathic doctor instead. Dr. Webber didn’t just prescribe Matthew with medication to mask his symptoms. Instead, he ran tests and discovered that Matthew had a brain tumor.  I’m thrilled to share that Matthew has been fine for years now. But without Dr. Webber, we might not have my brother with us. That’s why osteopathic medicine is important to me. Focusing on the body, mind, and spirit together can resolve health issues far better than any medication that takes away pain.

Question #2 The University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine is the first, faith-based, osteopathic medical school in the state of Texas. Share with us what you will contribute to our university to help us fulfill our mission.

My faith has always been my cornerstone. My belief in Jesus Christ as my Lord and Savior has helped me through some of the toughest times in my life. I know that medical school will be difficult. The coursework will be rigorous and expectations will be high. I plan to start every morning with Bible reading and prayer just like I do now.  I hope that, by continuing to live my faith on campus, I’ll be able to exemplify the mission of the University of the Incarnate Word. I want my medical practice to be centered around my faith. I want to glorify God in all that I do as I seek to make my patient’s lives better. I believe that students who set good examples and live their faith are what UIW is looking for. And I believe that alumna who represent what UIW stands for will serve as a testament to the school’s mission. I hope that you’ll consider me.

Question #3 Please share with us how you prepared for the MCAT exam. Talk about what tools you used for preparation, how long you studied for, which practice exams you took, and so forth.

This answer will look different for everyone. There’s no right or wrong answer here. We recommend giving as much detail as 200 words will allow. For example, don’t just name the tools you used. Describe how those tools helped you learn. Include all of your preparation.

Question #4 Not every applicant is admitted on their first try. If this is your second time applying to UIWSOM, tell us how you’ve strengthened your application since last time. 

This question only applies to you if you’re a second-year applicant. There is no shame in this if you are! Many successful doctors didn’t get in on their first try. But the University of the Incarnate Word wants to make sure that your application is stronger this time. It would be a waste of the school’s time to re-evaluate you if you were the exact same candidate you were before–the one who didn’t get in. 

Don’t feel like you have to share the most intimate details of your life. Nor do you need to justify your application. We recommend comparing your current application to your past application and highlighting how much more prepared you are. If you need help,  reach out to us . Helping DO candidates is part of what we do. 

Part 6: Interview Day at UIW

Did you score an interview with UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine? If so, congratulations! This is a major step in your medical school career. 

The University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine conducts interviews using the Multiple Mini Interview Format. Commonly abbreviated to “MMI”, this interview format has revolutionized some of the traditional aspects that medical school applicants have come to expect. 

How is it different? You won’t have to sit still and blindly answer questions while secretly sweating through your blazer. Instead, you’ll know each question before you’re asked it. You’ll have time to prepare your answer. And then you’ll have 7-10 minutes to discuss your answer with your interviewer. 

This method of interviewing is designed to take a lot of the stress out of the interview process. It allows you to breathe and focus on preparing your answers instead of focusing on your breath and trying not to stutter through the questions. 

For your interview day, we recommend dressing professionally. If you look good on the outside, you’ll feel better on the inside. Remember that your goal is to become a doctor and this is a major step in that process.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you’re not likely to visit the UIW San Antonio campus for your interview. Most medical schools are still conducting interviews virtually via tools like Zoom or Skype. While it can be disappointing to not attend an in-person interview, there are no traveling costs. You just need a secure internet connection. We recommend choosing a blank background that won’t clash with your outfit. You can’t go wrong with a blazer and blouse. 

If you’re unsure of whether you want to practice osteopathic medicine, check out  Choose DO . Choose DO is a fantastic resource that will educate you on your role as an osteopathic healthcare provider. Choose DO also has resources to help prepare you long before you start filling out applications. DO school admissions sometimes work differently from MD programs, which is why medical school admissions consulting can be so vital to a DO candidate’s success. DO school admissions don’t always involve secondary essays, which further emphasizes the importance of writing a strong  personal essay . 

Feeling overwhelmed by all the details? We’ll admit that getting into medical school is a lot of work. That’s why International Medical Aid offers medical school admissions consulting. We believe that preparation can make a world of difference for every medical school applicant. Check out our resources on our  Admissions Consulting  page. And while you’re on our blog, check out the other medical schools we cover in our definitive guide series. 

  • Baylor College of Medicine
  • George Washington University School of Medicine
  • Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
  • St. George’s University School of Medicine
  • Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (in Pennsylvania)
  • Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University
  • Wake Forest University School of Medicine
  • Western University of Health Sciences (in California)
  • Drexel University College of Medicine
  • Stritch School of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago
  • Georgetown University School of Medicine
  • Yale School of Medicine
  • Perelman School of Medicine
  • UCLA Medical School
  • NYU Medical School
  • Washington University School of Medicine
  • Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
  • Brown Medical School

International Medical Aid provides  global internship opportunities  for students and clinicians who are looking to broaden their horizons and experience healthcare on an international level. These program participants have the unique opportunity to shadow healthcare providers as they treat individuals who live in remote and underserved areas and who don’t have easy access to medical attention. International Medical Aid also provides  medical school admissions consulting  to individuals applying to medical school and PA school programs. We review primary and secondary applications, offer guidance for personal statements and essays, and conduct mock interviews to prepare you for the admissions committees that will interview you before accepting you into their programs. IMA is here to provide the tools you need to help further your career and expand your opportunities in healthcare.

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incarnate word medical school secondary essays

incarnate word medical school secondary essays

University of the Incarnate Word (UIWSOM)

Secondary essays, secondary essay prompts.

Essay Topics ('23 – '24) ‍

1. Explain your understanding of osteopathic medicine and your interest in pursuing this pathway to becoming a physician. (200 words)

2. UIWSOM is the first faith-based school of osteopathic medicine in Texas and mission driven. How will you contribute to the UIWSOM by fulfilling this mission? (200 words)

3. Please describe your preparation for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Include any tools you may have used to prepare, length of study time, practice exams, etc… (200 words)

4. If you are reapplying to UIWSOM, what have you done to strengthen your application since you last applied? (If applicable) (200 words)

Are you a current or former student of the University of the Incarnate Word who falls in one of the categories below?

a) Current MBS student

b) Previous UIWSOM MBS student

c) Current UIW undergraduate student in Direct Admit program

Essay Topics ('22 – '23) 1. Explain your understanding of osteopathic medicine and your interest in pursuing this pathway to becoming a physician. (200 words)

2.UIWSOM is the first faith-based school of osteopathic medicine in Texas and mission driven. How will you contribute to the UIWSOM by fulfilling this mission? (200 words)

3.Please describe your preparation for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Include any tools you may have used to prepare, length of study time, practice exams, etc… (200 words)

4. If applicable, please answer the following

If you are reapplying to UIWSOM, what have you done to strengthen your application since you last applied? (200 words)

Essay Topics ('21 – '22) ‍

Essay Topics (’20 – ’21) ‍

1. Explain your understanding of osteopathic medicine and your interest in pursuing this pathway to becoming a physician. (200 words limit)

2. UIWSOM is the first faith-based school of osteopathic medicine in Texas and mission driven. How will you contribute to the UIWSOM by fulfilling this mission? (200 words limit)

3. Please describe your preparation for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Include any tools you may have used to prepare, length of study time, practice exams, etc… (200 words limit)

