49 Opinion Writing Prompts for Students

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opinion essay topics for elementary students

One of the most common essay types is the opinion, or persuasive, essay. In an opinion essay , the writer states a point of view, then provides facts and reasoned arguments to support that viewpoint. The goal of the essay is to convince the reader to share the writer’s opinion.

Students aren't always aware of how many strong opinions they already hold. Use the following opinion writing prompts to inspire them to start thinking and writing persuasively.

Prompts About School and Sports

School- and sports-related topics often elicit strong opinions in students. Use these writing prompts to kick off the brainstorming process.

  • Ch-ch-ch-changes . What is one thing about your school that needs to change? Is bullying an issue? Do students need longer breaks or a dress code? Choose one vital issue that needs to change and convince school leaders to make it happen.
  • Special guest. Your school is trying to decide on a famous person to give a speech or presentation to students. Who do you think they should choose? Write an essay to convince your principal.
  • Oxford or bust. Is the Oxford comma essential or obsolete?
  • Scribble scrabble. Do students still need to learn cursive handwriting?
  • Co-ed conflict. Would students perform better if more schools were single-gender rather than co-ed? Why or why not?
  • Participation awards. Should there be winners and losers in sports, or is participation the ultimate goal?
  • Homework overload. Write an essay to convince your teacher to assign less homework.
  • Sports. Which sport (or team) is the best? What makes it better than the others?
  • No slacking . Write an essay persuading a fellow student to do their homework.
  • Class trip. This year, students get to vote on where to go for a class trip. Write an essay convincing your fellow students to vote for the place you’d like to go.
  • Superlatives. Which would you rather be: a top student, a talented athlete, or an accomplished artist?
  • Virtual athletes . Video games competitions are often aired on TV and treated like sports competitions. Should video games be considered sports?
  • Class debate. Should classes that students may not use or that don’t interest them (such as physical education or foreign language) be required?

Prompts About Relationships

Friendships, dating, and other relationships can be both rewarding and exasperating. These writing prompts about relationships will help students explore their feelings about both the positive and the negative moments.

  • Snitch. Your best friend tells you about his plan to cheat on a test. Should you tell an adult? Why or why not?
  • Give it a chance. Your best friend is convinced that she would hate your favorite book, even though she's never read it. Convince her to read it.
  • Friendships vs. relationships. Are friendships or romantic relationships more important in life? Why?
  • Driving age. What age do kids start driving in your state? Is that age too old, too young, or just right? Why?
  • Truth or consequences. Your best friend asks your opinion about something, but you know that a truthful answer will hurt her feelings. What do you do?
  • Who chooses? Your best friend is visiting, and you want to watch TV together, but his favorite show is at the same time as your favorite show. Convince him that your show is a better choice.
  • Fun times. What is the most fun thing you and your best friend have ever experienced together? Why does it deserve the top spot?
  • Dating. Are long-term dating relationships good or bad for teens?
  • New friends. You want to spend time with a new student at school, but your best friend is jealous. Convince your friend of the importance of including the newcomer.
  • Be mine. Is Valentine’s Day worthwhile or just a scheme for the greeting card and chocolate industry to make more money?
  • Debbie Downer. Should you cut ties with friends or relatives who are always negative?
  • He loves me not. Is it really better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all?
  • Elders. Should you respect your elders merely because they are older, or is respect something that must be earned?

Prompts About Family, Pets, and Leisure Time

The following writing prompts related to family, furry friends, and free time will help students reflect on preferences, ethics, and integrity.

  • Self-reflection. This time, you're the one who needs convincing! Write an essay to persuade yourself to start a healthy habit (or kick a bad habit).
  • Paper wars. Should toilet paper hang with the loose end resting on the top of the roll or hanging from the bottom?
  • Movie vs. book. Choose a book that has been made into a movie. Which version is better, and why?
  • Weekend wanderings . Do you prefer to stay home on the weekends or get out and do things around town? Write an essay to convince your parents to let you do what you prefer this weekend.
  • Sweepstakes. A travel agency is hosting an essay contest to give away an all-expenses-paid trip to the one place in the world you’d most love to visit. Craft a winning essay that convinces them they need to choose you.
  • Zoo debate. Is it ethical to keep animals in zoos? Why or why not?
  • Presence of pets. Should there be limits on the types of places pets can go (e.g. airplanes or restaurants)? Why or why not?
  • Inspiring stories. What is the most inspiring book you’ve ever read? Why is it so inspiring?
  • Dollar discovery. You find a $20 bill in the parking lot of a crowded store. Is it okay to keep it, or should you turn it in to customer service?
  • Vacation day. What is the very best way to spend an unexpected day off from school and why is it the best?
  • Digital or print? Is it better to read books in print or digitally? Why?

Prompts About Society and Technology

The people and technology around us have a significant impact on our lives. These writing prompts encourage students to consider the effect that society and technological advances have on our day-to-day lives.

  • Reverse technology. Pick one technological advancement that you think the world would be better off without. Explain your reasoning and persuade the reader.
  • Out of this world . Do aliens exist? Why or why not?
  • Social media. Is social media good or bad for society? Why?
  • Emoji. Has the use of emoji stunted our ability to express ourselves in writing, or does it help us identify our emotions more precisely?
  • Auto safety. Have advancements like self-driving cars, blind spot indicators, and lane departure warning systems made driving safer, or have they just made drivers less attentive?
  • Exploration Mars. Write a letter to Elon Musk convincing him that you should be part of a colony to Mars.
  • Fundraisers. Is it okay for kids to stand outside stores and ask shoppers for money for their sports teams, clubs, or band? Why or why not?
  • Inventions. What is the greatest invention ever made? Why is it the best?
  • Important cause. In your opinion, what global problem or issue deserves more attention than it currently receives? Why should more time and money be invested in this cause?
  • Minimalism. Does living a minimalist lifestyle make for a happier life? Why or why not?
  • Gaming gains. Are video games generally a positive or a negative influence? Why?
  • Rose-colored glasses. Is the current decade the best era in history? Why or why not?
  • Paper or plastic. Should plastic bags be outlawed?
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100 Best Opinion Writing Prompts for Elementary Students

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Opinion writing prompts were always my favorite when the English teacher would ask us to write on a specific topic in school.

Not only opinion topics are great for finding out what your child or student likes when it comes to a certain topic but also get them to think outside of the box and get creative when writing.

Writing prompts logical, critical, and exploratory thinking .

These opinion writing prompts are also great for middle schoolers, high schoolers, and preschoolers .

Here’s a list of 100 opinion writing prompts suitable for elementary students:

  • Dogs or cats: Which makes a better pet?
  • Should zoos exist?
  • Should animals be kept in captivity?
  • Is it okay to keep exotic pets?
  • Which animal is the best at camouflage?
  • Should people keep fish as pets?
  • Pizza or hamburgers: Which is the tastiest meal?
  • Should students have a longer lunch break?
  • Is breakfast the most important meal of the day?
  • Should candy be banned from school?
  • Do vegetables taste better when they’re fresh or cooked?

Technology:

  • Is playing video games good for kids?
  • Should kids have their smartphones?
  • Is it better to read books or e-books?
  • Should robots do chores for us?
  • Is it important for kids to learn coding?
  • Should homework be abolished?
  • Is school uniform a good idea?
  • Should schools have longer or shorter breaks?
  • Is it important to have art and music classes in school?
  • Should students have a say in what they learn?

Nature and Environment:

  • Should we plant more trees to save the planet?
  • Is recycling important?
  • Should people use bicycles more often instead of cars?
  • Is it important to protect endangered species?
  • Should people use less plastic?

Sports and Activities:

  • Which sport is the most fun to watch?
  • Should kids be required to play a sport?
  • Is it better to play outside or inside?
  • Should everyone learn how to swim?
  • Should schools have more field trips?

Family and Relationships:

  • Should kids have a curfew?
  • Is it important to spend time with family every day?
  • Should kids be allowed to make their own decisions?
  • Should siblings share a room?
  • Should families have regular game nights?

Books and Stories:

  • Which fairy tale character would you like to be?
  • Should kids be allowed to read comic books in school?
  • Should authors write more adventure stories?
  • Is it better to read a book before watching its movie adaptation?
  • Should kids write their own stories?

Health and Fitness:

  • Is it important to exercise every day?
  • Should kids be encouraged to try new sports?
  • Is it better to cook at home or eat out?
  • Should kids be allowed to have dessert every day?
  • Should everyone learn how to cook?

Holidays and Celebrations:

  • Is Halloween the best holiday?
  • Should Valentine’s Day be for everyone, not just couples?
  • Is it better to give or receive gifts?
  • Should people celebrate their birthdays with big parties?
  • Should there be more holidays during the school year?

Travel and Adventure:

  • Should kids have more opportunities to travel?
  • Is it better to go on a beach vacation or a mountain adventure?
  • Should everyone learn how to speak another language?
  • Should people explore outer space?
  • Should kids have to earn a special trip through good behavior?

Movies and Entertainment:

  • Which movie is the funniest of all time?
  • Should kids be allowed to watch TV every day?
  • Is it better to watch movies at home or in a theater?
  • Should kids be allowed to watch scary movies?
  • Should there be more movies about animals?

Community and Citizenship:

  • Should kids volunteer in their community?
  • Should everyone recycle and pick up litter?
  • Is it important to vote when you’re old enough?
  • Should kids learn about famous historical figures?
  • Should kids be involved in making decisions in their neighborhoods?

Dreams and Imagination:

  • If you could have any superpower, what would it be?
  • Should kids be allowed to dream big?
  • Is it important to have imaginary friends?
  • Should kids be encouraged to write their own stories?
  • Should there be more magical creatures in the world?

