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University of Michigan Essay Examples (And Why They Worked)

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The following University of Michigan essay examples were written by authors who were admitted to University of Michigan (UMich). All names have been redacted for anonymity. Please note that CollegeAdvisor.com has shared these essays with admissions officers at University of Michigan in order to deter potential plagiarism.

For more help with your University of Michigan essays, check out our 2020-2021 University of Michigan Essay Guide ! For more guidance on personal essays and the college application process in general, sign up for a monthly plan to work with an admissions coach 1-on-1.

Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School (including preferred admission and dual degree programs) to which you are applying at the University of Michigan. How would that curriculum support your interests?

Given the excellent academic program, the University of Michigan provides a wonderful opportunity for me to learn and grow both as a student and person. During my recent tour of campus, I was excited about the idea that I had the potential to make a mark on this large university. Furthermore, I got the sense that there were many opportunities for me to create a community, excel in a variety of academic and leadership areas, and prepare myself for an exciting and fulfilling career.

I am most interested in the Program in Biology within the College of Literature, Science and the Arts. As an avid life science student with a keen interest in environmental science and biodiversity, I am most interested in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology major. In my AP biology course, for instance, the lab I found most interesting involved animal behavior with response to wet and dry environments. As a student within the Department of EEB, I would be able to learn more about biodiversity and the history of life on earth. The depth and breadth of the curriculum, including classes such as Animals Functioning in Environments and Animal Diversity, would be particularly interesting to me. Another exciting unique opportunity is the University of Michigan’s Biological Station in the Great Lakes region. As a member of a research team, I would be able to examine natural habitats and do lab experiments in the field. I am more than excited to be part of such a scientific community. I am also interested in exploring forest succession and ecosystem processes through the Forest Ecosystem Study. Furthermore, I would be interested in studying abroad during my time at Michigan. One program that interested me was the CGIS trip to the London School of Economics and Political Sciences where I could further my study of biology, but in a new setting. Michigan’s strength of curricular and hands-on opportunities would certainly offer me ways to continue and develop my interest in biology.

Outside of the classroom and field, I would like to share my enthusiasm about biology with like-minded students by joining the Biology Student Alliance and Society of Biology Students. And, while not directly related to biology and ecology, as a Michigan student, I look forward to joining the Michigan Academics Competition. As captain of my school’s Academic team, a Quiz Bowl style trivia competition, I enjoy researching and recalling science (and history) facts. As a biology student, I am confident that I would become one of the biology specialists on the Michigan Academics Competition and Quiz Bowl Team.

Michigan’s incredible opportunities within the Program of Biology would enable me to have access to a world class education. Furthermore, the unique field experience and research opportunities would enable me to make my mark on the University.

Why this University of Michigan essay worked, according to an ex-admissions officer

In this essay, the author begins by praising the University’s academics and then expresses how much of an opportunity it would be to get to matriculate at UMich. They uses energetic words and direct verbs. The sentences exude intention. In the first paragraph alone, this student tells us that they will hold dear an opportunity to attend UMich. They inform us that they will benefit as a person and a scholar and will also give back to the community while on campus.

The author then goes on to tell us what programs they would like to join at UMich. Yet while doing so, the author interjects their own interests, talents and experiences. By doing this, we can clearly see that the author has the curiosity and ability to effectively join these classes and programs. The author renders their own experiences in three dimensions, making it clear that they would be an excellent candidate.

The writer walks us through exactly what they plan to study and how they hope to integrate into the community. This inspires confidence in us as readers.

This student would be an avid contributor to UMich. Though the essay is direct, it has complexity and ends by reiterating that this student intends to make an impact. If you’re interested in attending UMich, don’t forget to use our College Search Feature! You’ll find all kinds of interesting information on everything from academics to financial aid along with helpful school-specific admissions resources.

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I always had a keen interest in numbers, probability, and finance. Early on, I could run numbers quickly: calculating sales tax, analyzing probabilities, and visualizing complex mathematical models in my head. After taking two AP classes in economics and one in statistics, I became increasingly intrigued with the mathematical representations of the different product and labor markets of the economy and modeling statistical outcomes, sparking my desire to pursue a career in that field through preferred action admission to Ross. Thus, I have set my sights on becoming an actuary since risk management is highly intriguing and allows me to use my talents in mathematical and statistical analysis as well as in written and verbal communication. The curriculum at Ross, coupled with the liberal arts requirements, will provide me with the necessary background to pursue my career goals.

At Ross, I will have the privilege of pursuing a Bachelor in Business Administration, providing me with a well-rounded background in management and economic analysis. I am particularly looking forward to the TO 301: Business Analytics and Statistics course taught by Dr. Shimi Nassiri, as it develops the skills of proper statistical and economic analysis and subsequent decision making. As well, it provides in-class experience of analyzing and modelling real data sets. I am also invested in Dr. Nassiri research of more efficient and effective healthcare solutions. As a Hispanic teenager, I feel very strongly about Dr. Shima Nassiri research on health care as it greatly impacts both the Hispanic and other minority communities. I am also eager for the 360° Thinking portion of the Ross curriculum. Particularly, the junior year course MO 300: Behavioral Theory in Management greatly intrigues me. It entails an in depth analysis of societal trends and how to develop creative and efficient responses as a manager. This class would provide a strong foundation for me in the analysis of social sciences and how they intertwine with economics. Additionally, what draws me to Ross is the emphasis on teambuilding and leadership skills which play a crucial role in molding successful business leaders in today’s rapidly changing world economy. My experience as a faculty-selected “Peer Leader” at Manalapan High School has provided a gateway into the fundamentals of leadership, and I look forward to expanding my skills through the unique leadership portion of the Ross curriculum as well as various leadership programs, such as the Leadership Experience Program (LDRx). The opportunity to develop both the tangible and intangible skills, which separate the accomplished leaders from the rest of the pack, will help me to create meaningful relationships both in the business world and the greater world community.

While I expect to learn a great deal at Ross, I feel my upbringing will permit me to contribute to Ross. I grew up surrounded by Latin salsa, spices, sights, and sounds, but that was not all. Since my parents immigrated from Cuba, I grew up with stories of the political and economic struggles my family faced. It is through these stories that I have gained an understanding of the influence of leadership and the importance of economical and statistical analysis to grow an economy. I hope to share my cultural background and perspective as a Hispanic man at Ross.