4. If you are reapplying to UIWSOM, what have you done to strengthen your application since you last applied? (If applicable) (200 words limit)

Essay Topics ('19 – '20) ‍

1. Explain your understanding of osteopathic medicine and your interest in pursuing this pathway to becoming a physician. (200 Words)

2. UIWSOM is the first faith-based school of osteopathic medicine in Texas and mission driven. How will you contribute to the UIWSOM by fulfilling this mission? (200 Words)

3. Please describe your preparation for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Include any tools you may have used to prepare, length of study time, practice exams, etc. (200 Words)

4. If applicable, please answer the following: If you are reapplying to UIWSOM, what have you done to strengthen your application since you last applied? (200 Words)

Essay Topics ('18 – '19) ‍

1. Explain how your exposure to and experience in the medical profession has helped prepare you for osteopathic studies? Provide specific examples. (Word Limit 200)

2. UIWSOM is the first faith-based school of osteopathic medicine in Texas and mission driven. How will you contribute to the UIWSOM by fulfilling this mission? (Word Limit 200)

3. In preparation for the MCAT did you use a professional preparation course (Kaplan, Princeton Review etc.)? If so, please indicate course and process for using it. (Word Limit 200)

4. If you are reapplying to UIWSOM, what have you done to strengthen your application since you last applied? (Word Limit 200)

Essay Topics ('17 – '18) ‍

1. Explain how your exposure to and experience in the medical profession has helped prepare you for osteopathic studies? Provide specific examples. (Max. 250 words)

2. UIWSOM is the first faith-based school of osteopathic medicine in Texas and mission driven. How will you contribute to the UIWSOM by fulfilling this mission? (Max. 250 words)

3. Please describe your preparation for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Include tools used to prepare, length of study time, practice exams, etc... (250 words)

‍ Essay Topics ('16 – '17) ‍

1. Explain how your exposure to and experience in the medical profession has helped prepare you for osteopathic studies? Provide specific examples. (Max. 1000 words)

2. UIWSOM is the first faith-based school of osteopathic medicine in Texas and mission driven. How will you contribute to the UIWSOM by fulfilling this mission? (Max. 1000 words)

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incarnate word medical school secondary essays

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Incarnate Word - Secondary Essay Prompts

Access our complete list of all Secondary Essay Prompts from Incarnate Word in San Antonio , TX for the 2018 - 2023 admissions cycles.

1 . Explain your understanding of osteopathic medicine and your interest in pursuing this pathway to becoming a physician.

2 . UIWSOM is the first faith-based school of osteopathic medicine in Texas and mission driven. How will you contribute to the UIWSOM by fulfilling this mission?

3 . Please describe your preparation for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Include any tools you may have used to prepare, length of study time, practice exams, etc…

4 . If you are reapplying to UIWSOM, what have you done to strengthen your application since you last applied? (If applicable)

5 . Are you a current or former student of the University of the Incarnate Word who falls in one of the categories below? 1) Current MBS student 2) Previous UIWSOM MBS student 3) Current UIW undergraduate student in Direct Admit program

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Med School Insiders

Medical School Secondary Application Prompts

Secondary Essays by School/Program

The Med School Insiders Secondary Application Database is updated for the 2023 application cycle! Medical schools are sorted alphabetically below. 

Each school’s prompts are accompanied by expert tips and strategies to help you craft a more effective secondary application. To take your secondary applications to the next level, take a look at our secondary application packages !

A B C D E F G H I J   L M N O P   R S T U V W   Y

Albany Medical College (Albany, NY)

Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University (Bronx, NY)

Baylor College of Medicine (Houston, TX)

Boston University School of Medicine (Boston, MA)

Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University (Greenville, NC)

Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School (Providence, RI)

California Northstate University College of Medicine (Elk Grove, CA)

California University of Science and Medicine (Colton, CA)

Carle Illinois College of Medicine (Urbana, IL)

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (Cleveland, OH)

Central Michigan University College of Medicine (Mount Pleasant, MI)

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (Los Angeles, CA)

Chicago Medical School – Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine & Science (North Chicago, IL)

Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine (Cleveland, OH)

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (New York, NY)

Cooper Medical School of Rowan University (Camden, NJ)

Creighton University School of Medicine (Omaha, NE )

CUNY School of Medicine (New York, NY )

Dartmouth Medical School (Hanover, NH)

Drexel University College of Medicine (Philadelphia, PA)

Duke University School of Medicine (Durham, NC)

East Tennessee State University – James H. Quillen College of Medicine (Johnson City, TN)

Eastern Virginia Medical School (Norfolk, VA)

Emory University School of Medicine (Atlanta, GA)

Florida Atlantic University Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine (Boca Raton, FL)

Florida International University College of Medicine (Miami, FL)

Florida State University College of Medicine (Tallahassee, FL)

Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine – Quinnipiac University (North Haven, CT)

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine (Scranton, PA)

George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (Washington, DC)

Georgetown University School of Medicine (Washington, DC )

Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine (Nutley, NJ)

Harvard Medical School (Boston, MA)

Hofstra University Zucker School of Medicine (Hempstead, NY)

Howard University College of Medicine (Washington, DC )

Indiana University School of Medicine (Indianapolis, IN)

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (Baltimore, MD)

Loma Linda University School of Medicine (Loma Linda, CA)

Louisiana State University HSC – School of Medicine at New Orleans (New Orleans, LA)

Louisiana State University HSC – School of Medicine in Shreveport (Shreveport, LA)

Loyola University Chicago – Stritch School of Medicine (Maywood, IL)

Marshall University – Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine

Mayo Clinic School of Medicine – Minnesota (Rochester, MN)

Mayo Clinic School of Medicine – Arizona (Scottsdale, AZ)

Medical College of Georgia – School of Medicine (Augusta, GA)

Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI)

Medical University of South Carolina – College of Medicine (Charleston, SC)

Meharry Medical College (Nashville, TN)

Mercer University School of Medicine (Macon, GA)

Michigan State University College of Human Medicine (East Lansing, MI)

Morehouse School of Medicine (Atlanta, GA)

Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine (New York, NY)

New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (Old Westbury, NY)

New York Medical College School of Medicine (Valhalla, NY)

New York University School of Medicine (New York, NY)

Northeastern Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) (Rootstown, OH)

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (Chicago, IL)

Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine (Rochester, MI)

Ohio State University College of Medicine (Columbus, OH)

Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine (Portland, OR)

Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine (Hershey, PA)

Ponce Health Sciences University (PHSU) (Ponce, Puerto Rico)

Rush Medical College of Rush University Medical Center (Chicago, IL)

Rutgers University New Jersey Medical School (Newark, NJ)

Rutgers University Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (Piscataway, NJ)

Saint Louis University School of Medicine (St. Louis, MO)

San Juan Bautista School of Medicine (Caguas, Puerto Rico)

Sanford School of Medicine of the University of South Dakota (Sioux Falls, SD)

Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (Springfield, IL)

Stony Brook School of Medicine at University Medical Center (Stony Brook, NY)

Stanford University School of Medicine (Stanford, CA)

SUNY Downstate Medical Center – College of Medicine (Brooklyn, NY)

SUNY Upstate Medical University – College of Medicine (Syracuse, NY)

Temple University Lewis Katz School of Medicine (Philadelphia, PA)