Art and Creativity:

  • Is it important to take art classes?
  • Should kids be allowed to create their own inventions?
  • Is it better to paint or draw?
  • Should kids have more opportunities to perform on stage?
  • Should there be more public art in our city?
  • Should kids learn how to play a musical instrument?
  • Is it better to listen to music or make your own?
  • Should schools have more music programs?
  • Should kids have to practice their instrument every day?
  • Should kids be allowed to sing in the classroom?
  • Should kids be allowed to wear whatever they want to school?
  • Is it important to follow fashion trends?
  • Should everyone wear uniforms?
  • Should kids be allowed to dye their hair any color?
  • Should clothes be more comfortable or stylish?

Safety and Rules:

  • Should kids always wear helmets when riding bikes?
  • Is it important to follow rules even when no one is watching?
  • Should kids be allowed to cross the street alone?
  • Should there be stricter rules for using the internet?
  • Should kids be allowed to walk to school by themselves?

Transportation:

  • Is it better to travel by car or by plane?
  • Should everyone use public transportation more often?
  • Should there be more bike lanes in the city?
  • Is it important to walk or bike to school instead of taking the bus?
  • Should people use electric cars instead of regular cars?
  • Should kids be allowed to earn money by doing chores?
  • Is it important to save money?
  • Should kids have their bank accounts?
  • Should everyone learn how to budget and manage money?

Feel free to use these prompts to spark creativity and encourage thoughtful opinion writing among elementary students! “Opinion Writing Prompts for Students

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20 Prompts for Opinion Writing That Motivate Kids

Opinion Blog Post

When using prompts for opinion writing, students can express themselves and share their beliefs.  This automatically makes them more invested in their writing.  Read on to learn more about opinion writing including mentor texts, ideas, and assessments.  Plus you will find 20 prompts that will be sure to motivate and engage kids!

What is an Opinion Writing?

Opinion writing is used to convince or persuade the reader. The writer states their opinion and gives reasons to support it.  Facts or statistics can be used to provide supporting evidence. 

Examples for Opinion Writing

There are lots of helpful examples for opinion writing.  Below you will find a list of mentor texts for kids.  It’s beneficial to immerse students in the genre before and during a writing unit.  These books model effective writing strategies that can be incorporated into lessons.

Opinion Writing Mentor Text:

  • I Love Insects by Lizzy Rockwell
  • The Perfect Pet by Margie Palatini 
  • The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt 
  • Hey, Little Ant by Phillip and Hannah Hoose
  • Red is Best by Kathy Stinson
  • I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orloff 
  • Earrings by Judith Viorst
  • The Great Kapok Tree by Lynne Cherry

teachers-writing-guide

How to Teach Opinion Writing

It’s important for students to form their own opinions and understand their feelings.  So often kids just follow the opinion of someone else whether it be a parent, sibling, or friend.  Now is the time for kids to firmly state their opinion and not waver from it.  

Writers will need to give reasons for their opinion and provide supporting examples.  The number of reasons will depend on the grade level and the student’s abilities.  For first graders, you might require only one reason while third graders may need three reasons.  Decide what works best for your learners and create modifications as needed. 

Opinion Writing Outline

Below you will find an acronym to help students plan their opinion writing. They just need to remember the word OREO. It stands for opinion, reasons, examples, and opinion (restated again). For each reason given, a sentence follows with evidence or an example. This is a more detailed approach to writing a response. It works well for the upper grades or advanced students. Depending on the level, some writers may just be working on providing reasons and will later develop the skill of using supporting examples.

ideas-for-opinion-writing

The example below uses one reason with supporting evidence. For each reason, the student should write an example. The acronym might look like OREREO for two reasons or OREREREO for three reasons. A little confusing, but you get the idea.

Example: Do you think teachers should give students homework?

O – In my opinion, students should not have homework.

R – They work so hard all day at school and need a break. 

E – Instead of focusing on more work kids should be able to go outside and play, do a sport, or do other fun activities.  

O – In conclusion, students work all day at school and should not have to do homework.

Sentence Starters

As students write, it may also be helpful to use sentence starters. Teachers can project these on the board, put them on an anchor chart, or print a version for writing notebooks. I also like to do a mini-lesson where I ask the kids what types of sentence starters work well for opinion writing and we create the list together. This process helps them retain the information better and they are more likely to apply it to their own writing.

ideas-for-opinion-writing

Ideas for Opinion Writing

There are so many fun and creative ideas for opinion writing.  Kids really get into this writing unit because they feel that their opinion is valued and they are eager to share their knowledge.  It’s really empowering for them!

As an activity, the teacher can present a topic to the class and have students choose a side.  Then kids can debate and state their opinion with reasons.  This is always an exciting way to get the creative juices flowing and it will translate into their writing when they have to support their opinion.

Another idea is to use prompts for opinion writing. This engages the students and helps them get started. Prompts can be assigned by the teacher or students can choose from a list or choice board. Feel free to use the sentence starters below to generate ideas for writing prompts.

  • Would you rather . . . 
  • Which is more important . .  
  • Do you prefer . . . 
  • What is the best . . .
  • What is your favorite . . . 
  • Should . . .
  • Imagine if . . . 

Prompts for Opinion Writing

Opinion writing prompts can be created by the teacher or the students. Sometimes students come up with better prompts than I ever could. Plus kids love knowing that a peer created the prompt they are going to write about. If you’re looking for some ideas, the list below has 20 motivating and engaging prompts for kids! Also, check out this blog post to learn more about narrative writing prompts: 20 Prompts for Narrative Writing That Spark Creativity

20 Motivating and Engaging Prompts:

  • If you could only eat one food for the rest of your life, what would it be?  Give 3 or more reasons why.
  • Should students be able to pick their own seats in class?
  • Think of a present you really want.  Now convince someone to buy it for you.
  • What is the best pet someone can get?
  • Would you rather live somewhere that’s extremely hot or cold?
  • Which sport is the best?  Give reasons to support your opinion.
  • If you could visit any place, what would it be and why?
  • Would you rather live on a rural farm or in a busy city?
  • Imagine you could be the President for a day.  What would be the most important thing to do first?
  • Which is more important?  Being a good speaker or a good listener?
  • If the weather is nice, should kids be able to have their classes outside?
  • Do you think kids should have more technology time or less?
  • If you could see the world through colored glasses, which color would you choose and why?
  • Should kids get money for doing chores or should they just do it to help out at home?
  • Convince your teacher to get a class pet.  Tell which animal would be the best choice and why.
  • Would you rather visit the moon or a planet?  Explain why.
  • If there could only be one season, which would you choose?
  • Should kids get to choose their own bedtime?
  • Would you rather give a present or receive it?
  • Imagine you could create the best dessert ever!  What would it be and why?

prompts-for-opinion-writing

Opinion Writing Rubrics

After students have completed their writing, teachers are left with the difficult task of assessing it.  Assessments should be accurate and aligned with the Common Core Standards.  They also need to be helpful for the teacher and the students.  

This is when writing rubrics become extremely helpful as formal assessments. They can be used for benchmarks, progress reports, report cards, and conferences. Rubrics may also be shown to students in advance so they know what the expectations are and how they will be assessed.  

Below you will find three types of opinion writing rubrics.  Check out this blog post to learn more about student-friendly, teacher-friendly, and time-saving rubrics: 3 Types of Writing Rubrics for Effective Assessments

opinion-writing-rubrics

Opinion writing has the ability to engage and empower kids.  Students will be able to explain their thinking by giving reasons and examples.  Mentor texts, sentence starters, writing prompts, and rubrics are all helpful to use in the classroom. I know your kids will love writing and sharing their opinion pieces.

Did you grab your Free Writing Prompt Guide yet?  Writing prompts are perfect for morning work, writing time, centers, or as a homework assignment.  It will save you tons of time and energy. So click the link and grab the guide to get started!

Genre Based Prompts

prompt-for-narrative-writing

Related Articles:

  • 20 Prompts for Narrative Writing That Spark Creativity
  • 7 Ways to Introduce Opinion Writing
  • Opinion Writing Ideas and Resources
  • 3 Easy to Implement Tips to Teach Opinion Writing

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Thanks for sharing. These are my favorite type of writing prompts to give to my students to see how creative they can get.

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Yes! These kinds of prompts definitely get the creative juices flowing. The students always love to share their opinions with the class. Happy writing!

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72 Fun Opinion Writing Prompts that Students Will WANT to Write About!

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Kids love to tell you what they think and opinion writing is the perfect outlet for them to do it appropriately . These elementary opinion writing prompts will have your students wanting to write so they can tell you exactly what they think about topics that are relevant and interesting to them!

Opinion writing is the perfect way to introduce the more formal persuasive writing genre. It allows students to practise developing and justifying their own ideas before requiring a multi-paragraph essay with multiple pieces of evidence, proof or examples.

Want this list of prompts dropped straight into your inbox? Sign up below to get all these opinion writing topics in a hand PDF, ready to be printed and cut out for the perfect writing centre or writer’s workshop task!

72 FUN OPINION WRITING PROMPTS IN YOUR INBOX!

Get a FREE printable PDF version of all the opinion writing topic ideas in this post! Be sure to use a personal email address to make sure it gets to you!

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FUN & GAMES OPINION WRITING IDEAS

From table games, to sports and TV & entertainment, your students will love to write an opinion paragraph on these interesting topics!

  • What is the best game to play with friends? Why?
  • Are card or dice games better? Why?
  • Which are better – indoor or outdoor recesses? Why?
  • If you could plan the ultimate weekend, what would it look like and why?
  • What is your favourite TV show? Why?
  • In your opinion, who is the best actor in the world? Why?
  • What sport is your favourite to watch? Why?
  • What is the best board game to play with friends? Why?
  • Do you think that school sports are important? Why or why not?
  • At what age do you feel children should be allowed social media? Why?
  • Would you rather sing or dance in front of an audience? Why?
  • How do you feel about video games? Explain.

FRIENDS & FAMILY OPINION WRITING TOPICS

Asking students to write about familiar topics is important for developing confidence and there is nothing students know better than their own family and friends. This category is full of opinion writing topics that your students are sure to already have strong thoughts about.

