• Schools and Districts
  • Free Webinars
  • Love To Write and Read All Day
  • Empowering Writers

Hub Free Trial

  • Scope & Sequence Guides
  • Standards Alignment Charts
  • Graphic Organizers
  • Literature Connection
  • Student Writing Samples
  • Lessons of the Month
  • Quick Writes
  • Recommended Reading

Opinion Writing- Grade 5 - Autumn

Autumn the Best Time of the Year Image

Informational/Opinion Writing Grade 5 Sample Autumn

Feedback for Improvement

Topic: Autumn - my favorite season Main Reason#1: changes in nature Main Reason #2: animals prepare  Main Reason #3: weather changes

What worked:

  • Organization:   This piece includes an introduction, three main reasons and a conclusion. The student clearly understands the organization and author’s purpose of informational/opinion writing.
  • Main Ideas: There are three main reasons, however, the nature of the main reasons is overlapping. See the prescriptive lessons below for additional commentary.
  • Elaboration: There is some evidence of the detail generating questions. In paragraph two the author writes, “The leaves change slowly to red, orange, and yellow. This gives people the chance to gaze at this beautiful scenery for a little over two months.” There are additional sentences that are descriptive in nature, however they are extraneous from the main reason. In some instances, the descriptive detail does not go on to include “Why is it important?” so it reads like a description for the sake of description.
  • Sentence Variety/Word Choice: The student uses interesting sentences. For example, “Therefore autumn offers us a large assortment of positive changes.” Another example, “Thus animals once again are ready for survival!”

Feedback with Prescriptive Lesson:

CHOOSE a Focus Skill: What skill will make the biggest impact for this writer?

Broad Yet Distinct Main Ideas/Reasons:  This piece of writing displayed some overlapping of main reasons. This student would benefit from a deep dive into this skill. When looking at the details that support each main reason, the reader can easily see that there are details that could fit into any one of these main reasons. For example, in the first main reason paragraph the author writes, “Many birds except for crows fly south where it’s a bit warmer in early October.” This detail could easily fit into the paragraph all about how animals prepare. Another example of the overlapping nature of the main reasons is in main reason three where the student writes, “The days get darker and darker as the earth rotates further and further away from the sun.” This detail is really about changes in nature. Because of this overlapping nature, the reader is left to wonder what this piece is really all about. 

All lessons in this section need to be taught with an emphasis on Lesson 3 Pick, List, and Choose. The importance of choosing broad yet distinct main ideas/reasons affects every other part of the writing. Once you’ve established a number of main ideas/reasons through the pick, list, choose process, then it’s imperative that you look at those that could potentially overlap and make sure students choose main ideas/reasons that are distinct from one another. 

  • Section 2 Lesson 3: Pick, List, and Choose
  • Section 2 Lesson 5: Main Ideas - Don't Overlap Them!
  • Section 2 Lesson 6: Main Ideas/Reasons - Broad or Too Narrow?

This student obviously understands the structure of informational/opinion writing but needs direct instruction in choosing main ideas/reasons that are distinct. The fact that there is some powerful word choice, interesting description, and sentence variety is overshadowed by the overlapping nature of the main ideas/reasons.

Recommended Resources

  • Empowering Writer's Methodology
  • Informational & Opinion Writing Guide for Grade 5

Download

731 Main Street Suite 117 Monroe, CT 06468

Administrators.

  • Administrators Home
  • Research & Case Studies
  • Teachers Home
  • The Teachers Toolbox
  • Our Products
  • Our Workshops
  • Career Opportunities
  • Tax-Exempt certificate
  • Cookie Policy
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms & Conditions

Join Our Newsletter

Teaching Made Practical

  • Character Traits
  • Compare and Contrast
  • Read Alouds
  • Point of View
  • Reading Response Ideas
  • Summarizing
  • Text Features
  • Text Structures
  • Find the Fib
  • Reusable Ideas
  • Disclosure Policy
  • Lifetime Access
  • Research Project
  • Free Activity
  • BHM Biographies
  • 8 Activity Ideas

Scaffolding opinion writing essays using sentence starters, paragraph frames, and templates in upper elementary

Scaffolding an Opinion Writing Essay With Frames and Templates

Scaffolding opinion writing essays using sentence starters, paragraph frames, and templates in upper elementary

Teaching opinion writing to your 3rd, 4th, or 5th grade students soon?  Use the sentence starters and paragraph frames below in your lessons to help students structure their writing, use transitional words, stay on topic, and support their opinions.

Templates like the examples below are a great way to introduce opinion writing.  The hope is that eventually, students will go on to write without a provided outline and add a little of their own personality to their writing, but starting off with a clear structure helps students learn to become better writers.

Start Small - With Opinion Writing Sentence Starters or Frames

3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students love giving their opinions, so help them structure their opinions with sentence starters and frames. This is a great way to introduce opinion writing and doesn't frustrate students.

Providing structure is especially beneficial for your ELL and low language students, but ALL students can improve their writing with this scaffolding.

Some example sentence starters are below.  Depending on the topic being discussed and the opinion being shared, not all sentence frames will work in all situations.  Adapt them for your particular scenario!

Example Sentence Starters

  • In my opinion, _____ is better than _____ because _____.
  • The best thing about _____ is _____.
  • I am strongly against _____ because _____.
  • Although some people believe _____, I believe _____.
  • Ever since _____, I have believed _____.

Using a Paragraph Template or Frame

Example paragraph frames.

In my opinion, __________ is better than __________ because __________.  For example, _______________.  Furthermore, _______________.  Clearly, _______________ is the worse option.

I prefer __________ because __________.  For instance, _______________.  Also, _______________.  Finally, _______________.

Opinion Writing Essay Template / Structure / Outline

Going from writing paragraphs to writing an entire essay can be overwhelming for upper elementary students - and middle school students as well!

Modeling how to write an opinion essay is an essential first step.  (My Scaffolded Opinion Writing Resource includes a teacher model to make this easy for you.)

After modeling an opinion essay, provide students with an opinion writing template/outline to help them structure their own writing.  This will help students stay on topic, use transitional words, and provide support for their opinions.  And, most importantly, it will keep students from feeling overwhelmed and frustrated.

Scaffolded Opinion Writing Essay Template for 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students

If you know your students would benefit from this type of scaffolding but don’t have the time to create it yourself, check out my Scaffolded Opinion Writing Resource.

It walks students through the writing process with support each step of the way. This resource also provides a model essay so that you can model expectations for your students. Plus, it can be used over and over again with different topics.

If you found these opinion writing tips to be useful, then you will probably like these tips for teaching students how to write a compare and contrast essay. 

Want a Compare and Contrast Freebie?

Free reading comprehension practice for third, fourth, and fifth graders - paired passages about Thomas Edison and Benjamin Franklin

Download these reading passages with a compare and contrast activity for free and use it to today!