This essay leaves me with absolutely no doubt that this student belongs on the Ross campus at UMich. He begins very directly by telling us about himself and his skill set. He gives us a brief evolution of his mathematical interests — how they started and where he will direct them.

He has researched Ross, knows one of their leading professors, knows her academic body of work, knows the specific classes, and has made himself a 4 year plan regarding what he will take and to which programs he will add. He very articulately describes this progression. The reader can clearly imagine him as an enthusiastic participant.

Intermittently, this student references how his education will be applied in healthcare and leadership capacities. He also shares his Cuban culture with us, reminding us that he is more than just academics. Finally, he finishes with a proud determination he will be a Hispanic Ross Man. How could we question that?

These University of Michigan essay examples were compiled by the advising team at CollegeAdvisor.com . If you want to get help writing your University of Michigan application essays from CollegeAdvisor.com Admissions Experts , register with CollegeAdvisor.com today.

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August 8, 2022

Tips for Answering the University of Michigan Supplemental Essay Prompts [2022 – 2023]

Tips for Answering the University of Michigan Supplemental Essay Prompts [2022 – 2023]

The University of Michigan is a large (over 40,000 students), predominantly residential campus located in the small city of Ann Arbor. This well known school has an outstanding reputation for research, academic rigor and athletic spirit—it is often referred to as a public-Ivy. It offers a non-binding Early Action option with an application deadline of November 1st and accepts either the Common Application or Coalition Application with no preference. In the university’s efforts to gain a deeper understanding of the sort of student you might become at the University of Michigan, your application will ask you to write a main essay for whichever application type you select, as well as three supplemental essays.

Before you begin writing, take the time to research and identify what appeals to you most about the school . Consider location, athletics, academic programs, residential colleges, professors, particular clubs, study abroad programs, and anything else that attracts you to the University of Michigan. These responses are your opportunity to share more about yourself to make the strongest possible case for both your potential fit with the school and for the ways in which an education at UM will prepare you for the future.

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Below are some suggestions to help you address the supplemental prompts.

The University of Michigan supplemental essay questions

University of michigan supplemental essay #1.

Everyone belongs to many different communities and/or groups defined by (among other things) shared geography, religion, ethnicity, income, cuisine, interest, race, ideology, or intellectual heritage. Choose one of the communities to which you belong, and describe that community and your place within it. (Required for all applicants; 1,500 character limit )

If you have applied to other selective schools, you are likely to be familiar with this sort of “diversity” prompt . What they are getting at is your personal story and how you might relate with others of similar and different life experiences. While there might be some overlap in how these communities/groups are defined, try to focus on the precise intersection that shapes your sense of identity. Describe how each factor contributes to who you are and how you engage with the world around you. Your story does not have to be exotic ; it just needs to reveal your sense of self-awareness, of both the world you come from and your place within it. Diversity is essential to the University of Michigan, as showcased on its website: “U-M is committed to creating a campus environment of equity and inclusion where students, faculty, and staff with diverse backgrounds live, learn, and work together.” As you tell your story, consider how you will contribute to and benefit from this diverse atmosphere. How might you connect with other students, faculty, staff and the community at the University? Do your research and consider specific ways you can get involved.

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University of Michigan supplemental essay #2

Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School (including preferred admission and dual degree programs) to which you are applying at the University of Michigan. How would that curriculum support your interests? (Required for all applicants; 2,750 character limit )

This is another opportunity to demonstrate that you’ve done your homework and identified distinctive aspects of the program at the University of Michigan. You must communicate what appeals to you and how the specific program/curriculum will prepare you to achieve your goals. If you are undecided, you can speak to your areas of interest and how you might explore them at the University of Michigan. Consider the 14 different undergraduate Schools and Colleges it boasts to determine which might be the best prospective home for you. Be sure to notice that many programs at the university do not require application until your second year of college. Most students at the University of Michigan are admitted to the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts (LSA) for their first year of study, while others (business school students, for example) go through the Preferred Admission process while still in high school, which allows them sophomore entry to a particular School/College provided they meet certain academic conditions. 

If you are applying to a School/College that predominantly admits new classes via Preferred Admission (e.g., Ross School of Business), it is critical that you decide now, while still a high school student, which School/College you’re targeting; it can be difficult to transfer from one School/College to another after your first year of study, even with exceptional grades. Review the degree/graduation requirements—what do you find attractive or what might be beneficial to you about this particular school? Why is this specific school such a good match for your interests, learning style, or ultimate goals? Provide details and support your statements with reasons why a particular program or School at the University of Michigan is the ideal place for you !

School of Education applicants only

Discuss where you would like to teach and/or the types of students you would like to teach and how you developed this commitment.

This is a question asking as much for information about your teaching future and desires as it is for your teaching history and your passions and skills up to the present. Be sure to demonstrate past experience, passion, and values that are all relevant to the field of teaching, as well as relatively specific goals and reasons behind them.

Final thoughts on applying to the University of Michigan

As a school that accepts the Common Application , the University of Michigan is committed to a holistic review of your application materials. This means it takes all aspects of your application into account. Don’t miss your opportunity to stand out among your peers; provide a genuine sense of your character through your essay responses!

To provide some context for where you might stand, of the 79,743 students who applied to enter the class of 2025 at the University of Michigan, 16,071 or about 20% were offered admission. The interquartile (middle 50th percent) ranges for SAT scores were between 1400 and 1540. For ACT scores, they ranged from 32 to 35. The average entering GPA was 3.9 on a 4.0 scale. This is a competitive applicant pool.

While keeping these statistics in mind, take a moment to relax and plan. Make sure you meet all deadlines and allow yourself adequate time to write and revise your essays . Consider the best way to communicate your personal experiences, convey your interests, express your enthusiasm for learning, and demonstrate how and why the University of Michigan is the best place for you!

If you’re applying to the University of Michigan, you already know you’re up against tight competition. Don’t be overwhelmed. Get the guidance of an experienced admissions specialist who will help you stand out from a highly competitive applicant pool so you can apply with confidence, and get accepted! Click here to get started!