  • What is your favourite activity to do with your family and why?
  • If you could plan your next family vacation, where would you go and what would you do? Why?
  • Would you rather have brothers or sisters? Explain your reasoning.
  • Do you think children should receive an allowance? Justify your thinking.
  • If you had to do one chore every day until you grow up, which one would you choose? Why?
  • Would you rather your friends think of you as funny, kind or smart? Why?
  • Should kids have to help around the house? Explain why or why not.
  • How many siblings is the perfect number? Why?
  • Where would you like to go with your friends: the zoo, the movies or the skatepark? Why?
  • What qualities make a really great friend? Describe each quality and explain why it is important.
  • What, in your opinion, makes you a good friend? Explain.
  • What do you think is the best thing about your family? Why?

Student hand holding pencil over blank writing paper choosing opinion writing prompts.

SCHOOL FUN OPINION WRITING PROMPTS

The key to a topic being interesting is that it is relevant to students. The school category gives students the chance to tell you how they feel about favourite subjects, homework and more with entertaining topics for opinion paragraphs.

  • What is the best subject in school? Why?
  • Which subject is the worst? Why?
  • Should students receive grades? Why or why not?
  • Should teachers give homework? Justify your opinion.
  • Do you think college and university should be free? Why or why not?
  • Which subject is the most important? Why?
  • What is your opinion on school uniforms? Explain your thinking.
  • What one book do you think all students should have to read? Why?
  • What is one subject you would like to see added at school and why?
  • What qualities make a great teacher? Describe each quality and explain why it is important.
  • What is your opinion on watching movies at school? Explain your thoughts.
  • Do you believe that school sports should be mandatory for all students? Why or why not?

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NATURE & ADVENTURE TOPICS FOR OPINION WRITING

This category will have students thinking about the world around them from serious topics such as environmental issues to fun outdoor activities. Choose from simple preferences between types of environments to really imaginative topics like the animal trait they would most like to have.

  • Would you choose beach or mountains? Why?
  • What is your favourite outdoor activity? Why?
  • Which season is the best? Why?
  • What unusual animal do you think would make the best pet and why?
  • What is your opinion on global warming?
  • Would you rather hike to a waterfall or ancient ruins? Explain your opinion.
  • Which animal is the scariest? Why?
  • How do you feel about camping and why?
  • Would you rather go bungee jumping or swim with sharks? Why?
  • What do you think is the most important thing we should do for the environment and why?
  • What animal skill or trait would you most like to have and why?
  • What is your opinion on zoos? Why?

72 ELEMENTARY OPINION WRITING PROMPTS

Get a FREE printable PDF version of all the opinion writing topics in this post – an instant writers’ workshop activity! Be sure to use a personal email address to make sure it gets to you!

FOOD & DRINK OPINION WRITING PROMPTS

Let students write opinion paragraphs about their favourite, and least favourite, foods and drinks. Some writing topics are fun and others are more philosophical. Many could make for a great verbal debate too!

  • What is your favourite snack? Describe it and explain why it is your favourite.
  • If you had the choice, what is one food you would never eat again? Why?
  • If you could, what food would you happily eat for every meal?
  • Do you prefer hot or cold drinks? Why?
  • Would you choose vegetables or salad? Explain your decision.
  • Invent the perfect dessert. Describe it and explain why it is so great.
  • Should people be vegetarians? Why or why not?
  • If you had to eat one vegetable every day for the rest of your life, which one would you choose and why?
  • Describe your perfect meal and explain why.
  • At what age should drinking alcohol be legal? Justify your opinion.
  • Is a hot dog a sandwich? Why or why not?
  • Does pineapple belong on pizza? Justify your opinion.

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MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS FOR OPINION WRITING

There really is no end to fun opinion writing prompts for elementary grades. Here I’ve created 12 bonus writing prompts that are full of writing ideas from aliens to cellphones.

  • Do you think aliens exist? Why or why not?
  • What is the hardest job in the world? Explain your thinking.
  • At what age do you think people should be able to drive? Justify your opinion.
  • Would you rather go to the moon or Mars? Why?
  • If you were running the country for a day, what law would you change and why?
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33 Mentor Texts for Opinion Writing

Show kids how powerful sharing ideas in writing can be.

Mentor Texts feature image

In today’s world, we want our teaching to inspire students to be forward thinkers and changemakers. Teaching them how to share their opinions in writing is a key ingredient. Let’s get kids making signs and writing letters, lists, reviews, essays, blog posts, and speeches! Check out some of our favorite opinion-writing mentor texts to bring this important genre to life for kids. We’ve got plenty of picture books for the younger set, and titles to help older kids make the leap to persuasive writing backed by researched facts.

(Just a heads up, WeAreTeachers may collect a share of sales from the links on this page. We only recommend items our team loves!)

1. We Disagree by Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Book cover for We Disagree as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

A mouse and a squirrel think differently about, well, everything. Can they ever be friends? This is such a cute title for introducing kids to what it means to share an opinion, and it could lead to plenty of writing prompts to open an opinion-writing unit.

Buy it: We Disagree on Amazon

2. I Love Insects by Lizzy Rockwell

Book cover for I Love Insects as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

This early reader should definitely be in your primary classroom collection of opinion-writing mentor texts to help introduce the genre. Do you love insects? Two kids give competing reasons for why and why not. Read it aloud and head straight into shared writing of a list of pros and cons.

Buy it: I Love Insects on Amazon

3. Usha and the Big Digger by Amitha Jagannath Knight

Book cover for Usha and the Big Digger as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

To introduce kids to opinion writing, you need opinion-writing mentor texts to teach them what “opinions” are—and Usha, Aarti, and Gloria have them in this book! They each see something different when they look at the stars. This book could lead to a great introduction activity in which students try to convince each other that they see the Big Dipper, a “Big Digger,” a “Big Kite …” or something else. (Hint: It’s all in your perspective!)

Buy it: Usha and the Big Digger on Amazon

 4. Don’t Feed the Bear by Kathleen Doherty

Book cover for Don't Feed the Bear as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

When a park ranger puts up a “Don’t Feed the Bear” reminder, he has no idea about the persuasive sign-writing battle he’ll set in motion. (Strategic language includes “Please feed the ranger rotten eggs and slimy spinach.”) Share this hilarious title to introduce students to using signs to influence others’ thinking.

Buy it: Don’t Feed the Bear on Amazon

5. Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems

Book cover for Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

Let a favorite character guide young students in the art of persuasion. The bus driver does not want Pigeon in the driver’s seat, but the well-known bird builds an emotional and unrelenting case.

Buy it: Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! on Amazon

6. Our Favorite Day of the Year by A.E. Ali

Book cover for Our Favorite Day of the Year

We adore sharing this book with young students to open inclusive conversations about favorite holidays and traditions. Each student in Musa’s class shares about their favorite day of the year, from Eid Al-Fitr to Pi Day. Use this book to prompt kids to write their own opinion pieces about their favorite days, and to model how reasoning, information, and anecdotes can support one’s opinion.

Buy it: Our Favorite Day of the Year on Amazon

7. Kamala and Maya’s Big Idea by Meena Harris

Book cover for Kamala and Maya's Big Idea

This true story from Kamala Harris’ childhood details how she and her sister wrote letters to their landlord until he agreed to let them build a playground in their apartment complex courtyard. Get kids excited about how their opinion writing could create real change!

Buy it: Kamala and Maya’s Big Idea on Amazon

8. If I Were President by Trygve Skaug

Book cover for If I Were President

A young boy talks at length about what he’d do differently if he ran the country. Maybe cars could run on legs instead of gasoline, and “playing” should be a subject taught in school. Share this with kids who need more ideas for opinion-writing topics!

Buy it: If I Were President on Amazon

9. The Little Book of Little Activists by Penguin Young Readers

Book cover for The Little Book of Little Activists as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

Introduce young students to the idea of activism and its connection to opinion writing. This inspiring photo essay includes examples of kids’ opinions about real-life causes and many written signs.

Buy it: The Little Book of Activists on Amazon

10. The Big Bed by Bunmi Laditan

Book cover for The Big Bed as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

This protagonist is a toddler on a mission—a mission to kick her dad out of her parents’ bed so she can sleep with her mom. Use this little girl’s precocious modeling to show students how to polish their own opinion writing by adding visual supports.

Buy it: The Big Bed on Amazon

11. The Perfect Pet by Margie Palatini

Book cover for The Perfect Pet as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

Elizabeth crafts a plan to convince her parents to let her have a pet, with unexpected—but pleasing—results. This is our favorite opinion-writing mentor text for introducing kids to win-win solutions and encouraging them to suggest them in their own opinion writing.

Buy it: The Perfect Pet on Amazon

12. & 13. Can I Be Your Dog? and I Found a Kitty! by Troy Cummings

Book cover for Can I Be Your Dog? as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

First, read a collection of persuasive letters from a lonely dog seeking an owner that’s a twist on kids’ pet requests. Each letter is tailored to a specific audience, with Arfy promising to lick things clean, protect, and deliver endless affection.

In the sequel, Arfy uses his persuasive skills to help someone else, a lovable stray kitten. Notice with students how he once again shapes his reasoning for each recipient—and how he doesn’t give up until he’s successful!

Buy it: Can I Be Your Dog? on Amazon

Buy it: I Found a Kitty! on Amazon

14. True You: A Gender Journey by Gwen Agna and Shelley Rotner

Book cover for True You: A Gender Journey

This delightful and important title stars real kids with a full range of gender identities. Each child introduces themselves in a speech bubble that shares their opinion about gender identity. Use this title to model talking to the reader using strong, direct language.