Sign up to get access to exclusive teaching resources, activities and, ideas!

teach2tell

How to teach Opinion Writing to 3rd, 4th and 5th Graders

Opinion writing, also known as Persuasive writing, is by far an easy enough genre to teach 3 rd , 4 th, and 5th graders. Unlike narrative writing where creativity and flair come into play, the elements of opinion writing are more structured, almost formulaic, and thus easier to assimilate.

How to teach opinion writing to 3rd, 4th, 5th grades

Teaching The Structural Components of Opinion Writing

Students are known to turn out better writing pieces if they have direction. Hence explicitly teaching the structural components of a persuasive/opinion essay is essential.

If students are taught the form and structure of opinion writing, the job is half done. The success of the other half pretty much depends upon the writer’s content knowledge of the subject.

Teaching the structure of an opinion essay can thus be broken down into three major sections: The Introduction, The Body, and The Conclusion.

How to teach kids opinion writing

✏ The Introduction of Opinion Writing

How many times have we reminded our students that the beginning of an essay is so very important – that it has to arrest the reader’s attention so they are hooked to continue reading.

For the introduction to be effective, it must have a hook , the writer’s opinion, and a thesis statement . This is the structure of the introduction.

If students just practice writing an introduction on several given writing prompts for a week, adhering to structure for this section, will be second nature.

The Hook In the Introduction

Teaching students just one way to hook the reader in an opinion essay is not enough as different types of hooks would create different effects – besides we need to give our little writers lots of choices when it comes to writing. This flexibility goes a long way in getting their creative juices going when writing supporting details that support their opinion.

5 Popular Hooks to Support the Opinion

So you can teach your 3 rd , 4 th, and 5 th graders to begin their opinion essay with any one of the five different hooks. Interestingly, they are also called sizzling starts. And rightly so.

Students may begin with any one of the below hooks:

  • Strong Statement
  • Rhetorical Question

The first two starters are popular starters and I often encourage my 5 th graders to use either of them in their introduction.

How to teach persuasive writing to 3rd, 4th, 5th grades

Writing the Opinion of an Opinion Essay

Right after the hook, students write their opinion on the issue after weighing the pros and cons.

Now for the lower grades (grades 1-3), students could simply begin their opinion with any of the phrases:

  • ‘In my opinion..’
  • ‘I firmly believe…’
  • ‘I am of the opinion…’

However, 3 rd , 4 th, and 5 th graders need to show more sophistication in their writing, so beginning with these opinion starters would not do justice to the writing skill they are actually capable of implementing.

Instead, students need to convey their opinion subtly by reflecting on the issue. This will consequently lead to the thesis statement that follows next and sums up the introduction.

Do you need to teach your 3rd, 4th or 5th grade students how to write an opinon or a persuasive essay? This resource will help scaffold the techniques and the structural elements.

✏ Writing The Body of an Opinion Essay

We can teach our 3 rd , 4 th, and 5 th graders to adhere to structure when they write the body paragraphs of their opinion essay too.

Each body paragraph needs to have a reason introduced by a topic sentence , supporting details that support the reason, and a concluding sentence that sums up that body paragraph. If students are explicitly taught this structure, then they are more likely to stay on task and won’t get carried away in their writing.

So, how many body paragraphs should there be?

The best number, I tell my 5th-grade students is – three. Each reason is given its very own paragraph, with the last paragraph reserved for the most important reason.

The least strong reason should be sandwiched between the first strong reason and the last. This is in keeping with the notion that the beginning and end of any piece of writing are the most important.

How to teach opinion writing to 3rd, 4th, 5th grades

✏ Writing The Conclusion of an Opinion Essay

Some students are known to get so carried away with their reasoning in the body paragraphs that they often skip this last important section or don’t have the time to write it – if sitting a timed writing examination.

It is in this section, that students need to be reminded to re-visit their opinion, provide a summary statement of their reasons, and the most important of all – give a call to action that causes the reader to reflect on the issue.  In a real-life context, this call of action would induce the reader to take action on the basis of the arguments put forth.

how to teach opinion writing to grade 6

The Effective Approach to Teaching Opinion Writing

Now that all the structural elements of an opinion essay have been dissected, how does one go about teaching them explicitly to students – that is the question.

Based on my personal experience and in my opinion, the best approach would be to teach each structural component separately . This would entail providing ample practice and modeling on the elements involved.

Once students have a good understanding and practice of the structural components of each section, then they can write out the entire opinion essay, given a prompt. Prior to doing so, brainstorming ideas for each section on a graphic organizer would help structure students’ writing further and provide direction.

My Summary of How to Teach Opinion Writing to 3 rd , 4 th and 5 th Graders

So just a few take-away points for you when you next teach your 3 rd , 4 th, or 5 th graders how to write an opinion essay.

1. Teach students each structural component separately prior to having students write out the entire opinion essay based on a prompt.

2. Teach students how to write the introduction first in an opinion essay. This should include the different types of hooks, the opinion, and the thesis statement.

3. Teach students how to write the body of an opinion essay. This should also include each reason introduced by a topic sentence, 2-3 supporting details to support the reason, and a concluding sentence to conclude the paragraph and link back to the first reason in the topic sentence. This explicit teaching should be done for all body paragraphs.

4. Teach students how to write the conclusion which restates the writer’s opinion, provides a brief overview of the reasons, and gives a call to action.

5. And above all, remind students to edit their draft prior to publishing.

All this explicit teaching needs to be adequately supported by teacher modeling and ample student practice for each structural component of the opinion essay.

To conclude this post, structure provides focus and clarity of thought. Both of which we desire our students to have in order for them to turn out writing pieces that they are proud of and that we enjoy reading and – yes marking.

How to teach persuasive writing to 5th grade

Need a collection of self-written mentor texts ( no need to spend on books ), print-n-go sheets, interactive notebook activities, Scavenger Hunts, flipbooks, anchor charts, posters, checklists, and  marking rubrics  to teach your students a step-by-step approach to writing an opinion essay effectively? Then access the Opinion (Persuasive) Writing Growing Bundle.

Teaching Opinion Writing digitally? Learn more here.

And if you’d like a set of free Opinion Writing Signal Words posters to display in your classroom, access the link in the image below.

Opinion Writing Posters

Until Next Time…

teach 2Bto 2Btell 2Bsignature

5 thoughts on “How to teach Opinion Writing to 3rd, 4th and 5th Graders”

' src=

That’s great to know Luna – Thank you 🙂

' src=

Wow this is awesome!