Ivy League and Common Application Tips: How to get Accepted

Related Resources:

  • From Example to Exemplary , a free guide to writing great application essays
  • The Essay Whisperer: How to Write a College Application Essay
  • Mining Identity for College Essays, Personal Statements

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Scholarship Application Tips

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Making Yourself a Strong Scholarship Candidate

  • Maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0
  • Get (and stay) involved in on-campus extracurricular activities and student organizations
  • Explore Engineering options and gain experience through research, internships, co-ops, or one of the student Engineering teams on campus

Writing a Good Scholarship Essay

Remember, your essay is the best means you have to distinguish yourself from everyone else applying for a scholarship! Consider the following tips as you craft your scholarship essay or personal statement:

  • Avoid writing a purely pragmatic essay that lists your GPA, activities, and accomplishments. Find a way to differentiate yourself from other applicants.
  • Reflect on what makes you unique! How can you present your uniqueness in a compelling story? What about your background, plans, and dreams  will engage the reader?
  • Think about essay structure. The first paragraph should include a compelling narrative that keeps the reader interested!
  • Explain what drove you to participate in certain activities or groups, what you have learned from your involvement, and why you continue to take part in them.
  • Consider the organization sponsoring the scholarship and the criteria they selected. What do you think they are looking for? Demonstrate that you share their passion, values, or goals.

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University of Michigan 2023-24 Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide

Regular Decision Deadline: Feb 1

You Have: 

University of Michigan 2023-24 Application Essay Question Explanations

The Requirements: One essay of 300 words, one essay of 550 words

Supplemental Essay Types:   Community , Why

1 . Everyone belongs to many different communities and/or groups defined by (among other things) shared geography, religion, ethnicity, income, cuisine, interest, race, ideology, or intellectual heritage. Choose one of the communities to which you belong, and describe that community and your place within it.

Required for all applicants. 300 words maximum..

This is a pretty standard community essay and admissions is giving you very specific instructions and launch points, both expected and unexpected, to draw from. You could be a part of an Italian Culture Club or a schnitzel appreciation association, either way, University of Michigan wants to hear about it. So try your best, despite the small space you are given, to answer all parts of this question. Describe the community and then detail how you contribute to that community. The point of this question is to show admissions you will add value and diversity to campus, and that you are a proactive and involved student who will help to build their community.

2.  Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School (including preferred admission and dual degree programs) to which you are applying at the University of Michigan. How would that curriculum support your interests?

Required for freshman applicants. 550 words maximum..

Here is your “why” essay, and it’s a nice, hefty one at 550 words.  Your answer should be mostly focused on the academic offerings: what you want to study, what subjects interest you, and how you will use the resources at your disposal to pursue your professional goals. This is where you prove to University of Michigan that they are a good fit for you and vice versa, and getting this essay right requires a lot of research. You’re going to want to dig deep into the programs that you’re interested in: find classes, professors, even extracurricular activities related to your desired major that interest you. The more specific you can get, the better. Show admissions that you know what differentiates U-M from other colleges and, in turn, you’ll distinguish yourself from other applicants. Finally, don’t forget to connect your own past experiences and accomplishments to the resources you choose to highlight. Paint the picture of where you’ll be found on campus (whether that be the bio lab, math building, or theatre) and what you hope to accomplish.

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September 11, 2023

2023-2024 University of Michigan Supplemental Essays Prompts

A building with several columns is featured beyond a lawn at the University of Michigan.

The University of Michigan has published its 2023-2024 admissions essays for applicants to the Class of 2028. And unlike many highly selective schools, the highly-ranked public university has not changed this year’s essay prompts in the wake of the United States Supreme Court ruling outlawing Affirmative Action. So, what are this year’s essay prompts, and how should applicants approach them? Let’s dive in!

2023-2024 UMichigan Essay Topics and Questions

Applicants to the University of Michigan are required to respond to both supplemental essays. For the first essay, the response should be a minimum of 100 words and a maximum of 300 words. For the second essay, the response should be a minimum of 100 words and a maximum of 550 words. Of course, regular readers of Ivy Coach’s college admissions blog know that applicants should use all the real estate students given to tell their stories by going to the maximum word count in all essays !

The two prompts are as follows:

1. Everyone belongs to many different communities and/or groups defined by (among other things) shared geography, religion, ethnicity, income, cuisine, interest, race, ideology, or intellectual heritage. Choose one of the communities to which you belong, and describe that community and your place within it. 

When the Supreme Court outlawed Affirmative Action , Chief Justice John Roberts penned a loophole in the majority opinion. In that opinion, he wrote, “Nothing in this opinion should be construed as prohibiting universities from considering an applicant’s discussion of how race affected his or her life, be it through discrimination, inspiration, or otherwise.” As such, through essays, schools could continue considering race within the context of its impact on applicants’ lives.

This loophole led many schools to adopt supplemental essays for the 2023-2024 admissions cycle asking about an applicant’s community, background, or experience. While worded differently, these prompts generally offer applicants the chance to write about the impact of their race (or faith, the town where they come from, etc.). But this prompt has long been a staple of the University of Michigan supplement. As such, Michigan didn’t need to change it one bit.

And remember, students need not be underrepresented minorities to answer this question powerfully. A community can mean many different things to many different students. It could be a community of mathematicians! The question is intentionally open-ended.

2. Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School (including preferred admission and dual degree programs) to which you are applying at the University of Michigan. How would that curriculum support your interests?

This essay prompt is a straight-up-the-middle Why College essay prompt , and it too has long been a staple of the Michigan application. Michigan wants to know that an applicant loves them and that they love them for the right reasons. Why? Because so many students who apply to Ivy League schools or Ivy League peer institutions also apply by November 1st to Michigan. And why? Because students are allowed to apply to any public school no matter their Early Decision/Early Action choice. So Michigan — fairly we might add — wants to know they’re not being used as a backup.

Thus, how can applicants make Michigan’s admissions committee believe the school is their first choice? That’s  easy ! By demonstrating they’ve done their homework on the school. The essay should be filled with specifics that only apply to Michigan on how a student will contribute their singular hook — rather than well-roundedness — to Michigan’s vibrant community.

Just about every sentence of the essay should be tailored to Michigan. If a sentence can apply to another university, it should be deleted. And, no, name-dropping professors or listing classes do not count as genuine specifics. Michigan’s admissions officers weren’t born yesterday. If a student approaches the Why Michigan essay like a game of Mad Libs in which they replace a specific from one school for a Michigan specific, they’ll see right through it.

Instead, students must capture the genuine, enduring specifics of the school — the programs, institutes, culture, traditions, activities, and so much more!