Texas A & M Health Science Center – College of Medicine (College Station, TX)

Texas Tech University HSC – Paul L. Foster School of Medicine (El Paso, TX)

Texas Tech University HSC School of Medicine (Lubbock, TX)

Thomas Jefferson University — Sidney Kimmel Medical College (Philadelphia, PA)

Tufts University School of Medicine (Boston, MA)

Tulane University School of Medicine (New Orleans, LA)

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences – F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine (Bethesda, MD)

Universidad Central del Caribe School of Medicine (Bayamon, Puerto Rico)

University at Buffalo – School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (Buffalo, NY)

University of Alabama School of Medicine (Birmingham, AL)

University of Arizona College of Medicine (Phoenix, AZ)

University of Arizona College of Medicine (Tucson, AZ)

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences – College of Medicine (Little Rock, AR)

University of California Davis School of Medicine (Sacramento, CA)

University of California Irvine School of Medicine (Irvine, CA)

University of California Los Angeles (UCLA David Geffen) (Los Angeles, CA)

University of California Riverside School of Medicine (Riverside, CA)

University of California San Diego School of Medicine (San Diego, CA)

University of California San Francisco School of Medicine (San Francisco, CA)

University of Central Florida College of Medicine (Orlando, FL)

University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine (Chicago, IL)

University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (Cincinnati, OH)

University of Colorado School of Medicine (Denver, CO)

University of Connecticut School of Medicine (Farmington, CT)

University of Florida College of Medicine (Gainesville, FL)

University of Hawaii at Manoa John A. Burns School of Medicine (Honolulu, HI)

University of Illinois College of Medicine (Chicago, IL)

University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine (Iowa City, IA)

University of Kansas School of Medicine (Kansas City, KS)

University of Kentucky College of Medicine (Lexington, KY)

University of Louisville School of Medicine (Louisville, KY)

University of Maryland School of Medicine (Baltimore, MD)

University of Massachusetts School of Medicine (Worcester, MA)

University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine (Miami, FL)

University of Michigan Medical School (Ann Arbor, MI)

University of Minnesota Medical School – Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN)

University of Minnesota Medical School – Duluth (Duluth, MN)

University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Medicine (Jackson, MS)

University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Medicine (Kansas City, MO)

University of Missouri–Columbia School of Medicine (Columbia, MO)

University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Medicine (Omaha, NE)

University of Nevada–Reno School of Medicine (Reno, NV)

University of Nevada–Las Vegas School of Medicine (Las Vegas, NV)

University of New Mexico School of Medicine (Albuquerque, NM)

University of North Carolina (UNC) Chapel Hill School of Medicine (Chapel Hill, NC)

University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences (Grand Forks, ND)

University of Oklahoma College of Medicine (Oklahoma City, OK)

University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine (Philadelphia, PA)

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (Pittsburgh, PA)

University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine (San Juan, Puerto Rico)

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry (Rochester, NY)

University of South Alabama College of Medicine (Mobile, AL)

University of South Florida (USF) Morsani College of Medicine (Tampa, FL)

University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine (Los Angeles, CA)

University of Tennessee HSC College of Medicine (Memphis, TN)

University of Texas Austin Dell Medical School (Austin, TX)

University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) School of Medicine (Galveston, TX)

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine (Edinburg, TX)

University of Texas Houston McGovern Medical School (Houston, TX)

University of Texas San Antonio School of Medicine (San Antonio, TX)

University of Texas Southwestern (UTSW) Medical School (Dallas, TX)

University of Toledo College of Medicine (Toledo, OH)

University of Utah School of Medicine (Salt Lake City, UT)

University of Virginia School of Medicine (Charlottesville, VA)

University of Vermont College of Medicine (Burlington, VT)

University of Washington School of Medicine (Seattle, WA)

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (Madison, WI)

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (Nashville, TN)

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine (Richmond, VA)

Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine (Roanoke, VA)

Wake Forest University School of Medicine – Bowman Gray Campus (Winston-Salem, NC)

Washington State University Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine (Spokane, WA)

Washington University in St. Louis – School of Medicine (St. Louis, MO)

Wayne State University School of Medicine (Detroit, MI)

Weill Cornell Medicine Medical College (Manhattan, NY)

West Virginia University School of Medicine (Morgantown, WV)

Western Michigan University School of Medicine (Kalamazoo, MI)

Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine (Dayton, OH)

Yale University School of Medicine (New Haven, CT)

incarnate word medical school secondary essays

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100% of Eligible Students Match at UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine 2024 Match Day

On March 15, the UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine (UIWSOM) hosted its annual Match Day celebration, welcoming family and loved ones to support their soon-to-be doctors as they learned where they matched for residency. The school hosted its first Match Day in 2021 with 96% of students matching, followed by 2022 and 2023 with 99% of students matching both years. This year, 100% of the 139 eligible UIWSOM students matched into 16 different healthcare specialties.

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UIWSOM's First-Generation Medical Student Alliance Hosts Mini-Med School Event for High School Students

UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine (UIWSOM) students in the First-Generation Medical Student Alliance (FGMSA) recently invited local high school students to their campus to attend a mini medical school event. The student-led organization represents and advocates for first-generation medical students by fostering a supportive environment that provides accessible resources crucial to personal growth, autonomy and educational advancement.

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UIWSOM Unveils New Campus Amenities to Help Students Combat Stress

Students of the UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine (UIWSOM) have two new spaces to enjoy and utilize to promote their health and wellbeing – a gaming room and fitness center. The sounds of quarterbacks calling plays, and the enthusiastic clicking of controller buttons will now be common sounds in the student lounge on the UIWSOM campus. Last week these new spaces were officially opened by SOM leadership who proudly showcased the school’s new amenities.

UIWSOM Welcomes New Class of Learners at Annual White Coat Ceremony

On Saturday, July 24, the UIW School of Osteopathic Medicine (UIWSOM) officially welcomed its fourth and fifth classes of learners at the annual White Coat Ceremony at the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts.

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The annual White Coat Ceremony welcomes first-year students as colleagues dedicated to patient care, especially for the underserved.

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incarnate word medical school secondary essays

  • 2024 Medical School Secondary Essays Examples

Be Memorable. Claim an interview spot. Get Accepted.

Our team of physician and medical student editors had the pleasure of helping students craft the following medical school secondary essays. 

“Why This School” Essay

Adversity essay, diversity essay, “how will you contribute to our school” essay, “future goals” essay, “academic lapses or breaks” essay, “why d.o.” essay, why are secondaries important, tell us about any specific reason(s) (personal, educational, etc.) why you see yourself here at the wake forest school of medicine..

The ending of the motto of the Moravian church, which has a strong historical connection with Winston-Salem, is “…in all things, love.” This concluding statement is an apt description of how I attempt to live my life. Wake Forest upholds such values of inclusion and love through the Lovefest tradition and programs such as the student-run DEAC Clinic. After working at free clinics in rural areas, I am committed to becoming a physician that will promote systems of care in the community. With my exposure to rural primary care, I want to use the Rural/Underserved Health experience offered to Wake Forest students through the North Carolina Academy of Family Physicians to further my understanding and training in this career path. Furthermore, as an extension of working in primary care, I am interested in being a geriatrician. Wake Forest, as one of the best geriatric hospitals in the country, has a curriculum that aligns with my interests. I am confident that through research, service, and patient care, Wake Forest will shape me into a leader of rural health care for the geriatric community.