Glad you liked this post! Thank you 🙂

Leave a Comment Cancel Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

growth mindset superhero class decor

Growth Mindset Quotes Classroom Decoration

Free Sentence Structure simple compound complex sentences

Simple Compound and Complex Sentences Examples

fathers day activities for students

Free Fathers Day Activities For Students

Tightening Tension in a narrative

Tightening Tension In A Gripping Narrative

Sizzling starts Narrative examples

Sizzling Starts Narrative Examples Strong Leads

Reading Comprehension Strategies Print & Digital Resources

20 Proven Reading Comprehension Strategies With Actionable Reading Responses

  • Terms of Use

COPYRIGHT © 2023 TEACH2TELL •  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED  •  SITE DESIGN BY LAURANE RAE

We noticed you're visiting from Australia. We've updated our prices to Australian dollar for your shopping convenience. Use United States (US) dollar instead. Dismiss

STAAR Prep: A K-5 Argumentative/Opinion Writing Strategy

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

As we all know here in Texas, every grade level will have an “extended constructed response” on the STAAR test this school year. This response will either be informational or argumentative and will be an “essay.” Let’s take a look at exemplars and rubrics before we dive into an argumentative/opinion writing strategy for the elementary grades.

STAAR Test Example Responses

Here are some exemplars for grades 3 and 5 (for both short and extended constructed responses) provided by TEA (Texas Education Agency). These prompts and exemplars come from the field test, and this document walks you through the scoring. I go over more information about the constructed responses, STAAR test tools, and provide a few resources in Reading Language Arts STAAR Test Resources .

STAAR Argumentative Writing Rubrics

  • RLA Grades 3-5 Argumentative/Opinion Writing Rubric   (10/18/22)
  • RLA Grades 3-5 Argumentative/Opinion Writing Rubric-Spanish   (10/18/22)
  • RLA Grades 3-5 Informational Writing Rubric   (10/18/22)
  • RLA Grades 3-5 Informational Writing Rubric-Spanish   (10/18/22)

What’s the Difference Between Short and Extended Constructive Responses?

Here are exemplars from the stand-alone field test. The 5th grade prompts and responses are for the same passage, “Steam and Sail”. The responses on the left are short constructed responses (SCR), and the one on the right is an extended constructive response (ECR). The grade 3 response is within the writing domain, not the reading domain. There are no exemplars for grades 3 and 4 to reference for ECR in the scoring guide.

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

How to Teach Argumentative/Opinion Writing

So, of course, there are lots of ways to teach opinion writing to elementary students. But I’m a huge fan of the Gradual Release of Responsibility (GRR) , and I’m also a huge fan of discussion and verbal practice before beginning the writing process. That said, I’m going to walk through using GRR with some resources for teaching opinion/argumentative writing at the elementary level. This strategy is adaptable and meant to be built on over time, so the example given isn’t necessarily 5th grade, score point 5 level, but it can get students there with practice and some adapting!

Review: Fact vs. Opinion

Whether you’re teaching first grade or fifth grade, it’s always good to start with a review of the difference between fact and opinion. Here are a few resources for this.

  • Florida Center for Reading Research Fact or Opinion Game
  • Factile Fact vs. Opinion Game
  • Teaching with a Mountain View: Four Activities to Teach Fact vs. Opinion in Upper Elementary

Talk Before You Write!

This is what I like to call, the “Speak Cycle.” Students may need to practice one or more of these steps, or the whole cycle, multiple times before moving on to writing. Speaking before writing helps students learn to organize their thoughts, look for text evidence, and also familiarizes them with proper sentence structures for opinion writing before they actually start writing. You might think, “Ok, maybe for lower elementary.” Sure, but even older students benefit from verbal practice before writing! It’s a form of rehearsal and planning.

1. Whole Group: Read the text. Discuss opinions as a class. Highlight the evidence.

Before broaching the topic of supporting evidence for an opinion, read the text and discuss opinions. Then ask students for supporting evidence. It’s much easier to talk about supporting evidence than it is to start writing about it from the get go! Here is an example text that works well for third and fourth grade from Education.com . I recommend starting with short texts and then, as stamina improves, introducing longer texts over time.

Education.com Argumentative/Opinion writing

“Today, we’re going to read a text together about ___________. We’re going to discuss our opinions on ___________ based on what we read, and I’m going to highlight facts from the text to help support our opinion.” [Read the text] [Read the question] “So, what are our opinions?” [Student one offers an opinion.] “Thanks for sharing your opinion! What information in this text led you to think that?” [Highlight what the student references in the text. Repeat this with other examples.] “Ok! So, from our reading today, we formed the opinion ______. And we formed that opinion because [read off highlights of the text].”

In this practice, you are showing the students how to identify and highlight supporting evidence in the text, but this is first a verbal exercise. Start with easier texts and move to more difficult texts as students become more autonomous.

You can create your own questions, but here are a few resources that offer texts with questions for opinion writing.

  • Education.com
  • Ereadingworksheets.com
  • National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE)

2. Small Group: Read the text. Discuss opinions with a small group. Highlight the evidence together.

This works best if you group students on similar reading levels. Give each student in the group the same short text that’s on their reading level. Read it together, discuss an opinion, and have students highlight the supporting facts with your guidance. Then, have students verbalize their opinions and reference the highlighted text evidence. Students should speak using the same sentence structures you want them to use when writing. Having these up as a visual is great for practice! This is all to get students ready to write.

  • “I think…”
  • “In my opinion,…”
  • “I believe that…”
  • “This is my opinion because…”
  • “According to the text,…”
  • “First, the author states…”
  • “Second, I read that…”

3. Independently: Students read the text, highlight evidence, and discuss their opinion and supporting evidence with a partner or group.

Have students read a short text, think about their opinion, and highlight facts to support their opinion on their own. Students can discuss an explanation of their opinion and text evidence with a partner, or they can explain it in a small group setting. Students should still be speaking using the same sentence structures you would like them to write with.

It’s Time to Write!

Now that students are familiar with reading, forming an opinion, highlighting evidence to support their opinion, and using sentence structures verbally, it’s time to start writing. But it’s not quite time for them to write independently. First, we will model good writing for them, following a similar process to the speaking cycle.

1. Whole Group: Read the text. Highlight the evidence. Model the writing for the class.

So this step is similar to step one of the speak cycle, but instead of just discussing, you are going to be modeling the writing. Here’s one formula I like to use called, “It’s Peanut Butter Jelly Time!,” and I’ve included an example using the video game article from the beginning of this post.

The Bread: The Introduction (2-3 sentences)

  • Write one sentence to state your opinion.
  • Write a second sentence introducing two main facts from the text that support your opinion.
“In my opinion, video games are harmful to kids. Video games can be unhealthy. They can also be too violent.” (Just an example! This is not necessarily reflective of my actual opinion on video games.)

The Peanut Butter : Paragraph 2 (2-3 sentences)

  • Write a few sentences to support the first fact.
“According to the text, video games can be unhealthy if children play them for too long and don’t move around or exercise. This can make kids overweight and have health issue.”