Ivy Coach’s Assistance with the University of Michigan Essays

If you’d like to optimize your case for admission to the University of Michigan, fill out Ivy Coach ’s free consultation form , and we’ll be in touch to delineate our college admissions counseling services for applicants to the Class of 2028.

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university of michigan engineering essay

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Common questions, essay questions.

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University of Michigan Questions

  • Everyone belongs to many different communities and/or groups defined by (among other things) shared geography, religion, ethnicity, income, cuisine, interest, race, ideology, or intellectual heritage. Choose one of the communities to which you belong, and describe that community and your place within it.  (Required for all applicants. 1,500 character limit.)
  • Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School (including preferred admission and dual degree programs) to which you are applying at the University of Michigan. How would that curriculum support your interests?  (Required for all applicants. 2,750 character limit.)
  • An optional essay  related to the impact of COVID-19 on the applicant. We encourage students to share their specific circumstances, and will bring empathy and compassion to our holistic review process.

Additional Question for Transfer Applicants:

  • Please provide a statement that addresses your reasons for transferring and the objectives you hope to achieve.  (1,500 character limit)

Marsal Family School of Education Transfer Applicants Only:

Please review the Educator Preparation Program (EPP) mission and vision statements below:

Mission: Our mission in the EPP at the Marsal Family School of Education is to prepare educators to support the well-being and learning of young people and to advance justice through their practice, advocacy, and activism. All pathways within the EPP leverage both research and the expertise of experienced educators to prepare novices for the complex work of supporting young people's learning and thriving, as well as that of their families and communities. We strive to uphold diversity and inclusion, and to advance justice and equity, in the field of educator preparation.

Vision: The EPP at the Marsal Family School of Education pursues a vision of educating toward justice.

Please address the following in your essay:

  • How does your experience prepare you to engage in a program with these commitments?
  • What goals do you have for your own career in light of these commitments?

The Common Application Personal Essay

The essay demonstrates your ability to write clearly and concisely on a selected topic and helps you distinguish yourself in your own voice. What do you want the readers of your application to know about you apart from courses, grades, and test scores? Choose the option that best helps you answer that question and write an essay using the prompt to inspire and structure your response. Remember: 650 words is your limit, not your goal. Use the full range if you need it, but don't feel obligated to do so.  (1,250-3,250 character limit, approx. 250-650 word limit. The application won't accept a response shorter than 250 words.)

  • Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.
  • The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?
  • Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?
  • Describe a problem you've solved or a problem you'd like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma-anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.
  • Discuss an accomplishment, event, or realization that sparked a period of personal growth and a new understanding of yourself or others.
  • Describe a topic, idea, or concept you find so engaging that it makes you lose all track of time. Why does it captivate you? What or who do you turn to when you want to learn more?
  • Share an essay on any topic of your choice. It can be one you've already written, one that responds to a different prompt, or one of your own design.

PRIDE MONTH

Fall Term 2021 Updates

Michigan Robotics

Work together, create smart machines, serve society.

  • Robotics Graduate Program

Academic Statement of Purpose and Personal Statement

The academic statement of purpose and personal statement should cover details about your academic background and career aspirations. You will want to talk about your engineering experiences, your motivation for pursuing a higher degree in Robotics, your long-term goals, as well as your specific interests.

The pair of statements should work together to inform us about your experiences and goals. However, don’t be redundant. Utilize the personal statement to expand upon your academic statement of purpose. If you want to write about the same topic, split it into two distinct pieces that cover different thoughts.

This format is meant to be flexible and allow for creativity: there is no single answer, however below is more guidance on each statement.

Academic statement of purpose

Talk technical, go deep, and talk about your engineering background.

Include your academic and research background, career goals, and how this graduate program will help meet career and educational objectives.

Applicants often don’t go deep or concrete enough into describing their engineering experience, whether an internship, project, or research. Showcase your technical writing, and your enthusiasm for your work. After describing one or more experiences in detail, including your contributions to the projects or tasks, discuss why graduate school is the next step for you. Make an argument for your unique qualifications and professional preparation, and what you hope to contribute to the field.

Personal statement

Talk about your inspiration, background, and academic or project pursuits.

Indicate how your personal background and life experiences, including social, cultural, familial, educational, or other opportunities or challenges, have motivated your decision to pursue a graduate degree at the University of Michigan. This is a discussion of the personal journey that has led to your decision to seek a graduate degree in Robotics.

Include your motivations to take your robotics career further. What concrete examples can you share of your academic and non-academic activities that might have prepared you for graduate study? Don’t be afraid to name collaborators in the field–our faculty often know many of them! But also talk about the work you did with those collaborators. Think of this as a story about your personal and professional development, and a proposal for your graduate school career.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

The academic statement of purpose should be approximately one to two pages, single spaced.

The personal statement should be approximately one to two pages, single spaced. Rackham’s 500 word limit does not apply.

No. We ask that all applicants submit two separate documents for the statement of purpose and personal statement. If an applicant submits one document we will contact them to request two separate documents. The Graduate Admission Committee requires two separate documents.

No, there are no formatting guidelines in regards to font type, font size, or margins.

No. Please review all application materials before submitting your application. 

Please note that once an applicant submits their online application, no changes to the statement of purpose, personal statement, curriculum vitae, and application can be modified online.

Many, many applicants talk about LEGOs. If you choose to take that risk, be sure to make it your own, unique, compelling, and personal storyline.

UMich Supplemental Essays 2023-24 – Prompts and Tips

July 25, 2023

university of michigan engineering essay

In forming the Class of 2027, the University of Michigan received over 87,000 applications, an all-time high. For historical comparison, there were under 24,000 applicants at the turn of the millennium. Therefore, it is safe to say that more students desire to become Wolverines in 2023 than ever before in the school’s 200+ year history. This greatly impacts the importance of the UMich supplemental essays.

The acceptance rate at UMich has fallen all the way down to 18%. However, this figure is typically twice as high for applicants who reside in the state of Michigan. If you are an out-of-stater or international student, you’ll need to bring even more impressive credentials than your in-state peers. Speaking of credentials, overall, the median SAT for current Wolverine undergrads is 1450, 77% placed in the top decile of their high school class, and the average unweighted GPA is 3.9+. If you possess statistics above those marks, you have a great shot of one day donning the maize and blue. However, you’ll still want to find ways to stand out against the intense competition.