Application Status: Accepted |School of choice: Wake Forest School of Medicine | Class of 2024

More Examples and Writing Tips for a Convincing  Medical School “Why Us” Essay | Click Here

Describe a significant challenge you have experienced in your life, share the strategies you employed to overcome the challenge, and what you learned from the experience.

One personal adversity I have overcome is my lack of self-confidence. I was always a quiet child who grew up with two older sisters doing most of the talking. As I aged, I came out my shell to an extent and became more outgoing. I have always struggled in one particular area: public speaking. My passion for medicine grew early as I observed my eldest sister work alongside physicians during her nursing training. However, my shy nature led me to select pre-nursing as my major, since nursing does not require the ability to speak publicly like being a physician often does. I did not truly consider a career as a doctor until my anatomy and physiology professor suggested I do so after recognizing my drive, aptitude, and passion. Even so, it took introspection and time to recognize that I held the potential to become a successful physician.

Over my undergraduate career, I have participated in many group presentations during classes without the benefit of being taught how to successfully prepare. On every occasion, I would become so nervous that I was unable to sleep the entire night prior. By the time I presented, I would be so distracted that I could not think straight, let alone get my point across clearly. This went on until I had the opportunity to participate in a class called Peer Instruction in Laboratory Occupational Training (PILOT), which was an extension of a class that I had succeeded in, Quantitative Biological Methods.

PILOT was designed to expose students to research articles and assist with laboratory techniques and homework. A large part of the grade for the class consisted of teaching a laboratory section of around 40 students for 15 minutes. I almost opted out of the class because of this requirement, but ultimately decided it was a great opportunity to work through my personal fear of public speaking and build my self-confidence.

I set a schedule six weeks ahead of the presentation to begin preparing. A few helpful peers offered advice, telling me that knowing what I wanted to say verbatim was a good way to improve confidence. Thus, I practiced daily until three weeks before the class. I found another tip online: practicing in the actual location of the presentation can help reduce nerves. Subsequently, I approached one of my laboratory teaching assistants and asked if he would let me practice in the laboratory. He was an excellent teaching assistant and took the time to watch me practice and provide feedback.

Ultimately, I felt that I was able to present eloquently and received an excellent grade. Life is full of challenges, and I learned that preparation is key to success. I planned and prepared early, pulled from available resources, and implemented advice from faculty and peers. This experience taught me that I do have the aptitude, strength, and drive to succeed in medical school and overcome any obstacle that I might face. I am eager to embrace more personal growth and realize my full potential as I continue on to medical school.

Application Status: Accepted |School of choice: Nova Southeastern University College Of Osteopathic Medicine | Class of 2024

More Examples and The 6 Steps for Writing the Medical School Adversity Essay | Click Here

incarnate word medical school secondary essays

“Do you consider yourself a person who would contribute to the diversity of the student body of Tufts University School of Medicine?” If yes, briefly explain why.

I am a Muslim, Saudi woman, but I am not the preconceived notions of being close minded, uncultured, or oppressed. I’m a passionate helper, an open-minded extrovert, and a curious explorer of the world. 

Though I grew up attending a school that taught me to be a leader and encouraged competition, and though travelling the world allowed me to explore new cultures, homogeneity was the ‘norm’ everywhere I went until I attended school in the US. George C. Marshall High School showed me how enriching diversity is. There, in a mixture of backgrounds and ethnicities, I was an ‘other’ among many ‘others’. The following year in Nebraska was different, and I experienced the damage of prejudice when I was the only ‘other’. My experiences drove me to work to bring different people together to give back. Years later, at NYU, this personal passion pushed me to create a volunteer tutoring nonprofit organization. 

I believe the ‘other’ in me, with the uncommon background, the unique experiences, and the interesting perspectives, will contribute to the diversity of the student body at Tufts.

Application Status: Accepted |School of choice: Albert Einstein College of Medicine | Class of 2024

Click here for More Examples and Steps on How to Write an Effective Medical School Diversity Essay

Explain how interactions with people who are different from you have shaped your worldview and relate how you would enrich the VTC community.

From my academic and work experiences, I have frequently worked with people who are different from myself. Working with students and professors from different backgrounds through college helped me appreciate different viewpoints, especially during my bioethics training.  Listening to my classmate, who was a Catholic hospice nurse, explain her differing stance on end-of-life care showed me to appreciate the legitimacy of different opinions. Likewise, I learned from sociology graduate students about the issue of the medicalization of mental illness, which I had not had to consider prior to speaking and working with them. These experiences will help me contribute to the community by enabling me to approach problems from multiple lenses and to listen to and value the input of experts in different fields.

My experiences engaging with different individuals will help me to enrich the community at Virginia Tech. As a tutor, I have been able to work with students of different ages and backgrounds with unique learning goals. For example, my student, Danny, was an adult student taking classes at a community college and had failed his statistics course three times before meeting with me. Even though I had excelled in math classes during school, I was able to listen to his frustrations and identify different ways to help him learn the content and be able to apply it for quizzes and exams. I helped him navigate through the material, and he ended up passing the course comfortably. By working with a wide variety of students like Danny, I have been able to understand the importance of listening actively to individuals’ struggles and unique experiences to learn about how to best help them and I am excited to apply this skill to help future individuals.

In addition to my experiences tutoring, I have been able to interact with individuals different from myself through volunteering. For example, at Judson Park, I volunteered by helping one resident, Ron, participate in art therapy. Ron had suffered two prior strokes and was wheelchair-bound and hemiplegic. I was able to help bring him down to the art room and organize supplies for him. Ron was unique in his needs, which was why he required individualized care to be able to participate in the art therapy. He also struggled with communicating verbally due to deficits from his prior strokes. I adapted by patiently waiting for him to respond at his own pace and looking for body language cues for what he needed at the moment. He was able to make incredible art creations, showing me the resilience of differently abled individuals.

These experiences have shown me the importance of valuing everyone’s unique perspectives and utilizing that consideration and compassion to help others. I can enrich the VTC community by providing this diverse perspective to help my peers and ultimately serve the greater community as a physician.

Application Status: Accepted |School of choice: University of Virginia School of Medicine | Class of 2024

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incarnate word medical school secondary essays

After residency, describe the community in which you see yourself practicing medicine.

Currently, I can see myself practicing medicine in a variety of clinical settings: a private specialty care system, a nonprofit medical facility, individual practice, or a different setting. I am open to all of the new experiences that medical school will bring, including exposure to a variety of clinical settings.

I have worked as a medical scribe at the largest non-profit health care provider in Seattle and have also volunteered for a private specialty hospital. Both of these experiences have exposed me to a different type of medical practice, and I have enjoyed both although in different ways. I loved the diversity of patients I encountered at the nonprofit and enjoyed experiencing different clinic visits whether for constipation or throat pain. At the specialty hospital, I was able to encounter unique and rare medical cases that I’ve only read about in books such as spina bifida or hydrocephalus. I was also able to witness the very specialized and personalized care. I am excited to explore the various clinical setting options in medical school and residency, and figure out which environment best suits my strengths and interests!