The Jelly : Paragraph 3 (2-3 sentences)

  • Write a few sentences to support the second fact.
“Sometimes, violence can make kids fight, and this can be harmful to friendships. Violence isn’t good for kids’ brains and can lead them to become bullies.”

The Bread: The Conclusion (2-3 sentences)

  • Say your opinion – again.
  • Say why your opinion is true – again.
“I believe that video games can be harmful to kids. Sitting for too long in front of the game can cause health problems and violence can lead to aggressive behavior. It’s better for kids to be active and be more positive and less violent.”

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

2. Partnered Writing: Students read the text together, highlight the evidence, and write with a partner.

It’s similar to the whole group exercise, except that students are practicing writing more independently with a writing partner/buddy. In this step, you can offer students graphic organizers or an outline template to help them remember all the elements of their argumentative writing. They can work together to write one essay or they can each write an essay and then review each other’s writing.

3. Independently: Read the text. Highlight the evidence. Write the essay.

At this stage, students are practicing writing on their own. They may or may not need supports like sentence starters, graphic organizers , checklists , and visuals to reference in the room. But the goal is for students to be able to produce writing that expresses their opinion in response to a text and provide text evidence to support that opinion.

Practice, Practice, Practice!

It takes a lot of time and a lot of repetitive practice. As Miguel Guhlin references in his article, Writing Strategies: Insights from a Twitter Chat , discussing, teaching sentence structures/vocabulary, and showing examples isn’t enough. Deliberate, repetitive practice, and time, are key to teaching writing.

Do you have other ideas, strategies, or resources that have worked well for you and your K-5 students when it comes to argumentative/opinion writing? Please share them with us in the chat! We’d love to hear what’s worked in your classroom.

Additional STAAR and TEKS Articles You May Find Useful

Reading Language Arts STAAR Test Resources

The K-5 ELAR TEKS and Free, Editable Spreadsheets

The K-5 Math TEKS and Free, Editable Spreadsheets

A Practical Strategy for Teaching Editing Skills

A Powerful and Easy Strategy for Teaching Text Evidence

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Emily has been in education since 2008. Prior to joining TCEA in 2021, she worked as a preK-8 grade principal for four years. Additionally, she taught middle school music, preschool, prekindergarten, and second grade in a trilingual school setting. Before that, she was a K-8 technology integrator and taught second through fifth grade enrichment classes and kindergarten, fifth, and sixth grade technology classes. She has a master’s degree in teaching, specializing in elementary education, and her Certificate of School Management and Leadership (CSML) from Harvard Graduate School of Education. Outside of work, she enjoys seeing movies, attending concerts, going camping and hiking, and spending time with her two cats.

Writing Strategies: Insights from a Twitter Chat

Resources shared at the 2023 tcea convention & exposition, you may also like, five powerful citation tools to unlock academic success, nanowrimo’s young writer’s program (ywp), ai meme generators and classroom activities, cer resources for the science classroom, two new google ai tools: help me write..., how reliable are ai detectors, what you need to know about copyright, nine tips for overcoming test anxiety, four ways ai can help teach poetry, seven ways teachermade can help you prepare for....

' src=

Loved the succinct info!

Leave a Comment Cancel Reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

You've Made It This Far

Like what you're reading? Sign up to stay connected with us.

*By downloading, you are subscribing to our email list which includes our daily blog straight to your inbox and marketing emails. It can take up to 7 days for you to be added. You can change your preferences at any time.  

You have Successfully Subscribed!

By subscribing, you will receive our daily blog, newsletter, and marketing emails.

Ready to receive FREE resources and engaging teaching ideas?

Your Thrifty Co-Teacher

A Teaching Blog

Opinion Writing Anchor Charts for Upper Elementary

January 16, 2021 by Cristy

Looking to support your students with their text-based writing? Opinion writing anchor charts make teaching easier & give students the support needed.

Teaching new writers how to gather evidence and plan for text-based writing can be challenging. Transitioning them over to actually writing the essay where they must weave those ideas into a well developed and organized essay is just as big of a task. Below, are some ways you can use opinion writing anchor charts to give 4th and 5th grade students tangible examples of how to make their writing focused, well-supported, and engaging.

Hooks for introduction paragraphs opinion writing for 4th grade.

1. Opinion Writing Hooks

Once students have a plan of action for their writing, introducing a writing “hook” is a natural place to begin when starting instruction of actually writing the essay.

Start off by explaining that a “hook” captures the reader’s interest and makes them want to continue to read. It should relate to and tightly tie into the topic that will be discussed.

Introduce the four most commonly used (and easiest to use) hooks.

  • Interesting Fact

Introductory paragraphs of opinion writing for 5th grade.

2. Introductory Paragraph

Now that students know how they will start their essay, they are ready to complete their introductory paragraph. For this quick lesson, tell students to start with their hook. Then, specify that writers need to include words from the prompt. This helps the reader know what the paper will be about and also helps the writer stay focused as they write. They can also include a preview to their answers in this paragraph.

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

3. Introduce the Components of Body Paragraphs

Body paragraphs are the heart of the essay. This is where the writer needs to provide the reasons they agree or disagree with the prompt. They also need to support their reasons with text evidence and elaborations.   

Many teachers are familiar with the acronym R.A.C.E. as a form of responding to a question. I like to use the acronym T.R.A.C.E. because it reminds the writer to use transitions within the essay and within the paragraphs.

During this step of instruction, it is beneficial to break down the acronym for your students. Introduce what each letter stands for. Explain that this is not a specific formula, but a guide that shows what should be included throughout the paragraph.

As you explain each letter, have students create an anchor chart and color code the text . Later in the writing process, this will help them identify what they are doing well and what they may need to add more of in their paragraphs.

R.A.C.E. can be helpful for body paragraphs of opinion writing.

4. Writing the Body Paragraphs

Now that you’ve discussed the components of a body paragraph and have taught students how to color code each letter, it’s time to model the writing.

Write the first body paragraph along with your students. It is best to write it on the board where they can all see it. Have students copy the sentences as you write them. Think aloud as you write. This will help students understand why you are including and excluding certain information.

Don’t be afraid to make mistakes and cross words or phrases out. Have students copy a few of these errors too. This will allow them to see that they can change their mind or fix errors.

Once you have completed the paragraph, color code the text. This will allow students to visually see the components of a body paragraph.

R.A.C.E. can be helpful for body paragraphs of opinion writing.

5. Introduce Types of Elaborations

Once students have seen you model a body paragraph, focus on the elaboration within the paragraph.

Introduce the four types of elaborations most frequently used within text-based writing.

  • Definition: tells the meaning of an unfamiliar word
  • Anecdote: a short story inserted into the text
  • Example: provides specific cases, samples, or instances
  • Scenario: a description of a possible event 

Provide Students with Opportunities to Practice

Although this is not a specific step in teaching writing, it is included because it is important to give students multiple opportunities to practice.