Buy it: True You: A Gender Journey on Amazon

15. Stella Writes an Opinion by Janiel Wagstaff

Book cover for Stella Writes an Opinion as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

Sometimes you want perfectly straightforward opinion-writing mentor texts that match right up with your teaching goals. Stella thinks second graders should be able to have a morning snack time. She sets out to write about her opinion, state her reasons, and ends with a compelling summation.

Buy it: Stella Writes an Opinion on Amazon

16. I Wanna New Room by Karen Kaufman Orloff

Book cover for I Wanna New Room as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

After his successful angling for a pet in I Wanna Iguana , Alex tries using note-writing to broach his next request: a room of his own, away from his pesky younger brother. The parent-child communication includes plenty of examples of making and responding to counterarguments.

Buy it: I Wanna New Room on Amazon

17. Be Glad Your Dad … Is Not an Octopus! by Matthew Logelin and Sara Jensen

Book cover for Be Glad Your Dad is Not an Octopus! as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

This author’s opinion is that you should appreciate your dad for who he is. He makes his case with plenty of arguments grounded in facts—facts that show that if your dad were an animal, he could be even more gross, embarrassing, or annoying!

Buy it: Be Glad Your Dad … Is Not an Octopus! on Amazon

18. Earrings! by Judith Viorst

Book cover for Earrings! as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

A young girl desperately wants her ears pierced, but her parents respond to her begging with a firm no. Ask students to evaluate the merits of her various arguments. Which are strong? Which are just whiny?

Buy it: Earrings! on Amazon

19. Pick a Picture, Write an Opinion! by Kristen McCurry

Book cover for Pick a Picture, Write an Opinion! as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

If you’re looking for opinion-writing mentor texts that lay it all out there explicitly, you’ll appreciate this resource. Engaging, diverse photos and topics, a kid-friendly tone, and explicit advice make this a helpful primer to accompany more conventional mentor texts.

Buy it: Pick a Picture, Write an Opinion! on Amazon

20. I Hate My Cats (A Love Story) by Davide Cali

Book cover for I Hate My Cats (A Love Story) as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

This narrator has plenty of reasons to dislike his self-centered cats, which he outlines in specific detail. Use this title as an example of a multi-pronged argument. (Plus, show that sometimes, opinion writing actually leads us to change our own minds. By the end, the owner realizes he actually loves his pets, quirks and all.)

Buy it: I Hate My Cats (A Love Story) on Amazon

21. I Can Be Anything! Don’t Tell Me I Can’t by Diane Dillon

Book cover for I Can Be Anything! Don't Tell Me I Can't as an example of mentor texts for opinion writing

Zoe makes big plans for her future, from being an archaeologist to a veterinarian. She quiets self-doubt with confident arguments. Aside from sharing this title’s lovely, affirming message, use it to teach kids to anticipate tough questions and head them off convincingly in their opinion writing.

Buy it: I Can Be Anything! Don’t Tell Me I Can’t on Amazon

22. Rise Up and Write It by Nandini Ahuja

Book cover for Rise Up and Write It

Farah Patel works to convince her local government to improve a vacant lot to benefit her community. Great realistic examples of using letters and signs to inspire change!

Buy it: Rise Up and Write It on Amazon

23. The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt

Book cover for The Day the Crayons Quit as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

These disgruntled but endearing crayons have opinions, and they aren’t shy about making them known in this read-aloud favorite. Check out this free downloadable educator guide from the publisher for persuasive letter-writing curriculum connections.

Buy it: The Day the Crayons Quit on Amazon

24. Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist by Jess Keating

Book cover for Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean's Most Fearless Scientist as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

The best opinion writing springs from genuine conviction. Eugenie Clark believed sharks were fascinating and  that women could be accomplished scientists who study them. Use this title to help students generate their own passion-fueled topics about which to write.

Buy it: Shark Lady on Amazon

25. What Can a Citizen Do? by Dave Eggers

Book cover for What Can a Citizen Do?

Share this title for its inspiring message about the power of one citizen to evoke positive change through spoken words, writing, and action. Also consider it as an example of how words and art interact in opinion writing; the illustrations and text work together here to advance the book’s message.

Buy it: What Can a Citizen Do? on Amazon?

26. Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest by Sarah Hampson

Book cover for Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest

Dr. Archibald Coo believes that pigeons don’t deserve their reputation as avian pests. He outlines a plan to change the minds of his city neighbors. Part of his approach is to send a persuasive letter to the mayor, suggesting creative, mutually beneficial agreements—a great example for student writers aiming to change the minds of authority figures.

Buy it: Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest on Amazon

27. The Great Kapok Tree by Lynne Cherry

Book cover for The Great Kapok Tree

The animals in this classic read-aloud give a range of reasons their home shouldn’t be chopped down. Use them as examples of how to vary sentence structures and formats when listing arguments and how to use specific details to strengthen reasoning.

Buy it: The Great Kapok Tree on Amazon

28. Let the Children March by Monica Clark-Robinson

Book cover for Let the Children March

This fictional account of the Birmingham Children’s Crusade, told from the point of view of a young participant, is a classroom must-read. It exemplifies how children’s actions can make a difference in an adult world and how powerful language strengthens a written message.

Buy it: Let the Children March on Amazon

29. No Voice Too Small: Fourteen Young Americans Making History edited by Lindsay H. Metcalf, Keila V. Dawson, and Jeanette Bradley

Book cover for No Voice Too Small: Fourteen Young Americans Making History

This powerful title introduces inspiring and diverse young activists’ causes using original poems by notable authors. Show kids that impactful opinion writing can take many forms.

Buy it: No Voice Too Small on Amazon

30. The Week Junior magazine “Big Debate” feature

Covers for The Week Junior magazine

The Week Junior is one of our absolute favorite magazines for the classroom , and its “Big Debate” section is a main reason for that. Each issue examines both sides of an interesting topic, from whether we should eat Maine lobster, to if space exploration is worth the huge cost, to whether or not kids’ screen time should be restricted. Have kids study examples to get tips for their own opinion writing, and maybe even create their own “Big Debate.”

Buy it: The Week Junior

31. Planet Ocean: Why We All Need a Healthy Ocean by Patricia Newman

Book cover for Planet Ocean: Why We All Need a Healthy Ocean as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

This is a fantastic resource for upper elementary and middle school classrooms moving from opinion writing to research-based persuasive writing. This mind-boggling look at the impact of trash on our oceans gives kids so many models for sharing one’s opinions, experiences, and knowledge to spark change. Embedded QR codes take readers straight to awesome examples of persuasive speeches and other cool resources that support the author’s message.

Buy it: Planet Ocean: Why We All Need a Healthy Ocean on Amazon

32. We Are Still Here! Native American Truths Everyone Should Know by Traci Sorell

Book cover for We Are Still Here!: Native American Truths Everyone Should Know

A classroom prepares to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day with research projects that convey a clear message: Native Nations are still here! Besides being critical content for kids, this is a great example of how to use researched facts to support one’s opinion.

Buy it: We Are Still Here! on Amazon

33. Marley Dias Gets It Done and So Can You! by Marley Dias

Book cover for Marley Dias Gets It Done and So Can You!

Every middle school student should meet Marley Dias through this powerful account of her #1000blackgirlbooks campaign. It boasts plenty of practical advice for young activists. Pull text excerpts for mini-lessons about tailoring opinion writing to your audience. Marley writes straight to her peers.

Buy it: Marley Dias Gets It Done and So Can You! on Amazon

Excited to share these opinion-writing mentor texts? Also check out our favorite mentor texts for procedural and narrative writing.

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Examples of mentor texts including My Papi has a Motorcycle and Soul Food Sunday

32 Best Mentor Texts for Narrative Writing in Elementary School

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opinion essay topics for elementary students

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Teaching opinion writing tips and activities.

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Today, you’re going to get a bunch of teaching opinion writing tips. I’m going to what best practices I think you can follow. I hope that you’re going to walk away with a clear understanding of what is expected when teaching this standard. I also hope you walk away with some fun ideas and activities to add to your lesson plans! All of the images you see below (except for the read-alouds) are part of my ELA writing units. The links to all grade levels are at the bottom!

Let’s dive into the opinion writing standards

Common Core writing domain focuses on three big types of writing:  informative, narrative, and today’s topic OPINION WRITING! It begins kindergarten and each year, gets progressively more in depth and detailed. Here is a look at K-5’s expectations for opinion writing, according to Common Core.

  • Kinder: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is.. .).
  • 1st: Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion and provide some sense of closure.
  • 2nd: Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because , and , also ) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section.
  • 3rd: Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. (a- Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.) (b- Provide reasons that support the opinion.) (c- Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because , therefore , since , for example ) to connect opinion and reasons.) (d- Provide a concluding statement or section.)
  • 4th: Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. (a- Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.) (b- Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.) (c- Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance , in order to , in addition ).) (d- Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.)

Outline of how to teach opinion writing…

  • What is opinion writing?
  • How do I state an opinion?
  • Supporting your opinion
  • Introductions explicit teaching
  • Conclusions explicit teaching
  • Provide lots of practice

If you teach opinion writing broken up in parts like this, your students can focus on each part. That way, they can get a true grasp of what each piece requires and how to write it.

Load up on Mentor Texts

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Every single part of this blog post will include mentor texts. Each time you teach your students about a component of opinion writing, use a strong example! Mentor texts are great because students can see what they’re learning in engaging or familiar books. Then, it can help them with their own practice. Each of the book links below are affiliate links to Amazon.

  • Hey Little Ant by Phillip and Hannah Hoose
  • I Don’t Want to Be a Frog by Dev Petty
  • My Teacher for President by Kay Winters
  • The Perfect Pet by Margie Palatini
  • I Wanna New Room by Karen Kaufman Orloff
  • I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orloff
  • The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka
  • The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt
  • Red is Best by Kathy Stinson
  • Earrings by Judith Viorst
  • Don’t Let Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems
  • Click, Clack, Moo by Doreen Cronin

First, teach WHAT Opinion Writing is

opinion essay topics for elementary students

When you begin your opinion writing unit, you of course need to start with teaching them what it is. You will be showing them the framework of an opinion writing piece. First, create an anchor chart (or use one provided to you in my ELA units). Then, as you explore texts, examples, and activities, you can refer back to this anchor chart to teach opinion writing framework.