Application Status: Accepted |School of choice: Stanford School of Medicine | Class of 2024

Use this space if you’d like to address any identified deficiencies in your application.

When I suddenly lost my father to pancreatic cancer shortly before starting college, I was confused and frustrated about my loss. Although I had dreamt of becoming a doctor since I was a little girl, I was newly unsure of whether medicine was right for me. Because I lacked a tangible goal and motivation, my studies and grades suffered during my first years of college. However, once I began volunteering at the Children’s Hospital during my sophomore year, I developed a renewed sense of appreciation and passion for medicine. I started to care a lot more about school and enjoyed learning again. I began working extremely hard in my classes, and slowly but surely, my GPA rose.

Application Status: Accepted |School of choice: Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine   | Class of 2024

How do your professional ambitions align with osteopathic medicine?

My professional ambitions have always aligned with a medical career, ever since I observed my childhood hero and oldest sister, Brittany, work alongside physicians as a registered nurse. At the time, I was only eight years old and not yet privy to the nuances of allopathic versus osteopathic medicine.

Throughout my experiences with the medical profession as a patient and mother, I have found myself disappointed with some of the allopathic medical treatments. I have myself been treated pharmaceutically with medications and became non-compliant with my treatment due to side effects. Several years ago, I was diagnosed with herpetic neuralgia. My neurologist prescription Neurontin, which helped with the symptoms but left me in a fog. I found myself questioning whether there could be a better method.

As an undergraduate student, I was fortunate to have the opportunity to listen to a presentation by a doctor of osteopathy from Lake Eerie College of Medicine in Bradenton, FL. The speaker discussed osteopathic medicine, its principles, and manipulative medicine (OMM). He talked about a time when he bumped into an old friend who had been diagnosed with plantar fasciitis. His friend’s condition was so severe that he needed a cane to ambulate independently. The D.O. performed OMM for his friend and provided him with a set of exercises to perform daily at home. Ultimately, the friend did not require the surgery his allopathic physician had recommended.

After listening to his presentation, I felt as though I had a breakthrough. I realized that I wholeheartedly supported these principles as the better solution that I had been looking for. With osteopathic medicine, I could practice medicine in a traditional manner while wielding a valuable skill set that could spare patients from invasive surgeries and pharmaceutical therapeutics causing undesired side effects.

Furthermore, while studying for the MCAT a year ago, I developed a constant waxing and waning neck pain that would radiate to my right shoulder and down my arm. This worsened over a period of four weeks, and I took increasing amounts of ibuprofen to calm the symptoms. A good friend of mine is a physical therapist who manipulated my spine and sent me home with instructions for an exercise plan. She also taught me how to self-evaluate my posture, which has been valuable in preventing additional episodes. I was incredibly impressed with the outcome of the treatment that used my own body and its muscles to treat the pain without using pharmaceuticals or leaving me with residual deficits. As such, my personal trust in natural treatments has emphasized to me that osteopathic medicine is the path I am meant to follow. 

The more I learn about osteopathic medicine, the more excited I am to incorporate its principles into my future practice. I am thrilled to learn and practice medicine with a holistic approach to evaluate and treat patients. As a healthcare partner to my future patients, I feel inspired to encourage the implementation of prevention, maintenance, and natural remedies into their treatment plans.

Application Status: Accepted |School of choice: Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine   | Class of 2024

Why are secondary essays important?

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  • It’s your final chance to make a strong impression
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Illinois Medical Schools

  • Carle Illinois College of Medicine Secondary Application
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  • Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Secondary Application
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Indiana Medical Schools

  • Indiana University School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application

Iowa Medical Schools

  • Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine Secondary Application

Kansas Medical Schools

  • University of Kansas School of Medicine Secondary Application

Kentucky Medical Schools

  • University of Kentucky College of Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Louisville School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Pikeville- Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application

Louisiana Medical Schools

  • Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine-Louisiana Campus Secondary Application
  • Louisiana State University School of Medicine- New Orleans Secondary Application
  • Louisiana State University School of Medicine- Shreveport Secondary Application
  • Tulane University School of Medicine Secondary Application

Maine Medical Schools

  • University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application

Maryland Medical Schools

  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine Secondary Application
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Massachusetts Medical Schools

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Michigan Medical Schools

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  • Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine Secondary Application
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  • Wayne State University School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Western Michigan University Homer Stryker School of Medicine Secondary Application

Minnesota Medical Schools

  • Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Minnesota Medical School- Duluth Secondary Application
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Mississippi Medical Schools

  • University of Mississippi School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application

Missouri Medical Schools

  • A.T. Still University Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • Saint Louis University School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Missouri School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis Secondary Application 

Nebraska Medical Schools

  • Creighton University School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Nebraska College of Medicine Secondary Application

Nevada Medical Schools

  • Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Medicine Secondary Application
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New Hampshire Medical Schools

  • Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine Secondary Application

New Jersey Medical Schools

  • Cooper Medical School of Rowan University Secondary Application
  • Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine at Seton Hall University Secondary Application
  • Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
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New Mexico Medical Schools

  • Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine at New Mexico State University Secondary Application
  • University of New Mexico School of Medicine Secondary Application

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  • Albany Medical College Secondary Application
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  • Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons Secondary Application
  • Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell Secondary Application
  • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Secondary Application
  • Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at University at Buffalo Secondary Application
  • New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • New York Medical College School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • New York University Long Island School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • New York University School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University Secondary Application
  • State University of New York Downstate Medical Center College of Medicine Secondary Application
  • State University of New York Upstate Medical University College of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine New York Secondary Application
  • University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Secondary Application
  • Weill Cornell Medical College Secondary Application

North Carolina Medical Schools

  • Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University Secondary Application
  • Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • Duke University School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Wake Forest School of Medicine Secondary Application

North Dakota Medical Schools

  • University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences Secondary Application

Ohio Medical Schools

  • Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Northeast Ohio Medical University College of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • The Ohio State University College of Medicine Secondary Application
  • The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences Secondary Application
  • University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine Secondary Application

Oklahoma Medical Schools

  • Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine Secondary Application
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  • Oregon Health Sciences University School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Western University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine Pacific-Northwest Secondary Application

Pennsylvania Medical Schools

  • Drexel University College of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University Secondary Application
  • Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania Secondary Application
  • Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University Secondary Application 
  • University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Secondary Application

Puerto Rico Medical Schools

  • Ponce Health Sciences University School of Medicine Secondary Application
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Rhode Island Medical Schools

  • Alpert Medical School of Brown University

South Carolina Medical Schools

  • Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine-Carolina Campus Secondary Application
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South Dakota Medical Schools

  • Sanford School of Medicine at University of South Dakota Secondary Application

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  • East Tennessee State University Quillen College of Medicine Secondary Application
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Texas Medical Schools

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  • Texas A&M University Health Sciences Center College of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Paul L. Foster School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School Secondary Application
  • The University of Texas Medical Branch School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of North Texas Health Science Center Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Texas Southwestern Medical School Secondary Application
  • University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application

Utah Medical Schools

  • Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine Southern Utah Campus Secondary Application
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Vermont Medical Schools

  • Larner College of Medicine at The University of Vermont Secondary Application

Virginia Medical Schools

  • Eastern Virginia Medical School Secondary Application
  • Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine- Virginia Campus Secondary Application
  • Liberty University College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Virginia School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine Secondary Application

Washington Medical Schools

  • Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine at Washington State University Secondary Application
  • Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • University of Washington School of Medicine Secondary Application

West Virginia Medical Schools

  • Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Secondary Application
  • West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine Secondary Application
  • West Virginia University School of Medicine Secondary Application

Wisconsin Medical Schools

  • Medical College of Wisconsin Secondary Application
  • University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Secondary Application

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Definitive Guide to TMDSAS (2024)

Introduction.