Depending on your students, you may want to focus on certain areas of a text-based writing lesson when you offer opportunities to practice. Do not feel the need to have students complete an entire prompt each time they write, especially at the start of the school year. 

Starting off with an overview, then moving on to certain parts before moving on to a complete essay can be a great way to scaffold this process for students. Offering students the opportunity to refer back to their opinion writing anchor charts as they write is also a key component to helping them become proficient writers.

Looking for More Support with Opinion Writing Anchor Charts?

Hopefully, these tips have helped you organize your beginning opinion writing lessons. 

If you would like the opinion writing anchor charts discussed, you can click on the image to take a closer look.

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

5th grade nonfiction writing samples

by: Jessica Kelmon | Updated: July 23, 2016

Print article

5th grade writing samples

When it comes to writing, fifth grade is a red-letter year. To prepare for the demands of middle school and high school writing, fifth graders should be mastering skills required for strong nonfiction writing . Learn more about your fifth grader’s writing under Common Core . All students should be learning three styles of writing:

Informative/explanatory writing

Reports that convey information accurately with facts, details, and supporting information.

Narrative writing

Stories, poems, plays, and other types of fiction that convey a plot, character development, and/or personal stories.

Opinion writing

Writing in which students try to convince readers to accept their opinion about something using reasons and examples.

Fifth grade writing sample #1

Bipolar Children

This student’s report starts with a decorative cover and a table of contents. The report has eight sections, each clearly labeled with a bold subhead, and includes a bibliography. At the end, this student adds three visuals, two images from the internet with handwritten captions and a related, hand-drawn cartoon.

Type of writing: Informative/explanatory writing

Fifth grade writing sample #2

The 442nd Regimental Combat Team

Dylan’s report is thorough and well organized. There’s a cover page, an opening statement, and four clear sections with subheads, including a conclusion. You’ll see from the teacher’s note at the end that the assignment is for an opinion piece, but Dylan clearly writes a strong informational/explanatory piece, which is why it’s included here.

Fifth grade writing sample #3

The Harmful Ways of By-Catch and Overfishing

This student includes facts and examples to inform the reader about by-catch and overfishing. Then, at the end, the student tries to convince the reader to take a personal interest in these topics and gives example of how the reader can take action, too.

Type of writing: Opinion writing

See more examples of real kids’ writing in different grades: Kindergarten , first grade , second grade , third grade , fourth grade .

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

6 ways to improve a college essay

Writing-tips-for-every-grade

Quick writing tips for every age

Writing on the wall

Writing on the wall

Why parents must teach writing

GreatSchools Logo

Yes! Sign me up for updates relevant to my child's grade.

Please enter a valid email address

Thank you for signing up!

Server Issue: Please try again later. Sorry for the inconvenience

Join my VIP teacher email club!

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

When I look back to my first experience teaching five paragraph essays to fifth graders, I can remember how terribly unprepared I felt.

I knew that the five paragraph essay format was what my students needed to help them pass our state’s writing assessment but I had no idea where to start.

I researched the few grade-appropriate essays I could find online (these were the days before Pinterest and Teachers Pay Teachers) and determined that there was a structure to follow.

Every essay followed the same basic structure. I taught the structure to my students and they did well.

I have been teaching five paragraph essay structure and everything that goes with it for several years now. I hope that after you read this blog post, you will have a good understanding of how to teach and grade five paragraph essays.

Once you’ve learned all about teaching basic essay structure, you’ll be ready to grow your writers from “blah” to brilliant! 

Teaching five paragraph essays is just one part of teaching 5th grade writing. Click here to find out exactly how I teach writing to my 5th graders! 

Five paragraph essays - Start with simple paragraphs!

Start with Simple Paragraphs

We always start with simple paragraphs.

Yes, this is basic, but if your students cannot write excellent paragraphs, their five paragraph essays will be train wrecks. Trust me!

We spend a while cementing paragraph structure:

Topic Sentence

Closing Sentence

I give students topics, they come up with their own topics, we write together, they write with a partner or independently, the more variety, the better.

We have fun with simple paragraphs. Then, it’s time to move on to body paragraphs.

Five paragraph essays - organize and write body paragraphs

Organize and Write Body Paragraphs

Please refer to my five paragraph essay organizer below.

The three body paragraphs are absolutely crucial to the success of the five paragraph essay.

Some teachers have trouble teaching the structure of five paragraph essays because they start with the introduction paragraph.

Always teach the body paragraphs first!

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

I had a teacher say to me once, “What’s the point of just writing parts of the essay? They need to write the entire five paragraphs to get all of the practice they need.”

I understand that point. However, think of it as building a house. Should you test out the foundation and make sure it’s sound and sturdy before building on top of it? Absolutely! That’s what we’re doing here.

The three body paragraphs are the foundation of the essay.

Ask students to write out their three body paragraphs just like they have practiced…Topic sentence…Detail 1…Detail 2…Detail 3…Closing Sentence.

I “ooooh and aaaah” over their three paragraphs. Students are on their way to five paragraph essays, so be sure to build their confidence.

Five paragraph essays - introduction paragraphs

Teach the Introduction Paragraph

I have to say, this is my favorite paragraph to teach. The introduction paragraph is what draws readers into the essay and makes them want to read more.

We start with what I call a “hook.” The hook captures the readers’ attention and can come in many forms: asking a question, making a bold statement, sharing a memory, etc.

After the hook, I ask students to add a sentence or two of applicable commentary about the hook or about the prompt in general.

Finally, we add the thesis sentence. The thesis sentence always follows the same formula: Restate the prompt, topic 1, topic 2, and topic 3.

That’s all you need to write an excellent introduction paragraph!

I do suggest having students write the introduction paragraph plus body paragraphs a couple of times before teaching the closing paragraph.

Five paragraph essays - teach the closing paragraph

Teach the Closing Paragraph

In the conclusion paragraph, we mainly focus on restating the thesis and including an engaging closing thought.

With my students, I use the analogy of a gift.

The introduction paragraph and body paragraphs are the gift and the conclusion paragraph is the ribbon that ties everything together and finishes the package.

When you talk about restating the thesis sentence, tell students that they need to make it sound different enough from their original thesis sentence to save their readers from boredom.

Who wants to read the same thing twice? No one!

Students can change up the format and wording a bit to make it fresh.

I enjoy teaching the closing thought because it’s so open to however students want to create it.

Ways to write the closing thought: ask a question, personal statement, call to action, or even a quote. 

I especially like reading the essays in which a quote is used as a closing thought or a powerful statement is used.

Example of a Five paragraph essays

Example of a full five paragraph essay

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Let’s Talk About Color-Coding!

Who doesn’t like to color? This is coloring with a purpose!

Training your students to color-code their paragraphs and essays will make grading so much easier and will provide reminders and reinforcements for students.