(Want to learn more about How to Get Into UMich? Visit our blog entitled: How to Get Into the University of Michigan: Admissions Data and Strategies for all of the most recent admissions data as well as tips for gaining acceptance.)

Through its two essay prompts, the University of Michigan supplemental section still affords applicants an opportunity to showcase what makes them uniquely qualified for admission. Below are the University of Michigan supplemental prompts for the 2023-24 admissions cycle. The College Transitions team also offers tips about how to address each one:

2023-2024 University of Michigan Supplemental Essay Questions

1) Everyone belongs to many different communities and/or groups defined by (among other things) shared geography, religion, ethnicity, income, cuisine, interest, race, ideology, or intellectual heritage. Choose one of the communities to which you belong, and describe that community and your place within it. (Required for all applicants)

This can be done well whether you are talking about an ethnic, religious, or neighborhood community. It could even be a group of individuals who gather for a club, sport, or service project. Most applicants to the University of Michigan are involved in at least one “community”. You are the captain of a team, the editor-in-chief of your school paper, the president of a club… but don’t just rest on those laurels—instead, bring your involvement to life. Use your writing ability to show what type of community member you are rather than merely telling .

UMich Supplemental Essays (Continued)

You can also discuss how you have engaged with your high school local/community.  Further, you can share have learned from interacting with people of a different ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual identity, etc. Draw on past evidence of your commitment to being a positive force in your community and speculate how that is likely to manifest on the University of Michigan’s campus. You should research and cite UMich student-run organizations and/or local nonprofit groups. The Michigan admissions committee now desires to understand precisely how you will contribute to their campus community of 31,000+ undergrads. Drawing the link between your past efforts and future aims is critical here.

For example, if you dedicated many hours working with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities throughout high school, it will be most impactful if you express your commitment to joining UMich’s chapter of Best Buddies in the future.

2) Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School (including preferred admission and dual degree programs) to which you are applying at the University of Michigan. How would that curriculum support your interests? (Required for all applicants)

In some ways, this is your quintessential “Why Us?” essay, but UMich is particularly interested in hearing about why the curriculum in your desired academic department is attractive to you—not so much about your love for the football team or the beautiful campus. Below are some quick tips for writing an essay that will help your admissions cause:

  • Cite specific academic programs, professors, research opportunities , internship/externship programs, study abroad programs , student-run organizations , etc.
  • State why your chosen program is the perfect fit for you and why you are the perfect fit for it.
  • Show evidence of how your past/current academic endeavors/achievements will carry over onto UMich’s campus.
  • What special academically-related talents and passions will you bring to the University of Michigan? What contributions will you make?

You’ll want to dedicate time to researching more about your prospective college/department and what makes it truly world-class. The more specific you can get here, the better your UMich essays will be!

How important are they to the admissions committee?

Michigan deems two factors as “very important” in evaluating a candidate. These are the rigor of your secondary school record and GPA. The UMich essays—both the general Common App essay and the Michigan supplements—are rated as “important”. They sit alongside standardized test scores, recommendations, character/personal qualities, and first-generation college student status.

UMich Supplemental Essays – Want Personalized Essay Assistance?

If you are interested in working with one of College Transitions’ experienced and knowledgeable essay coaches as you craft your University of Michigan supplemental essays, we encourage you to get a quote today.

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Dave has over a decade of professional experience that includes work as a teacher, high school administrator, college professor, and independent educational consultant. He is a co-author of the books The Enlightened College Applicant (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016) and Colleges Worth Your Money (Rowman & Littlefield, 2020).

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"Engineering at Michigan"

University of Michigan

Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School (including preferred admission and dual degree programs) to which you are applying at the University of Michigan. How would that curriculum support your interests?

100 - 550 words

( University of Michigan )

The University of Michigan’s College of Engineering has a proactive approach to career path discovery and job search. While I do hope to aspire to a corporate attorney, an engineering degree from the University of Michigan would provide me the advantage of readiness.

U.S News and World Report published an article about challenges law school applicants with STEM degrees face. Number one was the lack of research skills. Michigan Undergraduate Engineering has research opportunities for all undergraduate students. I hope to even take advantage of The College of Engineering (CoE) International Internship Program. The chance to see the world and contribute to the world-class studies conducted by Michigan Engineering students is a unique quality. The article also reported that STEM applicants often lack job experience. Michigan Engineering hosts internship fairs, which even freshman can participate in. By utilizing the opportunity to work in a professional setting, I will be more adapt to presenting myself in a mature and respectable manor in a corporate setting.

Many people are puzzled by my aspirations to become a corporate lawyer with an engineering degree. While I enjoy learning about many areas of study, math and science have always peaked my interest. Like my attraction to law, I am drawn to the definitiveness of engineering specifically. While there is a right and wrong in methods and procedures, there is a chance to be creative; for the end goal is functionality. Law requires critical thinking, problem solving, and the questioning of presented facts and figures. These skills are also encompassed in Michigan Engineering. With a technical understanding of industry and engineering, I will be able to more accurately represent a corporation. Like the professors at Michigan Engineering, I hope to be an expert in my field. At Michigan Engineering, I will be educated by the best of the best. Professors that have been exposed to their fields in every aspect; allowing them to provide the best guidance to students. Instead of just presenting facts and figures in a courtroom, I will be able to understand and explain them.

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university of michigan engineering essay

A Guide to University of Michigan’s ‘Your Community’ Essay

This article is a first-person account by Robert Crystal, a CollegeVine livestream contributor. You can watch the full livestream for more info. 

What’s Covered:

Breaking down the prompt.

  • Defining Your Communities

The Purpose Behind Your Essay

Tips for writing your essay.

The University of Michigan asks all applicants to respond to its second prompt, which is about the different communities in your life. In this article, we will break down the prompt and go over the purpose behind your writing. By doing this, you can apply what you’ve learned to your own writing as you write your essay for the University of Michigan. 

Prompt 2: “Everyone belongs to many different communities and/or groups defined by, among other things, shared geography, religion, ethnicity, income, cuisine, interest, race, ideology, or intellectual heritage. Choose one of the communities to which you belong and describe that community and your place within.”

For this prompt, you have a 300-word limit to craft your response. This essay fits into a very popular type of essay known as the community essay. Colleges ask you to write about the different communities you are a part of to gain a better understanding of who you are as an individual. The point of all application essays is to provide information about yourself so the college admissions officers can build a better portrait of who you are outside of the classroom. Your grades and test scores are important to understanding who you are as a student but essays are all about your personality.