We understand that applying to Texas medical schools can seem like an overwhelming process. However, by understanding more about the application systems, you will realize that applying successfully is not as difficult as it seems. The majority of medical schools in Texas participate in TMDSAS (Texas Medical and Dental Schools Application Service) which is the common medical school application for all state funded medical schools in Texas. However, if you plan on applying to medical schools in Texas, it is likely that you will also apply through at least one other medical school application system depending on how many medical schools you plan on applying to. One Texas allopathic medical school and one Texas osteopathic medical school participates in AMCAS (American Medical College Application Service) and one Texas osteopathic medical school participates in AACOMAS (American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service). The focus of this article will be on TMDSAS.

Which medical school participate in TMDSAS? Below are medical schools listed by type (allopathic or osteopathic) and the application service in which the schools participate.

Table of Contents

Allopathic Medical Schools in Texas that participate in TMDSAS

Allopathic Medical Schools in Texas that participate in TMDSAS

  • Baylor College of Medicine  
  • McGovern Medical School (UT Houston)
  • University of Houston – Fertitta Family College of Medicine
  • Texas A&M University College of Medicine (also uses AMCAS for MD/Phd and non-resident EnMed Applicants)
  • Foster School of Medicine Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso
  • Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine Lubbock
  • Long Medical School (San Antonio)
  • University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School
  • John Sealy School of Medicine University of Texas Medical Branch School of Medicine at Galveston
  • University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine
  • University of Texas Southwestern Medical School
  • University of Texas Tyler

Medical Schools in Texas

Related Article: Medical Schools In Texas

Osteopathic medical school in texas that participates in tmdsas.

Osteopathic Medical School in Texas that participates in TMDSAS

  • Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine – University of North Texas
  • Sam Houston State University College of Osteopathic Medicine

Allopathic Medical School in Texas that participate in AMCAS

Allopathic Medical Schools in Texas that participate in AMCAS

Texas Christian University and the University of North Texas Health Science Center (Burnett School of Medicine at TCU)

Osteopathic Medical School in Texas that participates in AACOMAS

Osteopathic Medical School in Texas that participates in AACOMAS

University of Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine

Applying to Medical Schools in Texas through TMDSAS

Applying to Medical Schools in Texas through TMDSAS

The cost to apply to all Texas medical schools through TMDSAS is a flat rate of $215. Nine TMDSAS medical schools require a secondary application with costs varying from $0-$60.

TMDSAS Application Components

TMDSAS Acceptance Rate, Average MCAT, Average GPA

Entering year 2022 (the most recent data available):

  • 6,833 applicants applied via TMDSAS
  • 3,483 applicants INTERVIEWED via TMDSAS (85% TEXAS RESIDENTS)
  • 2,544 applicants ACCEPTED (89% TEXAS RESIDENTS)
  • 37% of TMDSAS applicants ACCEPTED 
  • 2143 accepted applicants MATRICULATED to TMDSAS medical schools (93% TEXAS RESIDENTS)

It is important to keep in mind, however, that some applicants accepted to Texas medical schools using TMDSAS ultimately choose to attend AMCAS medical schools.

  • Average TMDSAS MCAT for matriculants: 511.7
  • Average overall TMDSAS GPA for matriculants: 3.82
  • Average TMDSAS BCPM GPA matriculants: 3.77

To complete the TMDSAS application, you will need to compose a personal statement, employment and activities entries, as well as two additional essays.

TMDSAS Application Components and Character Limits

What are the written components of the TMDSAS application with characters limits?

  • TMDSAS Personal statement (5000 characters with spaces)
  • TMDSAS Personal characteristics essay (2500 characters with spaces)
  • TMDSAS “optional” essay (2500 characters with spaces)
  • TMDSAS employment and activities entries (300 characters with spaces)
  • TMDSAS three top meaningful activities entries (500 characters with spaces each)

TMDSAS Personal Statement

TMDSAS Personal Statement

The TMDSAS personal statement is one of the most important pieces of your medical school application.

The TMDSAS personal statement prompt is as follows:

Explain your motivation to seek a career in medicine. Be sure to include the value of your experiences that prepare you to be a physician.

This TMDSAS prompt is very similar to the AMCAS personal statement prompt. The TMDSAS personal statement character limit is 5000 characters with spaces whereas the limit for AMCAS is 5300 characters with spaces. Most students use the same essay (with very minor modifications, if necessary) for both application systems.

Relate Article: Successful Med School Personal Statement Examples

Tmdsas additional essays.

TMDSAS Essays

In addition, Texas has two additional essays one of which is required and the other which is optional, but, applicants are encouraged to complete. The TMDSAS personal characteristics essay character limit is 2500 characters with spaces as is the “optional” essay.

TMDSAS Personal Characteristics Essay

TMDSAS Personal Characteristics Essay

Essay Prompt: Learning from others is enhanced in educational settings that include individuals from diverse backgrounds and experiences. Please describe your personal characteristics (background, talents, skills, etc.) or experiences that would add to the educational experience of others.

The personal characteristics essay is a required essay and limited to 2500 characters, including spaces.

When writing this essay have an open mind about what defines diversity. You might have a distinctive interest, background, path, or viewpoint. Try to think outside the box when writing this essay.

TMDSAS Optional Essay

TMDSAS Unique Circumstances or Life Experiences

Essay Prompt: Briefly discuss any unique circumstances or life experiences that are relevant to your application which have not previously been presented. This is not an area to continue your essay or reiterate what you have previously stated; this area is provided for you to address any issues that have not previously been addressed.

The optional essay and limited to 2500 characters, including spaces.

Again, we encourage all applicants to complete this optional TMDSAS essay. Like the personal characteristics essay, think outside the box when writing this essay trying to highlight experiences or circumstances that have been influential to you.

TMDSAS Work and Activities / TMDSAS Employment and Activities Entries

TMDSAS Employment and Activities Entries

The final part of the TMDSAS application is the employment and activities section. Here you will write about all of your experiences, from between high school to August of the application year. “Healthcare and employment activities may be listed in each category if the experience was a paid position; otherwise, do not list experiences in more than one section.” For example, a scribing job would be listed in both Healthcare Activities and Employment.

For each experience entry you are only allowed 300 characters with spaces. The TMDSAS system list your activities in chronological order automatically.

TMDSAS will also generate a “chronology of activities” document automatically that serves as a resume or CV for medical schools. This document contains only the first 50 characters of each description. We do not recommend going overboard to try and make these 50 characters suit the purpose of the chronology.

TMDSAS also asks you to identify three top meaningful activities for which you are allowed 500 characters each.

The Employment and Activities categories are as follows:

  • Academic Recognition
  • Non-Academic Recognition
  • Research Activities
  • Healthcare Activities
  • Community Service
  • Extracurricular & Leisure Activities
  • Planned Activities
  • Identifying Top Meaningful Activities

For University of Incarnate osteopathic medical school, you will complete the AACOMAS application. (the cost for AACOMAS is $196 for one school and $46 for each additional school. Secondary applications are extra and in the same range as AMCAS).