When students color-code their writing, they must think about the parts of their paragraphs, like topic sentences, details, and the closing sentence.

They will be able to see if they are missing something or if they’ve written something out of order.

Color-coding is a wonderful help for the teacher because you can skim to ensure that all parts of your students’ paragraphs and essays are present.

Also, when you are grading, you can quickly scan the paragraphs and essays. Trust me, you will develop a quick essay-grading ability.

I start color-coding with my students at the very beginning when they are working on simple paragraphs. I add the additional elements of the color-code as we progress through our five paragraph essays.

This is the code that I use:

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Let’s Talk About Grading Five Paragraph Essays!

Imagine a lonely, stressed teacher grading five paragraph essays on the couch while her husband is working the night shift.

That was me!

Seriously, guys, I would spend about ten minutes per essay. I marked every little error, I made notes for improvement and notes of encouragement. I reworked their incorrect structure.

Those papers were full of marks.

On Monday, I proudly brought back the essays and asked students to look over them and learn what they needed to fix for next time.

You can guess what happened… there were lots of graded essays in the trashcan at the end of the day.

Make grading five paragraph essays easier!

I decided that my grading practices had to change. I needed my weekends back and my students needed to find their own errors!

This is my best advice:

STOP correcting every error!

Your students are not benefiting from marks all over their writing. They need to find those errors themselves so that they will remember their mistakes and change their writing habits.

Do a quick scan of each student’s writing as soon as it’s turned in to you.

If there are major problems with a student’s writing, call him/her over individually and show him/her what needs to be fixed or put the student with a competent peer editor who will help them fix mistakes.

If you have several students who are struggling with a skill, like closing sentences, do a mini-lesson on this topic.

You can do a mini-lesson with a small group. However, I prefer doing mini-lessons with the entire class. The kids who need help will get it and the rest of your class will receive a refresher.

It’s OK if there are some small spelling/grammar mistakes!

If the errors are few and they don’t take away from the meaning/flow of the essay, I don’t worry about them.

Our students are still learning.

Even your brightest star writer will have a few spelling/grammar mistakes from time to time.

Don’t discourage students from writing because of small errors.

Students who receive papers back with markings all over them don’t think, “Oh boy, my teacher has made it so easy for me to make all of these corrections.” They are thinking, “What’s the point in writing? I must be a terrible writer. Look at all of these mistakes.”

If your students are taking a standardized writing assessment, the structure and flow of their essays will be worth much more than perfect spelling.

Need more help?

I created this five paragraph essay instructional unit for teachers who are new to teaching five paragraph essays OR just need all of the materials in one place.

“Teacher Talk” pages will guide you through the unit and this unit contains all materials needed to help students plan, organize, and write amazing five paragraph essays! Click here to check it out:

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

I have a freebie for you! Enter your first name and email address below. You’ll receive three original prompts with five paragraph essay organizers AND two lined final draft pages!

Once your students are good essay writers…

These task cards will help your students stay sharp on their five paragraph essay knowledge. Students will review hooks (attention-getters), thesis sentences, body paragraphs, topic sentences, closings, and more. Each card contains a unique writing example!

I suggest using these task cards as a quiz/test, scoot game, individual review, or cooperative group activity.

Click on the image to view these task cards:

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

To save this post for later, simply pin this image to your teacher Pinterest board!

21 comments.

Wow! I really enjoyed reading this. I’ve always stressed over the thought of teaching writing, but your blog makes me think I can do it successfully. Putting your writing packet on my TPT wish list!

Thank you, Shannon! I appreciate you taking the time to leave a comment. I am so glad that my blog post was helpful to you!

Thanks for the tips! When I taught 6th grade I taught this same subject matter, but struggled to get started. I wish I had this then!

I appreciate your comment! Teaching was much different before Pinterest, wasn’t it?!?

This helped me so much!🙂 thanks a lot, I imagined being one student of yours. I’d be so smart and good at essays! Would’ve been so much easier in person❤️❤️❤️

Thank you so much, Aizlyn!

Thank you so much for this! May I ask where I can see the rubric for scoring the compositions?

You are so welcome! Click on the resource link. Then, you will see the rubric in the preview!

Thank you so much,I am a parent and this really helped me be clear how to guide my son. God bless you always.,

Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment!

you are welcome!!!

This looks great! Looking forward to using your tips and freebies with my 6th graders. 🙂 THANK YOU.

You are so welcome! Thank you for taking the time to leave a comment!

Can’t wait to use this with my class tomorrow! Thanks a bunch for sharing!!

You are so welcome, Amy!

Thank you for making it easy to teach an essay with clarity.

You are very welcome, Yamuna! Thanks for taking the time to leave feedback 🙂

I am so happy I discovered your blog. I just started teaching grade 5 in September I have been searching for a simple method to hel me in guiding them in writing. I will be putting your method into practice in the coming week.

That’s wonderful, Cherry! Thank you for sharing your thoughts! Welcome to fifth grade 🙂

Beautiful lesson well explained! Thank you so very much .

Thank you so much, Cheryl!

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Notify me of follow-up comments by email.

Notify me of new posts by email.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

You may also enjoy...

History Book Clubs in Upper Elementary

Implementing History Book Clubs in Upper Elementary

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Tips for Working with a Difficult Teaching Partner

Teaching Social Studies Help for Teachers

Teaching Social Studies Crash Course

Virtual Field Trip Idea - Museum of the American Revolution

Virtual Field Trip Idea: Museum of the American Revolution

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

History Remix Project

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Up Your Teacher Game with Withitness!

What can i help you teach, find it here, let's connect, i'd love to connect with you.

Enter your first name and email address to join my exclusive VIP email club.

Copyright © 2020  | Thrive in Grade Five | All Rights Reserved

Quick Links

free opinion writing examples for 5th grade

All Formats

Resource types, all resource types.

  • Rating Count
  • Price (Ascending)
  • Price (Descending)
  • Most Recent

Free opinion writing examples for 5th grade

Preview of Free OREO Opinion Writing Outline and Graphic Organizer with Anchor Chart

Free OREO Opinion Writing Outline and Graphic Organizer with Anchor Chart

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

  • Google Slides™

Preview of Free Winter Writing Prompts | Grades 3-5

Free Winter Writing Prompts | Grades 3-5

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

3rd, 4th, 5th Grade Opinion Writing Unit - Expository Mini Lessons

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

  • Google Apps™

Preview of Elf Opinion Writing {freebie}

Elf Opinion Writing { freebie }

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Freebie ...Forming Opinions Before, During, and After Reading

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

FREEBIE : O.R.E.O Opinion Poster ( Writing Visual)

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Persuasive Writing

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Narrative, Informational, & Opinion Writing Unit BUNDLE

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

ALL YEAR LONG Writing Bundle | Growing Bundle | Grades 2-5 | Digital & Print

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

FREE STEM Opinion Essay/Persuasive Essay Unit

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Digital + Print Persuasive Writing Activity (Recess)