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Now, it’s time to get the students talking. Give them an engaging partner talk game, such as Stand Up, Hand Up, Pair Up or Mix-Pair-Share. When they’re with a partner, ask them questions about the actual framework. Ask them the purposes of each component. This will help strengthen their writing when it’s time to start writing independently.

opinion essay topics for elementary students

After that, you can start showing them real-world examples. Start with read-alouds and mentor texts. See if students can identify the introduction, opinion sentence, support, and conclusion. Then, give them examples that aren’t tied to a picture book. Above, you see two different activities. One of them asks students to put a puzzle together of sample sentences for each component. The other is a cut-and-glue activity where they have to sort sample sentences. (Links to all resources are at the bottom of the blog post.)

Stating an Opinion

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Next, it’s time to simply teach them how to state an opinion. If you’re in kinder or first grade, you may have to take a step back and teach what an opinion is and how it’s different from a fact. But… once that’s determined, you can start teaching opinion sentences.

Make a class anchor chart or display a stem poster in your classroom. This will help trigger their ability to form an opinion sentence. Then, give them a few engaging partner activities. For example, the image above shows a partner game where students are shown an Opinion Stem chart and one picture topic card at a time. They will form an opinion sentence about that topic using a different stem each time.

opinion essay topics for elementary students

It’s also important to teach your writers the difference between strong and weak opinion sentences. There is a big difference between “I like pizza” and “Pizza is my favorite dinner”. One way to practice this is to have students sort different sample sentences into the strong and weak categories.

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Then, it’s time to let them practice! Try using one of the templates in the ELA unit like the one shown above. It gives students a collection of sentence stems and a topic. They will have to form an opinion sentence using a mixture of all these options!

Dive deeper with reasons

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Once you get into second, third, fourth grade (and above), you’re going to be required to teach students how to support their opinion. The big thing that can really help is just the word ‘why’. This helps trigger students to think of the reasons behind their opinion. Once they get to 2nd grade, they have to be able to give reasons why they like or dislike something. Try using an opinion writing anchor chart explaining support.

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Now that you’ve taught your students HOW to support their reasons, it’s time to practice. Give them lots of opportunities to try supporting opinions with reasons. There are two activities shown in the image above. First, you have a picture card with an opinion sentence. Students will work with a partner to try to create a strong reason to support this opinion. Next, there is an opinion sentence strip that students will draw and try to create a strong support.

Move onto INTRODUCTIONS when teaching opinion writing

opinion essay topics for elementary students

One of the biggest pieces to teaching opinion writing is the introduction. This is the hook. This is where your students are going to try to draw their audience in. First, teach introductions explicitly using an anchor chart or poster from my ELA units. Then, choose one or two mentor texts to show how they’ve used introductions to hook their readers.

opinion essay topics for elementary students

It’s a great idea to show students what a strong introduction looks like with modeling. Another way is to give them a matching activity where they have to read introduction sentences and sort them.

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Here is another game example for students to participate in. They will match three cards together. First, they will match the topic card and a sample introduction. Then, they will match a strong opinion sentence to follow up their introduction sentence. While playing this game, students can get a strong sense of what an introduction paragraph will look like in a multi-paragraph paper.

Finish up with CONCLUSIONS

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Next, you’ll teach conclusions explicitly. Just like you did with introductions, conclusions need to start with an anchor chart or discussion of a poster. Students can learn conclusion stems, reasons for conclusions, and why they’re used. After teaching opinion writing conclusions explicitly, show students examples with mentor texts from the list above. Read one or two mentor texts and discuss what conclusions were used.

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Give your students lots of practice with writing conclusions. Hands-on writing activities and matching games are two ways to give them practice singling out conclusions. Above, you see a flip book. They will fold and snip along the dotted edges. Under each flap, students will write an example of each type of conclusion (such as final facts, repeated opinions, personal experiences, and offering a suggestion.

Provide lots of opportunities to practice!

opinion essay topics for elementary students

In my ELA units, I also offer 3-4 final writing pieces. They’re presented as lesson plans, so you can still walk students through these steps. First, they’ll be presented with their prompt. The prompt shown above asks which living condition would be worse: Arctic or desert. Then, the steps of the lesson plans walk students through brainstorming, pre-writing, and drafting their papers.

opinion essay topics for elementary students

Finally, you’ve taught all the pieces of your opinion writing unit. Therefore, it’s time to practice, practice, practice. Once you teach students to write an opinion piece from start to finish, give them different prompts to write about in their journals. Or they could even write about these as a final opinion writing piece! Choose high-interest and engaging topics for students to write about.

Are you ready for your Opinion Writing resources?

opinion essay topics for elementary students

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The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers

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The Importance of Opinion Writing

Encouraging our students to express their personal opinions is an important part of the learning process; healthy even. To do this effectively, it is equally important that we help them acquire the necessary skills to express these opinions in a reasoned and coherent manner when teaching opinion writing.

Writing is one of the best possible vehicles for our students not only to express their opinions but to explore the strength and validity of those opinions.

CONSIDERATIONS BEFORE WRITING AN OPINION ESSAY

For our students to competently express their opinions in writing, they must first understand the specific requirements of the type of question they are answering. Of course, there are many types of questions and fun opinion writing prompts that are geared towards coaxing personal opinions from a student and each will require its own specific tailored response.

It’s clear that personal opinions permeate a wide range of genres and media. We find opinions everywhere from hotel reviews and infomercials to political commentary and newspaper editorials. But, despite the diversity of forms opinion writing can take, we can helpfully identify some general criteria that will assist our students in navigating the challenge of most opinion writing prompts and questions.

Let’s take a look at some of these criteria in more detail.

A COMPLETE UNIT FOR TEACHING OPINION WRITING

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OPINION WRITING CRITERIA TO ADDRESS

1. identify the audience: speak clearly.

Writing is about language and language is about communication; students should understand that we do not write in a vacuum. The purpose of an essay, letter, or any other form of writing we care to name, is ultimately to be read.

This means that it is essential that consideration be given to the character of the intended audience. Also, remind students that when they are writing, the reader is not privy to the inner workings of the writer’s mind. They must make their thoughts explicit in their writing and ensure that these thoughts are expressed in a coherent manner.

The student writer should always avoid making the assumption that the reader knows things that are not expressed explicitly in the writing.

2. Take a Stance: Stand Firm

From the very outset, the student should state their position boldly. More than that, they must stand firm in that opinion throughout the entirety of the piece.

Opinion writing is not about communicating a series of pros and cons or discussing at length the various related advantages and disadvantages, the place for that is not here. The opinion piece should open with a bold statement of opinion that is clearly expressed, and that opinion should be held unwaveringly and reinforced constantly throughout the text.

As with many other writing genres , employing a hook to grab the reader’s attention is good practice too. This hook can take the form of a quotation, an anecdote, a statistic, or even a joke. Whatever form the hook takes, it should reveal the writer’s take on things too.

To summarize, whatever the topic and however the student opens their opinion piece, they should ensure they express their opinion immediately and coherently. There should be no doubt in the reader’s mind as to where the student-writer stands on the issue.

3. Choose Appropriate Evidence: Back It Up

There is no doubt that subjectivity is an important aspect of opinion writing in general. That does not mean, however, that opinions do not need to be substantiated.

Your students will need to recognize that each and every statement of opinion will need to be supported by appropriate evidence. This will also help students to develop their critical reading skills as they will be able to better recognize when unsubstantiated claims are made by other writers. Opinions backed up with evidence help lead the reader along the writer’s pathways of thought; making the writing more convincing as a whole.

This evidence can take a wide variety of forms, ranging from personal anecdotes and quotations to statistics and references to scientific studies. Students should also always be encouraged to choose evidence that is broadly suited to the subject they are writing about.

4. Draw Conclusions: Wrap It Up

In the well-organized piece of opinion writing, as with many other types of extended writing, the writing should be structured in paragraphs. Paragraphs are essential elements of good writing organization.

Generally speaking, an opening paragraph gives way to body paragraphs. These body paragraphs, or development paragraphs, describe in more detail the ideas laid out in the initial opening paragraph by further exploring, explaining, and providing supporting evidence for each point.

The final concluding paragraph serves to close the circle by restating the central points in a closing endeavor to drive home the writer’s opinion.

5. A Word on Words

Writing is an art form. Attention to detail is important. But, it isn’t only important to look at the big picture things like structure, students should be encouraged to shift their focus from the text level down to the word and sentence levels too. In an opinion piece, strong, forceful verbs should be the order of the day. There is little space for passive forms when engaged in the construction of convincing arguments.

Things should be kept interesting too. Students should vary their sentence structures grammatically and in length. Variety is key.

 As always in writing, editing should be emphasized. The editing process polishes the well-wrought opinion piece by putting the final gloss on the student’s work.

The OREO Opinion Writing Process Explained

As with all genres, there’s a lot to remember here and acronyms are a helpful way to commit these important things to memory. Luckily, few things can be easier to commit to memory than the name of a delicious cookie:

O – Opinion

R – Reasons

E – Evidence or Examples

O – Opinion (restated)

This memorable acronym will help students remember some of the main elements of opinion writing as outlined above. But, sometimes the hardest thing for students to do is to get the writing ball rolling.

opinion writing | 4 opinion writing28129 | The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

Opinionated Sentence Starters

Sentence starters provide students with great ways to kick-start their writing. Reminding students of simple ways of introducing opinion sentences can be helpful. Here are a few for ‘starters’ for starters:

●     In my opinion…

●     I think that…

●     It seems to me that…

●     It appears to me…

●     I feel that…

opinion writing | 1 0001 sentence structure guide for teachers and students | The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

Once the student-writer has effectively expressed their opinion on a matter, they then will need to provide the reader with the reasons for why they think what they think. In an essay, these reasons will usually be found in the body paragraphs or development paragraphs. Normally, these paragraphs will explore a single reason each.