The University of Michigan is a university that prides itself on the openness and the connection of its community, both between students on campus and between the university and the city of Ann Arbor. For this reason, admissions officers at the University of Michigan want to read about how you’ve contributed to your community. This will give admissions officers a better idea of how you will impact their college community. 

Defining Your Communities 

The University of Michigan’s admissions officers want to learn about the type of person you are outside of the classroom so they can understand how you will fit into its student body. Through this essay, they will decide if you are the type of person they want at their university. To best respond to this prompt, make sure you are answering all their questions. 

Start by defining the different types of communities you are a part of. There is a lot of flexibility in defining what a community is. As stated in the prompt, your community does not only have to be geographical, ethnic, racial, or societal. Your community can be any group that you feel like you belong to and share something in common with. This community can consist of any individuals who share interests with you, such as sports, academic passions, extracurricular activities, or even a tight group of friends who have life values. 

In this essay, focus primarily on your contributions to the community you’re involved in instead of just describing the community itself. This is important because the purpose behind this prompt is to convey who you are and the values or interests you hold. Writing about your community is how admissions officers will gain this information about you. 

During every application cycle, admission officers want to create a well-rounded student body. Each applicant admitted to the University of Michigan fits a certain role in the college community. The university needs to admit applicants who want to run for the student body, compete on the women’s rugby team, or play cello in their orchestra. While you’re writing your response, keep in mind that your goal is to convey how you will fit into the University of Michigan’s student body. 

Start your essay with a hook to keep your reader engaged . Admissions officers read many essays every day during application season, so you must capture their attention early on. With this community essay, you don’t want to spend too much time describing the community itself as this will dilute the impact. Your reader doesn’t need to know how many times you met with your community each week or the type of food served at each meeting. Instead, focus on how your community impacted your values and perspective on life. You’ll also want to focus on the impact you had on this community. 

All your writing should be immersive. You want your reader to feel like they are a part of your story and share the same emotions you have toward your chosen community. This is the best way to get admissions officers to understand who you are.

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Our engineering programs, students, instructors and collaborations have a world-class reputation. We’re shaping the engineers who will build a future that elevates all people.

With our unparalleled resources and facilities, we offer more than just an education. No matter where you are along your career path, we can help you take the next big step. Explore your options and let us know what we can do for you .

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With 18 undergraduate majors across 14 departments , you can turn your passion into a meaningful career. Explore your specific interests through our minors and hands-on educational opportunities. Engineers are consistently paid the highest average starting salary, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). See what a U-M bachelors is worth compared to national averages.

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Fine-tune your future with an advanced degree. With specialized, integrated skills and leadership abilities, you’ll be in demand. PhD, master’s, or professional certificates — we have the engineering programs to empower your biggest ideas, no matter what your undergraduate degree is.

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A first-rate engineering education is just the beginning. Through Immersed, there are a rich variety of experiential learning opportunities to help you practice your purpose ; connect with people who share your passion and gain hands-on experience that’ll set your resumé apart from the stack. 

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Our top ranked departments and programs are home to world class facilities and instructors. Each is unique but they all intersect. Find your fit and pursue your passion.

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Baltimore Investigation Turns to Ship’s Deadly Mechanical Failure

The Dali reported a power blackout and steering problems before hitting the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore. But what went wrong so far has not been explained.

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An aerial view of a large cargo ship, with the front of the ship sitting under a collapsed bridge.

By Mike Baker and Peter Eavis

Just minutes before the cargo ship Dali was set to glide under Baltimore’s Francis Scott Key Bridge, the ship’s alarms began to blare. The lights went out. The engine halted. Even the rudder, which the crew uses to maneuver the vessel, was frozen.

As a frantic effort to restore the ship was underway, the pilot soon recognized that the aimless vessel was drifting toward disaster, and called for help.

The cascading collapse of the vessel’s most crucial operating systems left the Dali adrift until it ultimately collided with the Key bridge, knocking the span into the river and killing six people. But as crews this week were still sorting out how to disentangle the ship and recover the bodies of those who died, investigators were also turning to the most central question: What could have caused such a catastrophic failure at the worst possible moment?

Engineers, captains and shipping officials around the world are waiting for that answer in an era when the industry’s largest ships can carry four times as much cargo as those just a few decades ago, navigating through congested urban ports under bridges that may carry tens of thousands of people a day,

Already, a few key questions are emerging, according to engineers and shipping experts monitoring the investigation, and most of them point to the electrical generators that power nearly every system on the 984-foot vessel, not only the lights, navigation and steering, but the pumps that provide fuel, oil and water to the massive diesel engine.

The “ complete blackout ” reported by the pilot is hard to explain in today’s shipping world, in which large commercial vessels now operate with a range of automation, computerized monitoring, and built-in redundancies and backup systems designed to avert just such a calamity.

“In the last 30 to 40 years, the level of that redundancy has been increasing quite considerably,” said John Carlton, a professor of marine engineering at City, University of London. “The ship of today is so very different to the one of 30 years ago.”

Yet there is a wide range of possible factors contributing to the failure that investigators will have to sift through as they interview crew members, examine fuel supplies and scrutinize the ship systems that broke down that night.

If there was faulty maintenance, it could have caused a delay in starting the emergency backup generator, or an electrical fault could have prevented it from remaining engaged. Contaminated fuel or an inadvertently closed valve could have fouled or starved the main generators. Human error could have set off problems or failed to overcome them. The ship’s own automation could have led to equipment glitches. Or a fire could have broken out and damaged crucial equipment.

The answers will have implications not only for international shipping but also for who is liable for damages that S&P Global Ratings estimated at more than $2 billion.

Grace Ocean Private, the Singapore-based company that owns the Dali, said it was “fully cooperating with federal and state government agencies.” Grace Ocean’s owner is Yoshimasa Abe, a Japanese citizen who owns at least two shipping lines and more than 50 vessels, including some of the world’s biggest container ships. While the Dali was insured, Mr. Abe’s company potentially faces large claims against it, depending on the findings of the accident investigators.

Given the scope of the failure, it is possible that there were multiple problems. Timothy McCoy, a professor specializing in marine engineering at the University of Michigan, said that much like a plane crash, an extensive breakdown of a ship’s systems typically involves a sequence of events.