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Writing Prompts Response to Reading, Personal Narratives, Opinion , and MORE

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Biography Report Trifold Brochure Graphic Organiser [ FREE ]

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Fact or Opinion poster

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Persuasive Writing Graphic Organizer (Positions and Arguments)

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Knowledge Organiser (KO)/Revision Mat, German - KS3 - Music, Film, TV & Internet

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

Animal Themed Paragraph Practice & Order Sheets & Hamburger Paragraph Organizer

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

  • We're hiring
  • Help & FAQ
  • Privacy policy
  • Student privacy
  • Terms of service
  • Tell us what you think

Jump to navigation

  • Inside Writing
  • Teacher's Guides

Student Models

  • Writing Topics
  • Minilessons
  • Shopping Cart
  • Inside Grammar
  • Grammar Adventures
  • CCSS Correlations
  • Infographics

Student Writing Models

How do I use student models in my classroom?

examples of opinion essays 5th grade

When you need an example written by a student, check out our vast collection of free student models. Scroll through the list, or search for a mode of writing such as “explanatory” or “persuasive.”

Jump to . . .

Explanatory writing.

  • How Much I Know About Space Explanatory Paragraph
  • My Favorite Pet Explanatory Paragraph
  • Sweet Spring Explanatory Paragraph

Narrative Writing

  • A Happy Day Narrative Paragraph
  • My Trip to Mexico Narrative Paragraph

Creative Writing

  • Happy Easter Story Paragraph
  • Leaf Person Story

Research Writing

  • Parrots Report
  • If I Were President Explanatory Paragraph
  • My Dad Personal Narrative
  • The Horrible Day Personal Narrative

Response to Literature

  • One Great Book Book Review
  • A Fable Story
  • Ant Poem Poem
  • The Missing Coin Story
  • Winter Words Poem
  • Horses Report
  • Ladybugs Report
  • How to Make Boiled Eggs How-To

Persuasive Writing

  • Plastic, Paper, or Cloth? Persuasive Paragraph
  • The Funny Dance Personal Narrative
  • The Sled Run Personal Narrative
  • Hello, Spring! Poem
  • Cheetahs Report

Business Writing

  • Dear Ms. Nathan Email
  • My Favorite Place to Go Description
  • My Mother Personal Essay
  • Rules Personal Essay
  • Shadow Fort Description
  • Adopting a Pet from the Pound Editorial
  • Letter to the Editor Letter to the Editor
  • Ann Personal Narrative
  • Grandpa, Chaz, and Me Personal Narrative
  • Indy’s Life Story Personal Narrative
  • Jet Bikes Personal Narrative
  • The Day I Took the Spotlight Personal Narrative
  • A Story of Survival Book Review
  • Chloe’s Day Story
  • Did You Ever Look At . . . Poem
  • Dreams Poem
  • I Am Attean Poem
  • Sloppy Joes Poem
  • The Civil War Poem
  • The Haunted House Story
  • The Terror of Kansas Story
  • When I Was Upside Down Poem
  • Deer Don’t Need to Flee to Stay Trouble-Free! Report
  • Height-Challenged German Shepherd Report
  • Friendship Definition
  • What Really Matters News Feature
  • Cheating in America Problem-Solution
  • Hang Up and Drive Editorial
  • Musical Arts Editorial
  • Summer: 15 Days or 2 1/2 Months? Editorial
  • A Cowboy's Journal Fictionalized Journal Entry
  • Giving Life Personal Narrative
  • The Great Paw Paw Personal Narrative
  • The Racist Warehouse Personal Narrative
  • Limadastrin Poem
  • The Best Little Girl in the World Book Review
  • How the Stars Came to Be Story
  • Linden’s Library Story
  • My Backyard Poem
  • The Call Poem
  • I Am Latvia Research Report
  • Mir Pushed the Frontier of Space Research Report
  • The Aloha State Research Report
  • The Incredible Egg Observation Report
  • Unique Wolves Research Report
  • Dear Dr. Larson Email

Personal Writing

  • A Lesson to Learn Journal
  • Caught in the Net Definition
  • From Bed Bound to Breaking Boards News Feature
  • If Only They Knew Comparison-Contrast
  • Save the Elephants Cause-Effect
  • Student Entrepreneur Reaches for Dreams of the Sky News Feature
  • Internet Plagiarism Problem-Solution
  • Mosquito Madness Pet Peeve
  • Anticipating the Dream Personal Narrative
  • Huddling Together Personal Narrative
  • H’s Hickory Chips Personal Narrative
  • It’s a Boy! Personal Narrative
  • My Greatest Instrument Personal Narrative
  • Snapshots Personal Narrative
  • Take Me to Casablanca Personal Narrative
  • The Boy with Chris Pine Blue Eyes Personal Narrative
  • The Climb Personal Narrative
  • The House on Medford Avenue Personal Narrative
  • Adam’s Train of Ghosts Music Review
  • Diary of Gaspard Fictionalized Journal Entry
  • My Interpretation of The Joy Luck Club Literary Analysis
  • Mama’s Stitches Poem
  • The KHS Press Play
  • Rosa Parks Research Report
  • The Killer Bean Research Report
  • Mid-Project Report on History Paper Email
  • Vegetarian Lunch Options at Bay High Email

IMAGES

  1. Opinion sample writing

    examples of opinion essays 5th grade

  2. Opinion Writing 5Th Grade Rubric

    examples of opinion essays 5th grade

  3. 010 Opinion Essays Of Persuasive Writing Informative 5th Grade How To

    examples of opinion essays 5th grade

  4. 5th grade essay writing worksheets fifth how to write a

    examples of opinion essays 5th grade

  5. Writing opinion essays 5th grade

    examples of opinion essays 5th grade

  6. 😀 Opinion topics for 5th grade. 5th Grade Opinion Essay Topics. 2019-01-15

    examples of opinion essays 5th grade

VIDEO

  1. Opinion Writing Lesson

  2. Developing Teachers to Improve Lesson Plans Using Technology EAD 523

  3. Differences of opinion😢

  4. Non popular opinion. Essays and research projects are so much fun. #essay #shorts

  5. LECTURE: 18 Pattern 2024 IELTS writing Task 2 by Rumi Consultant IELTS

COMMENTS

  1. 30 Great 5th Grade Opinion Writing Prompts

    30 5th Grade Opinion Writing Prompts and Ideas What is the best thing about living in America? Would you rather be the smartest, kindest, or funniest person in the class? Why? What is the most effective way to help people less fortunate than yourself? Is it important for kids to learn about current events?