Some helpful sentence starters for introducing these reasons include:

●     One reason I feel this way is…

●     Evidence to support this can be found in…

●     I believe this to evident in…

Opinion Writing Activities for Students

Students will certainly need practice completing sustained pieces of opinion writing, but some of the most valuable activities to help students evolve their opinion writing abilities barely require a pen to be put to paper.

While the following two activities do not require students to engage in extended pieces of writing, the activities below will assist students in grasping some essential concepts. These activities demonstrate good practice through modelling and also encourage dialogue, discussion, and debate as a means to strengthen opinion writing.

Activity 1: Opinion Writing – What Is It?

This exercise is a good follow-up to introductory work outlining the criteria of opinion writing as described above.

●     Start by passing out copies of a piece of opinion writing you have selected to read with the class. Read the text aloud as the students follow along with their copy. The opinion text chosen can come from a wide range of genres, including advertisements, letters, editorials, essays, articles, or reviews.

●     Assign students a talking partner and instruct students to take five minutes to identify the various criteria employed in the text. Encourage students to mark and annotate their copies of the text accordingly. You may even wish to supply students with a checklist compiled from the criteria mentioned previously in this article.

●     As a whole class, discuss how successfully the text fulfills the criteria. What did the writer do well? What could they have done better? You can record their responses on the whiteboard.

The aim of this exercise is for students to hone their critical faculties while internalizing the criteria. This will reap rewards when the students later engage in their own extended opinion writing.

Activity 2: The Collaborative Case

This activity employs collaboration to help students build a stronger case for their opinion on a divisive issue.

●     First, define the parameters of the exercise by presenting an either/or conundrum to the class. This doesn’t have to be overly controversial in nature, just stated in such a way that it forces the students to take one side or another. This could be stated simply as a choice, e.g. Dogs or cats? City or countryside? Beach or Mountains? Sweet or savory?

●     Students then divide into two groups according to their stated preferences. In their groups, they then discuss and compile as many supporting reasons for their choice as they can come up with. As a group, they will discuss the relative merits of each reason, before agreeing on their top five.

●     The groups then share their reasons in a debate format, using arguments and counter-arguments, leading into an open, free-ranging discussion.

The value of this exercise lies in the collaborative and ‘combative’ natures of the exercises. Just as our physical muscles can grow through resistance, so too can the strength and resilience of our opinions and arguments.

This activity can also be used as a lead-in to opinion writing as it works well as a prewriting preparation exercise. The complexity of the issue to be discussed and debated can easily be modified to suit the abilities of the students too.

A COMPLETE UNIT ON TEACHING FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

opinion writing | figurative language Unit 1 | The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE  is like  “SPECIAL EFFECTS FOR AUTHORS.”  It is a powerful tool to create  VIVID IMAGERY  through words. This  HUGE UNIT  guides you through completely understanding  FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE .

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OPINION WRITING VIDEO TUTORIALS

These videos from teaching without frills are an excellent starting point for opinion writing. You can view the entire collection here.

  The Wrap Up

Opinion writing is a higher-level skill that makes many demands on our students. It will challenge them to move beyond parroting the facts and figures they have acquired in their learning to formulate their own thoughts on topics they have learned about in class, or in the wider world beyond the school gates.

It will make demands on their skill as writers too. Our students must learn to mold and mechanically manipulate the language on the page to express their beliefs persuasively and effectively. To do this successfully, they will need ample opportunities to practice their writing craft. Once a firm understanding of the structures involved has been established, the student can become more fluid in their expression. They will add art and flair to their craft. But first, they must build on these firm foundations.

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Home — Blog — Topic Ideas — Great Opinion Essay Topics for Everyone

Great Opinion Essay Topics for Everyone

opinion essay topics

An opinion essay is about expressing your point of view. You can fully agree with a certain statement, partially or express complete disagreement. In this case, each argument in support of your point of view should be devoted to a paragraph. In this type of essay, you indicate your opinion in the introduction and conclusion.

Choosing a balanced approach, you should not only describe the problem from two sides (one paragraph – points for, and the second – points against) but also indicate which position is closer to you. In this case, it is advisable to start with an idea that is less close to you and devote the second paragraph to the one you adhere to. You must indicate your position in three places: in the introduction, in the conclusion, and in the topic sentence of the second paragraph.

In the introduction, the author expresses his opinion, starting with the words in my opinion. In the first paragraph, he indicates the position that is less close to him, and in the second, the one to which he is more inclined. At the same time, he gives consistent and convincing arguments in support of his opinion with the help of introductory constructions on the one hand, on the other hand. In the conclusion, the author uses the introductory phrase in conclusion and summarizes his opinion with the phrase I am still convinced that.

Next, we will look at opinion essay topics that will help you get inspired to write your own work.

Top 15 Opinion Essay Topics

Here we will analyze the 15 most popular topics for an opinion essay .

  • Do you think that technology has reduced the social interaction of people?
  • How has science influenced modern education?
  • How do you feel about dating apps?
  • Do you think social media filters are bad for mental health?
  • Do you think smartphones can be used in the classroom?
  • How do you think social media should be censored?
  • How do you think the Internet harms or benefits?
  • Is global warming real and how can it be combated?
  • Is it true that strict parents harm children more than they help?
  • Do you think parents should provide privacy to their children?
  • Is it true that it is easier for a younger person to learn a language?
  • Do you think medical marijuana should be banned?
  • Is it true that all legends are based on false facts?
  • Is it normal for college students to be tech-savvy?
  • Is it true that dolphins carry death to the dam?

Public Opinion Essay Topics

Public opinion papers topics include the general beliefs, desires, and reasoning of most people.

  • Can we continue to trust news resources and channels?
  • Do you think health insurance should be more affordable?
  • Is it true that domestic violence harms the public?
  • Do you think that abortion can remain legal ?
  • Do you think the legalization of cannabis is more harmful or beneficial?
  • Does owning a firearm make people feel safer?
  • Do you think national parks are endangered?
  • How do you think social networks affect the split of the public in the country?
  • Can mass depression be considered a global health problem in the country?
  • Should school help parents control the amount of time their children spend on gadgets?
  • How can you fight fake news?
  • What solutions to economic inequality would you suggest?
  • Can we trust the voting system?
  • Does our country need to reform its military policy?
  • Do you think that the death penalty should be abolished everywhere?
  • Do you think it is possible to fight corruption in the police?
  • How can the rise of homelessness be tackled in the country?
  • Do you think the public will ever be satisfied with their president?
  • How does the appearance of a person affect his mood and performance?
  • Is it necessary to play sports in schools on a mandatory basis?

Personal Opinion Essay Topics

Here are some ideas for opinion essays on personal topics.

  • Is it true that social networks contribute to the development of depression in adolescents?
  • Do you think that respect is a key aspect of success in a person’s life?
  • How do you think close friendships should imply ethics?
  • Can self-pity harm a person?
  • How do you know when a romantic relationship is over?
  • In your opinion, should the public education system provide healthy nutrition to students?
  • Is it acceptable that students’ homework takes up all their free time?
  • How important is rest to ensure good academic performance?
  • Does travel really help broaden your horizons and worldview?
  • Is it true that journaling has a positive effect on a person’s emotions?
  • How do you think students should be allowed to use e-books during class?
  • Can I feel safe at school ?
  • Is bullying really a sign of a person’s insecurity?
  • Does a modern business need offices?
  • Should the age limit for drivers be raised to 18?
  • Do you think working women can be good mothers?
  • Does military training really have a positive effect on the development of a person’s character?
  • How can evil parents harm their children?
  • Does a person need time management?
  • What benefits and harms can energy drinks bring to the human body?

Opinion Topics in History

Here are some historical topics for opinion writing .

  • Benefits of learning the history of other countries.
  • US role in World War II.
  • Religion and State: An Unobvious Connection.
  • Why do students need to study subjects that they will not need in the future?
  • History of cinema: how did it all begin?
  • Echoes of Slavery Today: The Black Lives Matter Movement.
  • Views and true intentions of Che Guevara.
  • Benefits of capitalism.
  • Causes of the Caribbean Crisis.
  • Causes of the Cold War.
  • The difference between the monarchy in Spain and Great Britain.
  • Religion and the Amish: A Conservative Religious Movement in Christianity.
  • Displacement by the British colonizers of the indigenous population of the United States.
  • The viability of communism today. 

Good Opinion Writing Topics: Elementary

Here are good opinion writing topics for an essay on elementary themes.

  • Time management in elementary grades.
  • The role of extracurricular reading in education.
  • The role of social networks in shaping the personality of a child.
  • Creative subjects as the basis for the versatile development of the student.
  • The role of pocket money in the development of interpersonal relationships between primary school students.
  • No use of smartphones during lessons.
  • The influence of pets on the socialization of students.
  • Food and education: they are more connected than you think.
  • Change as an important part of your child’s socialization.
  • Drawing and singing: two things you can’t refuse.
  • The role of classical music in stimulating the brain activity of students.
  • Warming up between classes is a way to improve the learning process.
  • Gamification of classes: pros and cons.
  • Is it worth it to completely replace physical media with digital ones?
  • What is the complexity and size of the ideal homework assignment?

Opinion Essay Topics: Sports

Here are some sports topics for essay writing .