A close look at the potential factors would include many of the most essential elements in the operation of a modern cargo vessel — including the fuel that feeds the ship’s 55,000-horsepower diesel engine that in turn powers the ship’s propeller.

Fuel also powers the huge generators that provide electricity to container ships. And a ship like the Dali needs electrical power to run its main engine — its fuel injectors are electrically powered, for instance — and steer its rudder. Without electricity, the ship can go adrift.

An outbreak of contaminated fuel led to reported problems with 32 vessels from Texas to Singapore last August, maritime industry officials reported , with some of them reporting loss of power and propulsion at sea.

In Washington State last year, a large passenger ferry ran aground after losing power as a result of bacterial and fungal growth in the vessel’s fuel tanks that fouled the ship’s filtration systems.

At the time it was built, 2015, the Dali had four generators, according to S&P Maritime Portal, a shipping data service. Not all of them run at once, usually, but container vessels leaving port will typically have an extra generator running, to provide reserve power if needed. “At least two should be online at the same time,” said Mark Bulaclac, an academic on maritime issues who has also served as an engineer on container ships.

If all generators were running on a common source of bad fuel, that might have caused them all to fail.

Henry Lipian, a forensic crash investigator who previously worked in the Coast Guard, said the sudden loss of the ship’s generators led him to think of fuel problems as a potential culprit.

He said investigators would need to look at the fuel on board, how it was delivered, whether it had been tested beforehand and what filtration systems were on the ship. But he said that a problem with the fuel valves could be another explanation.

“I’d want to start tracing all of those fuel lines,” he said.

In Baltimore, investigators were in the process of collecting a fuel sample from the Dali in order to examine the quality, viscosity and signs of any contaminants, said Jennifer Homendy, the chair of the National Transportation Safety Board.

Yet other experts said there were also reasons to doubt the contaminated fuel scenario. New fuels typically undergo testing, and duplicate filtration systems can help clean out problematic components that were not flagged in testing. No reports have emerged of other ships having a problem from the same batch of fuel.

Maritime engineers say an electrical chain reaction could also have caused all the generators to go down. When one generator fails, it can create a situation in which there is too much demand for too little supply of electricity. Other generators are then at risk of being damaged, so the system will shut them down, too, said Richard Burke, a professor of naval architecture and marine engineering at SUNY Maritime College in New York.

“It’s as if you and I are both holding up a heavy weight and I let go,” he said, “You can’t hold it by yourself, so you drop the weight.”

A haywire generator could also zap the electrical distribution system on the ship, said Capt. Morgan McManus, an instructor at SUNY Maritime College.

When all the main generators fail, ships rely on a backup generator that is typically situated above the water line in another area of the ship, with its own fuel source.

Marine engineers say backup generators provide electricity to run some lights, the navigation system — and, crucially, the ship’s steering system. Without at least backup power, the rudder cannot be moved.

Because some lights came back on after the Dali experienced its initial blackout, it appears the backup generator did activate, but only after a roughly one-minute delay. Even then, the lights appeared to go back off, then on again, raising the possibility of a problem with the backup generator.

Ms. Homendy of the N.T.S.B. said this week that investigators had collected data “consistent with a power outage” but were still trying to determine the extent.

Clay Diamond, the head of the American Pilots’ Association, a trade group that has been in close contact with the harbor pilots in Maryland, said that steering was restored after the emergency generator came online. But even with a hard turn to the left and the dropping of an anchor, there was not enough time to turn or stop the ship.

Mr. Bulaclac, the shipping engineer, said backup generators are meant to be regularly tested by turning them on for two hours once a month. “What I would like to know is when that emergency diesel generator was last tested,” he said.

The Coast Guard inspected the Dali when it docked in the Port of New York in September but found no deficiencies on the ship. The Coast Guard did not provide details of what it inspected.

The modernization of ships may have introduced other ways vessels can fail. They have increasingly depended on computers to monitor for troubles and take action when a problem is identified. In some ways, this is a built-in layer of automatic protection: If one component gets overloaded, it can be automatically shut down to prevent further damage. But those shutdowns can cause problems on their own.

“I could not rule out that some computer failure shut all the valves off or shut off pumps that provide the fuel,” Mr. Lipian said.

Michael Forsythe and Jenny Gross contributed reporting.

Mike Baker is a national reporter for The Times, based in Seattle. More about Mike Baker

Peter Eavis reports on business, financial markets, the economy and companies across different sectors. More about Peter Eavis

This tuba player from Virginia now makes sweet STEM music with a Detroit robotics team

As a tuba player, including being a marching band section leader at the university of virginia, parker miles enjoyed being loud at times. now he enjoys taking a back seat to cheer on detroit students..

university of michigan engineering essay

As a tuba player throughout high school, college and for a year professionally with a marching band representing the pro football team in Washington, D.C., Parker Miles was accustomed to being a leader. 

But for the past two school years, Miles has settled into a supporting role within a group of mostly Detroit teenagers. And the Woodbridge, Virginia, native says he wouldn’t have it any other way. 

“I’m an extra set of hands and eyes,” says Miles, who serves as a mentor for high school students that are members of K9.0 Robotics, which is the FIRST(For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition team at the School at Marygrove in Detroit. “The kids call me ‘Coach P,’ but I’m more like a cheerleader because the kids know so much more than I do.” 

While the 34-year-old Miles may not be a robotics expert, it was his desire to “study how Black kids use, understand and imagine technology,” that led the University of Michigan Ph.D. candidate to the stately building that now serves as a high school within the Marygrove Conservancy at 8425 W. McNichols in northwest Detroit’s Fitzgerald neighborhood. 

Like the college basketball teams that have been competing in March Madness across the country, Miles says his journey with the Marygrove robotics team this month also has been magical at times. That was the case March 15-16 at the Matthaei Physical Education Center, on the campus of Wayne State University, where Marygrove was among 40 teams from across metro Detroit that competed in a FIRST In Michigan district competition. However, before the 17-student squad — known as Team 8280 in the FIRST Robotics Competition universe — experienced its shining moment, there were some daunting hurdles that needed to be cleared. 

“It was a long, hard day (March 15) of struggle and we had problems we had never seen,” Miles said about the challenges the team faced during Day 1 of the matches at Wayne State, including what Miles described in layman's terms as “one of the arms breaking off” the team’s robot and problems connected to coding that left the robot “stuck in place” for a period of time. “We had catastrophic failure after catastrophic failure, but the team was so resilient and worked through every problem. It was such a testament to their hard work and character.”