  2. PDF Grade 5 English Language Arts Opinion / Argument

    Background Information Writing Sample Title: Be Careful When You Let Your Dog Off Leash Text Type and Purpose: Grade level/Content area: Type of Assignment: Standards Addressed: Opinion/Argument Grade 5 English Language Arts Essay (W.5.1), (W.5.4), (L.5.1), (L.5.2), (L.5.5), (L.5.6)

  3. Opinion Writing- Grade 5

    Informational/Opinion Writing Grade 5 Sample Autumn Feedback for Improvement Topic: Autumn - my favorite season Main Reason#1: changes in nature Main Reason #2: animals prepare Main Reason #3: weather changes What worked: Organization: This piece includes an introduction, three main reasons and a conclusion.

  4. 5th Grade Writing Samples

    95361. 209-848-4884. 5th Grade Writing Samples - Oakdale Joint Unified School District.

  5. Scaffolding an Opinion Writing Essay With Frames and Templates

    Teaching opinion writing to your 3rd, 4th, or 5th grade students soon? Use the sentence starters and paragraph frames below in your lessons to help students structure their writing, use transitional words, stay on topic, and support their opinions. Templates like the examples below are a great way to introduce opinion writing.

  6. 61 Awesome Opinion Writing Prompts for 5th Grade Students

    Opinion Writing Prompts for 5th Grade Students Nurture students in sharing their thinking using these opinion writing prompts for 5th grade. 1. In your opinion, should distance learning be the primary way to learn with in-person school only an option? 2. Do you think it's important for individuals to learn a second language? Why or why not? 3.

  7. PDF 5th Opinion Annotated Samples

    5th Grade Opinion . Prompt: Pennies . Statement of purpose Focus and Organization Conventions 4 4 2 Through brief examples and rhetorical questioning, the student engages the reader and previews the essay in an argumentative fashion with the main idea. The student clearly uses evidence from the text to drive her main idea. Student uses

  8. PDF Opinion Writing

    Opinion Writing . Teaching Students to Voice their Opinions Effectively with the Common Core Standards . Rachel Fielhauer . Fifth Grade Teacher . Legend Elementary . Newark City Schools . [email protected] . Reading Recovery Conference . Columbus, Ohio . February 2, 2013

  9. How to teach Opinion Writing to 3rd, 4th and 5th Graders

    Definition The first two starters are popular starters and I often encourage my 5 th graders to use either of them in their introduction. Writing the Opinion of an Opinion Essay Right after the hook, students write their opinion on the issue after weighing the pros and cons.

  10. PDF Big 1 DR8.11

    Grade 5, Prompt for Opinion Writing Common Core Standard W.CCR.1 (Directions should be read aloud and clarified by the teacher) Name: Before you begin: On a piece of lined paper, write your name and grade, the date, the name of your school and your state, and your teacher's name. You will use this paper for writing. The Best Pet

  11. Introduction to Opinion Writing // 5th Grade Writing Online Lesson

    This lesson focuses on the components of opinion writing for a fifth grader.This is a series of videos that start at reading the passage and prompt in order ...

  12. PDF Opinion Writing Checklist: Grade 5

    Did I write like a fifth grader? YES! NO Introduction I clearly introduced my topic in an engaging way by asking a question, explaining why the topic mattered, telling a surprising fact, or giving background information. I provided a strongly stated opinion or claim. Organization

  13. STAAR Prep: A K-5 Argumentative/Opinion Writing Strategy

    The Bread: The Introduction (2-3 sentences) Write one sentence to state your opinion. Write a second sentence introducing two main facts from the text that support your opinion. "In my opinion, video games are harmful to kids. Video games can be unhealthy. They can also be too violent." (Just an example!

  14. PDF Opinion/Argument Writing Packet Grades 3-6

    7 Progression of Opinion to Argument Writing 8 Persuasion vs. Argument 9 Opinion/Argument and College and Career Readiness - Michelle Karns 10 Opinion/Argument Writing in the new Common Core Standards - Standards for K-8 11-12 CCCS Anchor Paper Grade 4 13-14 CCCS Anchor Paper Grade 6 15-16 CCCS Writing Rubric for Grade 5-SAMPLE 17 Write a...

  15. Search Printable 5th Grade Opinion Writing Worksheets

    Cite and Explain Your Evidence #1: Literary Response Worksheet Crafting a Thesis Statement: Literary Essay Writing Worksheet Opinion: The First and Fourth Amendments Worksheet Civil Rights: The Later Years of the Movement Worksheet Supporting Opinions Worksheet Novel Study: The One and Only Ivan: Pre-Reading Activity Worksheet

  16. Opinion Writing Anchor Charts for Upper Elementary

    Below, are some ways you can use opinion writing anchor charts to give 4th and 5th grade students tangible examples of how to make their writing focused, well-supported, and engaging. 1. Opinion Writing Hooks. Once students have a plan of action for their writing, introducing a writing "hook" is a natural place to begin when starting ...

  17. 5th grade nonfiction writing samples

    Fifth grade writing sample #1 Bipolar Children This student's report starts with a decorative cover and a table of contents. The report has eight sections, each clearly labeled with a bold subhead, and includes a bibliography.

  18. Five Paragraph Essays

    We always start with simple paragraphs. Yes, this is basic, but if your students cannot write excellent paragraphs, their five paragraph essays will be train wrecks. Trust me! We spend a while cementing paragraph structure: Topic Sentence. Detail #1. Detail #2. Detail #3. Closing Sentence.

  19. Results for sample of opinion essay grade 5

    The Language Arts Gallery. This is a 22-page study guide for the Florida Teacher's Exam for General Knowledge Essay Sub-test. It includes 5 sample essays. It also covers the structure of an academic essay and how it applies to several different genres of academic writing, including: Opinion Persuasive Comparative Advantages v.

  20. PDF Grade 5 Writing Exemplars with Annotations

    PROMPT Write an essay explaining how John Woodruff and Wilma Rudolph worked hard to achieve their goals. Your essay must be based on the ideas, concepts, and information from the "Stopping for Olympic Gold" and "Fastest Woman in the World" passage set. Plan carefully so that you can: read the passages; plan your response; write your response; and

  21. Results for free opinion writing examples for 5th grade

    (270) $6.00 PDF Easel Activity This opinion writing unit is for the 4th and 5th grade classroom. If you're looking for an opinion writing graphic organizer with reasons and examples, this is the resource for you! It includes anchor text and all graphic organizers. Use the teacher models to give solid examples during your mini-lesson.

  22. PDF Samples of Proficient Writing with Commentaries Grade 5

    single example is provided for most writing applications. A single example is, clearly, insufficient to fully describe proficiency for any writer, at any grade level, or for any writing application. Over time, many additional samples will be included to represent the scope and range of proficiency. Teachers are invited to submit samples of ...

  23. Student Writing Models

    Student Models. When you need an example written by a student, check out our vast collection of free student models. Scroll through the list, or search for a mode of writing such as "explanatory" or "persuasive.".