  • How do you think the use of doping in sports is ethical?
  • Does success in sports really depends on eating a healthy diet?
  • Do athletes have a life after retirement?
  • Is it possible to justify sporting achievements by getting serious injuries?
  • Is it true that athletes must meet high moral standards?
  • Is it true that successful coaches make their teams successful?
  • How much do professional athletes get paid?
  • Is it true that female athletes are engaged in traditionally male sports?
  • The role of the Olympic Games in strengthening friendly relations between countries.
  • Is there any ethics in sports exports involving animals?
  • Can a break from sports be beneficial?
  • Do good shoes really provide a part of success in sports?
  • Do college athletes deserve professional coaching?
  • Is it true that athletes are less susceptible to depression?
  • Is it true that basketball players are more vulnerable to racist discrimination?

Opinion Essay Topics on Culture

Here are some cultural opinion topics .

  • The role of modern pop music in shaping public attitudes.
  • Unrealistic beauty standards of today.
  • Electronic music as a tribute to universal digitalization.
  • Advantages and disadvantages of online communication.
  • The Internet as a Cause of Inappropriate Expectations in Interpersonal Relationships.
  • Globalization of the fashion industry as a reason for the destruction of cultural heritage.
  • The cycle of fashion.
  • K-pop as a unique phenomenon in modern culture.
  • Rock and pop industry: they have more in common than you think.
  • YouTube as the main platform for identifying talents.
  • Copyright in the music industry.
  • Twitch and Instagram as tools for female objectification.
  • Digital technologies in politics.
  • Features of the cuisines of the people of the world.
  • Pacifism in modern culture.

Nursing Opinion Essay Topics

Here are some best opinion nursing essay topics 

  • Cases of exaggeration of the powers of nurses.
  • Features of communication of medical staff with relatives of patients.
  • The problem of interaction between medical staff and patients planning a gender transition.
  • Digitalization of work processes of medical staff.
  • Digitalization as one of the reasons for the reduction of medical staff.
  • Forced vaccination: pros and cons.
  • Globalization of medical control of the population.
  • The role of homeopathy in modern medicine.
  • The problem of alternative medicine.
  • The problem of euthanasia in different countries.
  • Patient Data Privacy.
  • Expansion of the ban on the free sale of drugs.
  • Genetics and diseases.
  • The effectiveness of patient participation in the treatment process.
  • Gender dependence of the nursing profession.

Social Media Opinion Essay Topics

Here are some social media essays writing ideas.

  • Social networks as an element of approval in education.
  • The impact of social media on everyday life.
  • Censorship on the modern web.
  • Problems with using digital sources of information in education.
  • Eco activity in social networks.
  • The role of influencers in changing the moral values of society.
  • Social engineering as a scourge of modern society.
  • Cyberbullying and reality.
  • Children and social networks: are restrictions necessary?
  • Digitalization and modern culture.
  • The role of Twitter in politics.
  • Smartphones and parental controls.
  • Piracy on social media.
  • Popularization of deep fakes.
  • Success in reality and success in social networks: is there a difference?

Education Opinion Essay Topics

Here are the best interesting education essay themes.

  • Should children be taught to write in elementary schools?
  • Should students be allowed to carry phones to school?
  • What benefits do students get from participating in extracurricular activities?
  • Do you think it is worth raising the age of graduates?
  • Do you think e-learning is effective enough?
  • The role of gamification in increasing the involvement of students in the educational process.
  • Why is learning a foreign language critical for a student?
  • Why grade is not an indicator of a student’s mental development?
  • Are e-books dangerous?
  • Is it acceptable to punish students by teachers?
  • How reliable can online sources be for research?
  • Should students study only those subjects they like?
  • And how relevant are Gender Schools today?
  • Are there any advantages to distance learning?
  • What is the role of Latin in modern education?

 Literature Opinion Essay Topics

Here are some literature opinion essay topics.

  • What caused gender bias in 17th-century English literature?
  • What is the satire in Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?
  • How did Shakespeare present love and death in his works?
  • Do you think English grammar should be preserved?
  • The more a person reads, the better he can write.
  • How do you think reducing the amount of literature in college will positively affect the level of education of students?
  • Do engineering students need English?
  • How can essay writing help in building a successful career?
  • Taras Shevchenko as an image of Ukrainian society.
  • Is Martin Luther King Jr. the voice of the African American people?
  • How can science fiction contribute to the development of technology?
  • Does reading have a positive effect on PTSD patients?
  • How quickly will e-books be replaced by paper ones?
  • Should the works of the classics become free?
  • How to get kids to read? 

Psychology Opinion Essay Topics

Here are the best topics for an essay on psychology. 

  • What is causing the rise of racism in the United States of America?
  • What is the importance of personal perception?
  • Is love really a chemical reaction
  • Identify examples of the effective use of propaganda.
  • How important is it for people to understand non-verbal communication?
  • What are the most pressing issues in the field of social cognition?
  • How to force yourself not to put off homework until later?
  • How do commercials affect the human brain?
  • Is it true that laughter is good for a person?
  • What are the consequences of cyberbullying?
  • What non-standard methods can increase productivity in the workplace?
  • How does aging affect human behavior?
  • Are there effective treatments for a personality disorder?
  • Does exercise really have a positive effect on the human brain?
  • Is it the right decision to give a small child access to a smartphone?

Opinion Essay Sample for Students

Here are interesting ideas for opinion essays for students.

  • The problem of the high cost of education in capitalist countries.
  • Issues of the safety of public places.
  • The attitude of different generations to social networks.
  • The value of the institution of marriage in modern society.
  • Maternity leave and the problems of restoring former labor duties.
  • Antidepressants as an addiction.
  • The out-of-school pastime of students.
  • Gender and economic inequality in third world countries.
  • Interpersonal relationships and the covid-19 pandemic.
  • IVF privacy issues.
  • Changes in US government policy related to Russian aggression.
  • The environmental aspect of using private transport.
  • DNA examination in the investigation: how expedient is it to rely on its results?
  • The problem of life imprisonment in states that have abolished the death penalty.
  • The influence of the opinion of the people of the United States on the foreign policy of the state.
  • The effectiveness of the state in solving drug addiction problems.

We hope that the topics that we have suggested will help you write a good topic for an essay . In case you need help with writing a paper, you can always refer to our free database, which contains thousands of essays and topics for writing them. On our website, you will find many prompts and topics you can write about   in good opinion essays.

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opinion essay topics for elementary students

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15 Excellent Opinion Essay Topics For Elementary Students

An opinion essay is a kind of academic writing in which students express their opinion concerning a certain problem. Opinion essays can speak about any possible sphere of human life, so, if you need an interesting topic for such an essay, you can try to cope even with some brainstorming.

The Internet is packed with websites that offer lists of interesting and catchy opinion essay topics. If you want, you can use some of them. As well, you can use the ones that are listed below.

  • Should all the wars in the world stop at one moment and never break out again?
  • Should the school week be shorter, up to three days of studying per week or so?
  • Should big film companies in Hollywood produce more cartoons and fewer movies for adults?
  • What do you think about the statement that says that television is really harmful for children?
  • If you could change something important in your home city, house, your own room, what would it be?
  • What do you think: is it better to live in a big city or in a small town?
  • Do you agree with the statement that those who work hard, receive plenty as a result?
  • Imagine that you are traveling and happen to be in a city where all the historic landmarks are collected in museums. Would you like to visit one or several of them? Which one would you choose.
  • Some people give preference to fast food, so-called junk food. Others simply cannot stand it, so they cook all their meals at home. Where do you prefer having a tasteful meal?
  • Do you agree with a statement that says that sometimes it’s better to replace some truth with lies? Is it true that lies can sometimes save people’s lives?
  • Do you ever use public transport? What, in your opinion, should be changed in all those buses, taxi, etc.?
  • It has been said several years ago, that people live much longer now. How do you think, what makes scientists make such claims?
  • Imagine that a person you know well plant to move to your city. Which attractions would you recommend to such a guest? What can you tell about the city?
  • Do you agree that it is necessary to cope with all tasks you have, regardless of the fact that you do not like those tasks at all?
  • If you had a lot of money, what would you buy?

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What I’ve Learned From My Students’ College Essays

The genre is often maligned for being formulaic and melodramatic, but it’s more important than you think.

An illustration of a high school student with blue hair, dreaming of what to write in their college essay.

By Nell Freudenberger

Most high school seniors approach the college essay with dread. Either their upbringing hasn’t supplied them with several hundred words of adversity, or worse, they’re afraid that packaging the genuine trauma they’ve experienced is the only way to secure their future. The college counselor at the Brooklyn high school where I’m a writing tutor advises against trauma porn. “Keep it brief , ” she says, “and show how you rose above it.”

I started volunteering in New York City schools in my 20s, before I had kids of my own. At the time, I liked hanging out with teenagers, whom I sometimes had more interesting conversations with than I did my peers. Often I worked with students who spoke English as a second language or who used slang in their writing, and at first I was hung up on grammar. Should I correct any deviation from “standard English” to appeal to some Wizard of Oz behind the curtains of a college admissions office? Or should I encourage students to write the way they speak, in pursuit of an authentic voice, that most elusive of literary qualities?

In fact, I was missing the point. One of many lessons the students have taught me is to let the story dictate the voice of the essay. A few years ago, I worked with a boy who claimed to have nothing to write about. His life had been ordinary, he said; nothing had happened to him. I asked if he wanted to try writing about a family member, his favorite school subject, a summer job? He glanced at his phone, his posture and expression suggesting that he’d rather be anywhere but in front of a computer with me. “Hobbies?” I suggested, without much hope. He gave me a shy glance. “I like to box,” he said.

I’ve had this experience with reluctant writers again and again — when a topic clicks with a student, an essay can unfurl spontaneously. Of course the primary goal of a college essay is to help its author get an education that leads to a career. Changes in testing policies and financial aid have made applying to college more confusing than ever, but essays have remained basically the same. I would argue that they’re much more than an onerous task or rote exercise, and that unlike standardized tests they are infinitely variable and sometimes beautiful. College essays also provide an opportunity to learn precision, clarity and the process of working toward the truth through multiple revisions.

When a topic clicks with a student, an essay can unfurl spontaneously.