Through it all, the resilient Marygrove team qualified for the playoff portion of the competition. And after two mentally and emotionally charged days of matches, the Marygrove team settled into the Matthaei stands to cheer on the teams that finished at the very top of the final team standings. 

“It was the 30th hour of the competition; we had been there forever; and we were wearing the same clothes; but we hung out because we’re good sports,” Miles, who likened the buzz created in a gym or arena during the short matches that take place during a FIRSTRobotics competition to Olympic wrestling, said. “We were watching the teams (during the award presentations) that we wanted to be like.” 

And then, as Miles tells it, his team became the team that everyone in the Matthaei Center wanted to be like when it was announced that the team representing the School at Marygrove had been awarded the “FIRST Impact Award (formerly the Chairman’s Award), which is awarded at FIRST Robotics Competitions to “honor the team that best represents a model for other teams to emulate.” 

Miles said the honor, which FIRST defines as the “most prestigious award” the organization gives out, triggered an epic response from the Marygrove team members. And on the evening of March 25, he delighted in replaying the moment.

“They were jumping, screaming, crying and looking for people to hug,” Miles said of the response from Marygrove immediately after it was announced the team had won the Impact Award, which earned Marygrove a berth in the FIRSTIn Michigan State Championship at Saginaw State University from April 4 to April 6. “The power of their explosive energy literally knocked me out of my seat.” 

In addition, Miles shared a powerful story about how he has observed and participated in efforts where the footprint of Marygrove’s robotics team has extended beyond competitions and the students’ school grounds. 

“The kids care about each other and they care about the community,” said Miles, who also explained that community involvement is one of the major factors the judges consider when deciding which team will receive the Impact Award. “The students are excited to represent Detroit excellence at the highest level and they have shared what they have learned about STEM in their community. They have taught coding to Girl Scouts and elementary school students, not because anyone has told them to do that, but because they wanted to be there. 

“This group has done the right thing over and over and over, and they got rewarded. And it’s something that I will never forget. It took a full week to tell the story again about them (receiving the Impact Award) without crying.” 

During the evening of March 27, the subject of crying and more also was discussed by Amara Small, a senior co-captain on the Marygrove robotics team. 

“When our team heard that we won the Impact Award, there were a lot of tears from all of us; a lot of pride; and we were all hugging,” Small, who chose to attend Marygrove because of her passion for social justice and engineering, described. “And receiving the Impact Award was very personal for me because I compiled a lot of the background (essay, several summaries and videos) about our team that the judges reviewed.” 

Small later went on to speak about other topics and events that she feels strongly about, such as obtaining gender equity in STEM; a series of workshops that her team put on for local Girl Scouts, and her team’s participation in a Black Tech Saturday event at Michigan Central Station, where the team showed off the capabilities of its robot. There also was a special welcome back party during the summer of 2023 after Miles returned to Detroit after completing an internship with eBay. 

“We joked about Coach P being on a world tour because I believe he spent time in Australia,” recalled Small, who has been involved in STEM activities since the second grade and aspires to work for NASA. “We really, really missed him and it was cool to see the team come together to plan that for him. 

“And it showed that we are a family.” 

On March 25, Miles credited the team’s family spirit to lead to coach Leon Pryor Jr., of whom Miles said: “I have never seen a person more committed to the success of others.” Miles also pointed to veteran team members like junior co-captain Xavier McDonald, who joined the team as a freshman.

“I wanted to be a trailblazer,” says McDonald, who aspires to be an engineer and looks forward to compiling a portfolio highlighting his experiences to share with colleges that interest him, including the University of Michigan and Kettering University. “When we receive awards and accolades, I think it pushes us even further. They become checkpoints and then you strive to go higher and higher. And I’ve decided that I should put all of my efforts into robotics.”

Miles, no doubt, will give his very best effort on April 23 when he defends his dissertation. When sharing his findings about the Detroit youths he has been in a community with on the Marygrove robotics team, Miles will have several robotics competition experiences to call upon, including a FIRST In Michigan district competition at Renaissance High School that will conclude on March 30 and the state championship competition in April, which also will play a major role in determining the Michigan teams that will qualify for the 2024 FIRST Championship — a world championship event scheduled for April 17-20 in Houston. But regardless of how well the Marygrove team fares in upcoming tournaments, Miles, who is seeking a doctorate in education and digital studies, has hinted that competition standings will not be the first thing on his mind when he shares what he has learned from young people on the Marygrove robotics team.

“The joy is fundamental,” declared Miles, who now proudly lives in Detroit on the city’s North End. “The coolest thing is to see the kids so fully being themselves. And this group is committed to being joyful and committed to learning and growing.” 

Scott Talley is a native Detroiter, a proud product of Detroit Public Schools and a lifelong lover of Detroit culture in its diverse forms. In his second tour with the Free Press, which he grew up reading as a child, he is excited and humbled to cover the city’s neighborhoods and the many interesting people who define its various communities. Contact him at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter @STalleyfreep. Read more of Scott's stories at  www.freep.com/mosaic/detroit-is/ . Please help us grow great community-focused journalism by  becoming a subscriber . 

‘Excited to represent Detroit excellence at the highest level’ 

What:  K9.0 Robotics, the FIRST(For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition team at the School at Marygrove in Detroit

Angelo Barton  - Software

Tahara Drew  - Team Lead Electrical  – Drive Team

Aslan Fleming – Mechanical

Olivia Flood – Team Lead Electrical

Joshua Gassaway - Software

Karion Gooden - Mechanical

Xavier McDonald – Captain and Team Lead Mechanical – Drive Team

Corey McKenzie - Business

Shyann Miller - Scouting

Staja' Miller – Team Lead Computer Aided Design – Drive Team

Emily Nahabedian - Electrical

Leon Pryor III – Team Lead Software – Drive Team

Ryen Ray - Mechanical

Amara Small – Captain and Team Lead Business

Bryson Taylor - Mechanical

Frank Washington – Mechanical  

Marshawn Wilson Grissett – Mechanical – Drive Team

2024 Robot Name:  Anubis

Lead Coach:  Leon Pryor Jr.

Team Mentor:  Parker Miles (“Coach P”) 

Upcoming Event:  FIRSTIn Michigan State Championship at Saginaw State University; April 4-6.

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