TMDSAS Medical Schools that Require a Secondary Application

TMDSAS Medical Schools that Require a Secondary Application

Texas Medical Schools with Secondary Applications (cost $60 – $100 per school):

  • Baylor College of Medicine
  • UT Southwestern Medical Center
  • Dell Medical School

John Sealy School of Medicine at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

  • UT Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine
  • McGovern Medical School
  • Sam Houston State University
  • Texas A&M University College of Medicine
  • Tilman J. Fertitta Family College of Medicine at University of Houston
  • Texas Tech University HSC School of Medicine
  • The University of North Texas HSC – Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Texas Tech University HSC El Paso Paul L. Foster SOM

TMDSAS Medical Schools that Require Casper

  • Long School of Medicine, UT Health San Antonio
  • University of Texas Southwestern
  • The University of Texas at Tyler

Texas Medical Schools that Use AMCAS

  • Texas A&M University School of Medicine (for MD/PhD and non-resident EnMed Applicants)
  • Anne Burnett Marion School of Medicine at TCU

Texas Medical Schools that Use AACOMAS

  • University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine

TMDSAS Medical School Application Timeline 2019/2020:

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  • May 1, 2023: TMDSAS opens for submission
  • May 15, 2023: TMDSAS applications submitted to medical schools
  • Mid-July: Interviews begin
  • August 1st: Early decision deadline
  • August 15th: All supporting material must be received (transcripts, letters, score for Early Decision applicants)
  • October 1st: Early decision results announced.
  • October 15th: Medical schools begin extending offers.
  • November 1st: Submission deadline for applications.
  • November 15th – January 31st: Prematch offers can be extended to Texas residents only
  • February 2nd: Submission deadline for RANKING of SCHOOL PREFERENCE for the TMDSAS admissions match; must be entered online by 5 p.m. CST
  • February 16th: Match results announced
  • March 3rd: Medical applicants with multiple offers must decide which program to attend and withdraw from other schools
  • April 30th: Medical applicants with multiple offers must decide which program to attend and withdraw from other schools
  • May 15th: Medical schools can no longer make offers to Texas resident applicants holding another seat

Ideally applicants should submit the TMDSAS application as early as possible. TMDSAS application processing takes two to four weeks, and, even though the application system opens May 2nd, the majority of applications are submitted in June (33% of applicants last year).

How does the Texas Medical School Match Work?

How does the Texas Medical School Match Work?

Only Texas residents are eligible for the Texas medical school match.

Between November 15th and December 31st of the application year, medical schools can extend prematch offers to Texas residents. If a student receives multiple offers, he or she can hold those multiple acceptances. Even if a student receives a prematch offer, she must still participate in the Texas match and can match at a higher ranked medical school.

By February 17th, each applicant ranks all of the medical schools at which he or she interviewed. The medical schools then rank the applicants according to preference.

On March 3rd, match results are released. If a student is accepted to a lower ranked school, that student will still remain active at any higher ranked school and can gain admission to those higher ranked medical schools during the rolling admissions process. However, the student will not remain active at any medical school ranked lower than the one to which he matched. This is indeed confusing and TMDSAS has a published video that clarifies the process: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeoLLjkKvng

TMDSAS Letters of Recommendation

TMDSAS Letters of Evaluation

TMDSAS applicants are required to submit either three individual letters of evaluation or a health professions committee letter packet. A letter packet can have more than three letters of evaluation so, if you have more than three letters to send, ideally you should send a letter packet. For individual letters, TMDSAS recommends the following: “It is recommended that your evaluators be current/former professors that can speak to your academic ability in the sciences.”

TMDSAS will also allow you to submit one additional letter of evaluation which you can indicate on the application.

Some Texas medical schools will also allow you to send additional letters directly to the medical schools.

RELATED ARTICLE: Medical School Letters of Recommendation

Tmdsas mcat.

MCAT

MCAT scores, which must be sent directly to TMDSAS, can be up to five years old!

Are you Competitive for Medical School Admissions in Texas?

Are you Competitive for Medical School Admissions in Texas?

When applying to Texas medical schools, it is important to determine if your application is competitive. While researching medical schools, pay attention to the average MCAT scores and GPAs of accepted students, and acceptance rates. If you are considering medical schools in Texas as an out-of-state applicant, it is imperative that you also research what percentage of each entering class is comprised of in-state students. Most medical schools in Texas prioritize in-state applicants, which can make it especially competitive for out-of-state applicants..

So, how difficult is it to get accepted to a Texas medical school? To determine your competitiveness you must consider the average metrics for matriculated students.

  • The average MCAT score for all TMDSAS matriculants was 510.8.
  • The average overall GPA for TMDSAS matriculants was 3.8.
  • The average BCPM GPA for TMDSAS matriculants was 3.73.

As mentioned earlier in this article, only 7% of TMDSAS matriculants were from outside the state. However, when reviewing this data please keep in mind that many students who apply to Texas medical schools opt to attend medical school out of the state.

See the article Medical Schools in Texas for the average MCAT scores and GPAs, interview rates for in state and out of state applicants, acceptance rates, percent of entering class that is in state, and tuition for all medical schools in Texas.

If you want help figuring out how to distinguish yourself, contact MedEdits. We have been working with medical school applicants for more than ten years. This year, our students enjoyed a 93% medical school acceptance rate!

MedEdits Medical Admissions Founder and Chairwoman, Jessica Freedman, MD

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incarnate word medical school secondary essays

HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Learn history of medicine, learn how the medicine provide explanations for birth, death and disease. History of medicine shows how ideas have developed over the centuries, and medicine had arrived at its modern state through the course of history.

Monday, September 26, 2016

Schola medica salernitana: the world's first medical school, the most popular articles.

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incarnate word medical school secondary essays

Hektoen International

A Journal of Medical Humanities

incarnate word medical school secondary essays

Schola Medica Salernitana and medieval medical philosophy

James Marcum Waco, Texas, United States

incarnate word medical school secondary essays

Schola Medica Salernitana fromAvicenna’s Canon of Medicine Biblioteca University, Bologna, Italy

The naissance of Schola Medica Salernitana, or the medical school at Salerno, on the Italian southwest coast is shrouded in myth and controversy. According to one tradition, the school’s beginning dates to Parmenides, a pre-Socratic philosopher who, in 540 BC, founded a medical school in the Greek colony of Elea (called Velia in Latin), located on the coast eighty kilometers south of Salerno. Within this tradition, the medical college at Velia was transferred intact to Salerno. According to another tradition, the school’s origin involved the labor of four founders—Pontus, a Greek; Salernus, a Latin; Adela, an Arab; and Elinus, a Jew—each representing the various cultural influences on the school throughout its history.