Even if writing doesn’t end up being fundamental to their future professions, students learn to choose language carefully and to be suspicious of the first words that come to mind. Especially now, as college students shoulder so much of the country’s ethical responsibility for war with their protest movement, essay writing teaches prospective students an increasingly urgent lesson: that choosing their own words over ready-made phrases is the only reliable way to ensure they’re thinking for themselves.

Teenagers are ideal writers for several reasons. They’re usually free of preconceptions about writing, and they tend not to use self-consciously ‘‘literary’’ language. They’re allergic to hypocrisy and are generally unfiltered: They overshare, ask personal questions and call you out for microaggressions as well as less egregious (but still mortifying) verbal errors, such as referring to weed as ‘‘pot.’’ Most important, they have yet to put down their best stories in a finished form.

I can imagine an essay taking a risk and distinguishing itself formally — a poem or a one-act play — but most kids use a more straightforward model: a hook followed by a narrative built around “small moments” that lead to a concluding lesson or aspiration for the future. I never get tired of working with students on these essays because each one is different, and the short, rigid form sometimes makes an emotional story even more powerful. Before I read Javier Zamora’s wrenching “Solito,” I worked with a student who had been transported by a coyote into the U.S. and was reunited with his mother in the parking lot of a big-box store. I don’t remember whether this essay focused on specific skills or coping mechanisms that he gained from his ordeal. I remember only the bliss of the parent-and-child reunion in that uninspiring setting. If I were making a case to an admissions officer, I would suggest that simply being able to convey that experience demonstrates the kind of resilience that any college should admire.

The essays that have stayed with me over the years don’t follow a pattern. There are some narratives on very predictable topics — living up to the expectations of immigrant parents, or suffering from depression in 2020 — that are moving because of the attention with which the student describes the experience. One girl determined to become an engineer while watching her father build furniture from scraps after work; a boy, grieving for his mother during lockdown, began taking pictures of the sky.

If, as Lorrie Moore said, “a short story is a love affair; a novel is a marriage,” what is a college essay? Every once in a while I sit down next to a student and start reading, and I have to suppress my excitement, because there on the Google Doc in front of me is a real writer’s voice. One of the first students I ever worked with wrote about falling in love with another girl in dance class, the absolute magic of watching her move and the terror in the conflict between her feelings and the instruction of her religious middle school. She made me think that college essays are less like love than limerence: one-sided, obsessive, idiosyncratic but profound, the first draft of the most personal story their writers will ever tell.

Nell Freudenberger’s novel “The Limits” was published by Knopf last month. She volunteers through the PEN America Writers in the Schools program.

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  1. 141 Topics For Writing That Are Deep And Thoughtful

    opinion essay topics for elementary students

  2. Opinion Writing Topics For 4th Grade

    opinion essay topics for elementary students

  3. 100 Persuasive Essay Topics

    opinion essay topics for elementary students

  4. Persuasive Writing Ideas for Elementary School Students

    opinion essay topics for elementary students

  5. Opinion Writing Prompts

    opinion essay topics for elementary students

  6. 60 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

    opinion essay topics for elementary students

VIDEO

  1. Important Essay Topics

  2. Opinion Essay/IELTS Writing Task 2/ IELTS Academic/ Essay Structure/ Essay Templates

  3. Elementary Mathematics-II by z.r bhatti chapter 5(Integration) Exercise 5.1 Iong Questions

  4. Writing Reasons for an Opinion Essay for Kids

  5. Elementary Mathematics-II by z.r bhatti chapter 4 Question 1 solution

  6. Part 1 Quantitative Research Titles for Elementary Education

COMMENTS

  1. 100 Opinion Writing Prompts for Elementary Students

    Diversify Topics: Rotate between different types of prompts. This variety keeps students engaged and helps develop a range of skills. Consider Current Events and Relevance: Incorporate prompts related to recent events or topics for opinion writing relevant to students' lives. This makes the writing exercise more engaging and relatable.

  2. 46 Excellent Essay Topics for Elementary Students

    Use these essay prompts for elementary students to help kids get better at personal essay writing, learn to use those budding language skills, and express their ideas more effectively! ... 30 Great 5th Grade Opinion Writing Prompts; Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7-8 Grade 9-12 All Ages. Tags Elementary, elementary ...

  3. 49 Opinion Writing Prompts for Students

    49 Opinion Writing Prompts for Students. One of the most common essay types is the opinion, or persuasive, essay. In an opinion essay, the writer states a point of view, then provides facts and reasoned arguments to support that viewpoint. The goal of the essay is to convince the reader to share the writer's opinion.

  4. 100 Best Opinion Writing Prompts for Elementary Students

    Not only opinion topics are great for finding out what your child or student likes when it comes to a certain topic but also get them to think outside of the box and get creative when writing. Writing prompts logical, critical, and exploratory thinking. These opinion writing prompts are also great for middle schoolers, high schoolers, and ...

  5. 50+ Super Persuasive Writing Topics for Kids

    15 Persuasive Writing Topics for Kids. We should not have a school dress code. Pets should be allowed in school. School break times should be longer. There should be no homework. The school day should be shorter. Children should be able to use cellphones in school. I should get a pocket money raise from my parents.

  6. 20 Prompts for Opinion Writing That Motivate Kids

    O - In my opinion, students should not have homework. R - They work so hard all day at school and need a break. E - Instead of focusing on more work kids should be able to go outside and play, do a sport, or do other fun activities. O - In conclusion, students work all day at school and should not have to do homework.

  7. 72 Fun Opinion Writing Prompts that Students Will WANT to Write About

    These elementary opinion writing prompts will have your students wanting to write so they can tell you exactly what they think about topics that are relevant and interesting to them! Opinion writing is the perfect way to introduce the more formal persuasive writing genre. It allows students to practise developing and justifying their own ideas ...

  8. 101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

    101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens. Use your words to sway the reader. Persuasive writing is one of those skills that can help students succeed in real life. Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative, but they rely less on facts and more on emotion to sway the reader.

  9. Over 170 Prompts to Inspire Writing and Discussion

    During the 2020-21 school year, we asked 176 questions, and you can find them all below or here as a PDF. The questions are divided into two categories — those that provide opportunities for ...

  10. 51 Superb Opinion Writing Prompts for 4th Grade Students

    5. What's the most important school supply in your desk and why? 6. Your teacher is asking your opinion regarding a few new class rewards. Mention at least two of your favorites, and explain why she should select one of your choices. 7. In your opinion, at what age should kids have a cell phone? 8.

  11. 100 Compelling Argumentative Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

    100 Thought-Provoking Argumentative Writing Prompts for Kids and Teens. Practice making well-reasoned arguments using research and facts. Writing a strong argumentative essay teaches students to make a case for their own point of view without relying on emotion or passion. These argumentative essay topics provide options for kids of all ages ...

  12. 36 Opinion Writing Prompts for Students » JournalBuddies.com

    Opinion essays, or persuasive writing, require that writers — of any age — present opinions on a specific topic. They usually begin with a strong opinion statement and then use supporting examples and evidence to support the argument. This type of writing requires critical thinking, helps to develop writing skills, and, best of all, boosts ...

  13. 33 Best Opinion-Writing Mentor Texts for the Classroom

    11. The Perfect Pet by Margie Palatini. Elizabeth crafts a plan to convince her parents to let her have a pet, with unexpected—but pleasing—results. This is our favorite opinion-writing mentor text for introducing kids to win-win solutions and encouraging them to suggest them in their own opinion writing.

  14. 130 New Prompts for Argumentative Writing

    Try our student writing prompts. In 2017, we compiled a list of 401 argumentative writing prompts, all drawn from our daily Student Opinion column. Now, we're rounding up 130 more we've ...

  15. 2022-23 Student Opinion Writing Prompts

    2022-23 Student Opinion Writing Prompts. July 14, 2023. Share full article.

  16. 20 Argumentative Essay Topics for Students

    Most states require students make the switch from opinion writing to argument writing in 5th or 6th grade.-Opinion writing builds the foundational skill set for argument writing. Opinion writing requires students to take a stand and support their choice with clear and relevant reasons. The purpose of opinion writing is to share a point of view.

  17. Teaching Opinion Writing Tips and Activities

    First, teach WHAT Opinion Writing is. When you begin your opinion writing unit, you of course need to start with teaching them what it is. You will be showing them the framework of an opinion writing piece. First, create an anchor chart (or use one provided to you in my ELA units). Then, as you explore texts, examples, and activities, you can ...

  18. 65 Opinion Essay Topics for Elementary Kids

    Opinion essay topics for elementary students help kids learn to have and defend their opinions. Below are 65 of such topics. All elementary school dress codes should be scrapped. Children should be allowed to bring their pets to school. Homework should be given to students two times a week. School hours should be shorter and more fun.

  19. Opinion Writing Guide for Students and Teachers

    OPINION WRITING CRITERIA TO ADDRESS. 1. Identify the Audience: Speak Clearly. Writing is about language and language is about communication; students should understand that we do not write in a vacuum. The purpose of an essay, letter, or any other form of writing we care to name, is ultimately to be read.

  20. Great Opinion Essay Topics for Everyone

    Here are good opinion writing topics for an essay on elementary themes. Time management in elementary grades. The role of extracurricular reading in education. The role of social networks in shaping the personality of a child. Creative subjects as the basis for the versatile development of the student.

  21. 15 Excellent Opinion Essay Topics For Elementary Students

    15 Excellent Opinion Essay Topics For Elementary Students . An opinion essay is a kind of academic writing in which students express their opinion concerning a certain problem. Opinion essays can speak about any possible sphere of human life, so, if you need an interesting topic for such an essay, you can try to cope even with some ...

  22. What I've Learned From My Students' College Essays

    Most high school seniors approach the college essay with dread. Either their upbringing hasn't supplied them with several hundred words of adversity, or worse, they're afraid that packaging ...