What is fact and undisputed is that Schola Medica Salernitana had a major impact on the revival and development of Western medicine. That impact began in the early ninth century when a Benedictine monastery hospital or dispensary opened in Salerno; by the end of the century physicians trained at the medical school were in demand. The medical foundation of the Salerno school was Greek in origin, with Latin translations of both Hippocrates’ and Galen’s writings dominating the medical school curriculum. Constantinus Africanus (ca. AD 1020–1087), who used Arabic sources, was chiefly responsible for these translations. In addition, many of the school’s faculty wrote, often anonymously, important treatises on the practice of medicine, which advanced the school’s reputation. The school flourished from the tenth to twelfth centuries, reaching in the twelfth century its apogee of influence on medicine throughout the known world. By the twelfth century, Salerno merited the title of Hippocratica civitas or city of Hippocrates—as depicted today in its coat-of-arms. One of the crowning achievements of the school was a poem on health, “ Regimen Sanitatis Salernitanum. ”

Just as the founding of Schola Medica Salernitana is controversial and uncertain, so is the origin of the Regimen Sanitatis , or “The Book of Health.” Tradition ascribes the poem’s inception to an anonymous author from the Salerno school during the twelfth century, but recent scholarship contests this genealogy. The original poem was only 362 verses and dealt with diet and hygiene in an opening section, with subsequent sections addressing medicinals or material medica, bodily structure and functions, and treatment options. The poem eventually grew to a final version of 3,520 verses, with the accrual of additional verses on the above topics, as well as on other topics such as disease etiology, pathology, nosology, and semiotics. The poem opens with a dedication to an English king, who, according to tradition, is Robert, the son of William the Conqueror (ca. AD 1028–1087). The king’s son came to Salerno from the Crusades to have a fistula attended. He left with the fistula healed and with a copy of the poem. The poem is not a theoretical manual of medical practice, but rather a practical guide for procuring and maintaining health and well-being. The opening lines of the poem provide an ample summary of its advice towards that end:

incarnate word medical school secondary essays

Regimen Sanitatis Salernitanum , ca. 1480

If thou to health and vigor wouldst attain, Shun weighty cares—all anger deem profane. From heavy suppers and much wine abstain. To rise from table and to take the air. Shun idle, noonday slumber, nor delay The urgent calls of Nature to obey. These rules if thou wilt follow to the end, Thy life to greater length thou mayest extend.

The influence of Hippocrates and Galen are evident throughout the poem, especially in terms of the four humors of disease and health. The poem also gives advice on bloodletting, particularly the best months for conducting the procedure. The influence of the poem is evident from its wide dispersal, with over one hundred known versions and three hundred printed editions.

During the twelfth century, however, a major shift in medicine occurred with the introduction of an Islamic medicine that emphasized the role of critical thought—based on experimentum or experience—in evaluating medical knowledge and practice, particularly in introducing botanical remedies to the medieval pharmacopeia. Islamic medical practitioners were no longer simply interested in commenting practically on the ancient Hippocratic or Galenic texts, but in evaluating them analytically from a theoretical perspective. In other words, the shift represents a move from simply amassing a practical compendium of previous advice and procedures for practicing medicine to fashioning a theoretical commentarium in which the medical faculty revised and expanded the compendium based on the its medical experiences and observations.

Nevertheless, the traditional position of Schola Medica Salernitana remained pragmatic throughout this shift, as evident from the Regimen Sanitatis . Indeed, the Salerno school faculty shunned and eventually rejected the philosophy of Islamic medicine, especially Avicenna’s Canon of Medicine , and held to the practical instructions of Greek and Latin antiquity. Uroscopy best illustrates the Salerno school with respect to rejection of Islamic medicine. For example, Tractatus de Urinis by Maurus Salernitanus (ca. AD 1130–1214), the standard text for analyzing a patient’s urine and teaching students, was profoundly indebted to Galen’s De Urinis .

Although the philosophical approach to medicine at Schola Medica Salernitana remained bound to the Greeks and Latins, other institutions—such as the medical school at Montpellier—incorporated the Islamic approach to medical knowledge and practice. For instance, De Urinarum Judiciis by Aegidius Corboliensis or Giles of Corbeil (ca. AD 1140–1224), a French physician who studied at Salerno, incorporated much of the Islamic spirit of natural philosophical investigation and observation to advance uroscopy; and, his work eclipsed Maurus’ text. Besides the Montpellier school, medical schools in Bologna and Paris also adopted the philosophy of Islamic medicine and led the charge to advance medical knowledge and practice.

The practical approach to medicine—based on traditional Greco-Roman medical philosophy—that fueled Schola Medica Salernitana’s earlier success became antiquated in the light of a new theoretical approach to medicine based on Islamic advances in natural philosophy. Irrespective of its allegiance to an outmoded philosophical approach to medicine, the Salerno school still occupies an important position in the development of Western medicine. Specifically, it was one of the first precursors—if not the first—to modern medical pedagogy and practice, especially in terms of providing a formal curriculum for teaching medical knowledge. Moreover, the literary output of the faculty alone would secure the school a significant position in the development of Western medicine. Besides its reputation for excellence in medical education and practice, the Salerno school also earned repute for the equal opportunities it afforded women to study and practice medicine. Although the impact of the Salerno school diminished over the centuries, beginning in the thirteenth century, the school did not officially close until 1811—certainly a testament to its importance in the history of medicine.

Suggested reading

  • Bynum, W. F. (2008). The history of medicine: A very short introduction . New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Daly, W. J., & Brater, D. C. (2000). Medieval contributions to the search for truth in clinical medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine , 43 , 530–540.
  • De Divitiis, E., Cappabianco, P., & de Divitiis, O. (2004). The “Schola Medica Salernitana”: The forerunner of the modern university medical schools. Neurosurgery , 55 , 722–745.
  • Galdston, I. (1965). The pathogenicity of progress: An essay on medical history. Medical History , 9 , 127–132.
  • Handerson, H. E. (1883). The school of Salernum. An historical sketch of mediæval medicine . New York: s.n.
  • Harrington, John. (1920). The school of Salernum; Regimen sanitatis Salernitanum, the English version, by John Harington; History of the school of Salernum, by Francis R. Packard; and a Note on the prehistory of the Regimen sanitatis, by Fielding H. Garrison . New York: Hoeber.
  • Kristeller, P. O. (1945). The school of Salerno: Its development and its contribution to the history of learning. Bulletin of the History of Medicine , 17 , 138–194.
  • Nutton, V. (2004). Ancient medicine . London: Routledge.
  • Nutton, V. (1971). Velia and the school of Salerno. Medical History , 15 , 1–11.
  • Ordronaux, J. trans. (1870). Regimen sanitatis salernitanum. Code of health of the school of Salernum . Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co.
  • Pasca, M. (1994). The Salerno school of medicine. American Journal of Nephrology , 14 , 478–482.
  • Rashdall, H. (2010). The universities of Europe in the middle ages, vol. 1: Salerno, Bologna, Paris . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

JAMES A. MARCUM , PhD, is professor of philosophy and director of the Medical Humanities Program at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. He earned doctorates in philosophy from Boston College and in physiology from the University of Cincinnati Medical College. He was a faculty member at Harvard Medical School for over a decade before coming to Baylor. His current research interests include the philosophy and history of science and medicine. His recent publications appear in Synthese , Perspectives on Science , History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences , Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences , Perspectives in Biology and Medicine , and Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics . His recent books are An Introductory Philosophy of Medicine: Humanizing Modern Medicine and The Virtuous Physician: The Role of Virtue in Medicine .

Highlighted in Frontispiece  Volume 4, Issue 3 – Summer 2012

Summer 2012

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